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Thread: Edge Joint after Ripping

  1. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by Andy D Jones View Post
    Glue line rip blades usually have "TCG" (triple chip grind) teeth to provide a smoother ripped edge.

    Ensure that the saw blade is parallel to the rip fence. Some prefer to have it toed out a thousandth or two.

    Use a feather-board when ripping, to consistently hold the wood up against the rip fence.

    Sending them through the planer on edge, ganged together, also ensures final widths are uniform for all such pieces.

    Sanding the edges while ganged and clamped together will also help steady the sander for better, more uniform results. Gang and clamp them together on a known flat surface.

    -- Andy - Arlington TX
    This ^^

    A sanding disc on the table saw also works well.
    Last edited by Robert Engel; 04-16-2020 at 10:22 AM.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Lebanon, TN
    Posts
    836
    That's cool, the machine plays smoothing music you can hear...

    There's almost something therapeutic about watching the shavings peel off.

  3. #33
    I have a Shelix head on my PM planer which cuts through the wood at an angle. This produces a smoother cut, but also can have a tendency to tip the wood part when running it on edge. This results in a cut that is square at the leading edge, and tipped considerably at the trailing edge, ruining the work piece. I find that in my case, 3/4" is not thick enough to resist this tipping effect, although thicker parts can be made to work. I have to rely on my jointer to remove saw marks, then an edge sander to produce a finished edge.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Austin Texas
    Posts
    1,856
    Another factor in achieving a glue-capable run through a machine is to maintain a steady speed when pushing the material through the blade. Variations in the speed result in ridges in the surface and is one of the reasons that commercial outfits use powered feeders to push material through a machine. I can tell when I didn't plan my hand-position changes when ripping with either my TS or BS. On my TS, I use an older, full kerfed Freud 20t rip blade that typically leaves a glue ready surface if I maintain a fairly constant speed through the blade.
    David

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Collegeville PA (30 min west of Philly)
    Posts
    695
    Perhaps I'm not being fussy enough, but I just went out to the shop to look at a large pile of boards that I ripped recently to check myself... I cannot see saw marks on any of the boards, nor have I ever noticed such a thing. I always use the table saw to rip to final width, and the edge obtained there is as nice as a jointed edge. I'm not claiming superior knowledge, this is how I was taught by a professional woodworker to do it.

    (Note: and this is with a run of the mill saw blade, not some specialty blade)

    Admittedly, I've only worked with maple, oak, pine, black walnut, ash, hemlock, black locust, and a mystery wood or two... so perhaps I'm just getting lucky?
    - Bob R.
    Collegeville PA (30 minutes west of Philly)

  6. #36
    Are these cuts for face frames or what use? On pieces that are not to be glued, I use my edge sander to clean up edges of boards. For glue-ups, I use my jointer.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    553
    Not trying to offend anyone here, but I've always felt that a glue line should be as invisible as possible. I align glued boards carefully to hide the different grain patterns and I make sure my edges are as square, smooth, and straight as possible. If edge gluing any boards into a panel, I always joint opposite sides in opposite orientations to eliminate any deviation from 90 degrees. If I hit it with a plane afterwards, it is set to only remove the ridges left by imperfections in the jointer knives and the scallops. Most times, I just drag a sharp scraper along the edge to accomplish this as I tend to screw it up more with a plane.

    If I am dressing stiles or rails, or need to clean up aprons, etc, I rip to parallel on the table saw and joint one edge for square. I then plane the opposite side for square and parallel. I use the slow speed on my finishing planer and rarely have an issue with snipe due to the stiffness of the board on edge. Anything that needs to be the same width goes through the planer on edge (up to about 3" max). I do use straight knives.

    I have several quality saw blades including a Freud Glue Line Rip. Even when new, the slightest adjustment of pressure on the board while ripping will result in saw blade marks. Just because you can't see them doesn't mean they are not there. You can make a very nice glue joint with a glue line rip blade, but you can make it even less visible with a dressed edge. Use some stiff chalk to rub down your cut edge and highlight the blade marks... you might be surprised.

    Now, you don't have to be as picky as I am.... a saw cut glue line is usually plenty strong enough.

    Dan

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Inkerman, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    673
    Joint, rip oversize, joint, thickness plane, finish with fine set handplane or supersurfacer.
    Glue- up panels, always fitted with fine tuned hand-planed finish.

  9. #39
    Joint,

    636ABC8B-C600-454D-AFB0-5A307C21E8EE.jpg

    Rip,

    374BC4C6-0DF0-4264-AD22-5E5B179B9E62.jpg

    Plane,

    C80F4B17-37BE-41C3-B8A6-A3792384EAD6.jpg

    I do all that oversized then repeat the whole thing after it sits overnight say 1/4 at time till I get to within 1/8 of where I want to finish. I then joint, rip, plane, joint rip plane one more time or two more times however you wanna slice it.

    Did this today, well over a few days as it was 6/4 material.

    Im wicked picky and I just run the boards on edge through the planer on both edges for my last passes and my glue joints are prefect everytime. I do have a insert cutterhead so that helps. Never seen the scallops be a problem regarding my edge joints.

    C90874E0-486A-4C1C-94C2-729CEC4A5828.jpg

    AEB7A490-FBF9-4F4A-A382-103985F1A47A.jpg

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Arlington, TX
    Posts
    198
    re: Supersufacer; Does Marunaka offer an optional accessory to roll those shavings onto cardboard tubes?...

    Could make a lot of money these days with that...

    -- Andy - Arlington TX

  11. #41
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Oskaloosa Iowa
    Posts
    96
    I would like to thank all that have contributed to this thread. Several of you have taken the time to share your techniques and shared your photos...Thanks for taking the time. It has been a eye opener for me in my pursuit for becoming a better wood working craftsman.


    I have had some of my thoughts confirmed about getting a thickness planer in the future.


    I have had my eyes opened to some hand tools that I have never pursued. A couple months ago I dug out some Old hand planes that have been around my work place for yrs. I posted on the Neanderthal Forum about them. Well yesterday I took one apart and did a quick restore. Knocked the rust off and did a crude sharpening of the knife. Its not perfect but it has sparked a interest for going with Hand Planes. I found two planes and in the photo is a no. 4 that I plan on using. I might need to get some new knifes.



    The results were way better in one way than my jointer with no scalloping from the jonter knifes and a nicer finished edge. It will be a learned talent to keep the edge square.



    I could go on but I will cut it short. This has been one of the most educational threads for me and has steered me to learn something new in my wood working.


    Thankspalne - Copy 1.jpg
    Last edited by Mike Burke; 04-17-2020 at 11:22 AM.

  12. #42
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    NE Connecticut
    Posts
    599
    Jeez, Patrick, you need to get some better tools and a real workbench!

    Seriously, VERY nice shop and some gorgeous lumber.


  13. #43
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    New Brunswick, Canada
    Posts
    303
    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Walsh View Post
    Joint,

    636ABC8B-C600-454D-AFB0-5A307C21E8EE.jpg

    Rip,

    374BC4C6-0DF0-4264-AD22-5E5B179B9E62.jpg

    Plane,

    C80F4B17-37BE-41C3-B8A6-A3792384EAD6.jpg

    I do all that oversized then repeat the whole thing after it sits overnight say 1/4 at time till I get to within 1/8 of where I want to finish. I then joint, rip, plane, joint rip plane one more time or two more times however you wanna slice it.

    Did this today, well over a few days as it was 6/4 material.

    Im wicked picky and I just run the boards on edge through the planer on both edges for my last passes and my glue joints are prefect everytime. I do have a insert cutterhead so that helps. Never seen the scallops be a problem regarding my edge joints.

    C90874E0-486A-4C1C-94C2-729CEC4A5828.jpg

    AEB7A490-FBF9-4F4A-A382-103985F1A47A.jpg
    Patrick, I was admiring your jointer table extension in the first picture. I definitely need one for my 8" Poitras. Was attempting to edge joint some 12' ash alone in the shop. Obviously the first 4 feet was a real struggle alone. How is your leg adjustable on that? Thanks. Greg

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