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Thread: Load Center for "new" shop

  1. #46
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    SE MI
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Pratt View Post
    Nice job bending that 1.5" conduit. It can be a handful without forms or springs.
    Thanks! I took it slow with a heat gun, used some 2x3's screwed down to a piece of plywood to get the offset right. There's just one small bit of unevenness, but it isn't that obvious.

  2. #47
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Okotoks AB
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    2,148
    In a pinch, I've used the truck exhaust to bend PVC. Just stick it on the end of the exhaust pipe & put the engine on high idle for a few minutes. Way better than trying to use a torch.

  3. #48
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    SE MI
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    Tiny update, my emt is run. I'm only putting in the bare minimum - my general plan is to use two 20A outlets in the rear - one for lighting, the other for "tool of the moment". As I clean up and get my shop in order I'll use that time to decide on where to put outlets and how best to run them.

    Wired load center, with outlet box below. I have to shorten the fiber optic conduit a bit.



    First-ever EMT bend. Screwed up one stick of EMT to get this right.



    This conduit leads to the exterior lighting - in code there appears to be some requirement for exterior lighting outside the detached structure's entrance. I hope I read that right, as this was a lot of work.



    Though a bit overkill, this box contains two things - a Wifi switch and an exterior LED light power source. The LED lights themselves are low power and I ran the cable through a PVC conduit prior to installing the cabinet. Though this metal box may act as a faraday cage, in testing wifi was able to reach the switch.


  4. #49
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    Apr 2013
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    Okotoks AB
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    It looks like the green bonding screw is still in place, which connects the neutral to ground. Unless this is a main service entrance from the utility, that screw needs to come out. Be sure to confirm this with your local AHJ.

    Nice job on the EMT bending.

  5. #50
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    SE MI
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Pratt View Post
    It looks like the green bonding screw is still in place, which connects the neutral to ground. Unless this is a main service entrance from the utility, that screw needs to come out. Be sure to confirm this with your local AHJ.

    Nice job on the EMT bending.
    Thanks!

    This load center came with a bonding jumper. The bonding jumper is off - you can see an empty screw hole to the left of the green screw. To install the bonding jumper, I would remove that green screw, and screw down an L-shaped piece of metal using that screw and a supplied screw. Not sure I should remove the existing screw? The instructions don't say to remove it, and there's no continuity between ground/neutral.

  6. #51
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    Apr 2013
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    Okotoks AB
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    That's good. Sometimes it's a screw, sometimes a strap. As long as ground and neutral are isolated.

  7. #52
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    SE MI
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    Final inspection on Monday!

  8. #53
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    SoCal
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    20,599
    Best of luck!
    "The Danish government believes that if we train 5,000 designers, and produce
    one Hans Wegner, the money is very well spent." - Ole Gjerlov-Knudsen

  9. #54
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    SE MI
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    Approved! I have a total of two 20A outlets at the moment, and an exterior lighting circuit. In the short term I need to now finish my gas line, get that approved, and then hook up the water line somehow (yeah, I ran a water line earlier this summer too), dig out the floor drain (to extend the pipe to daylight), and do some grading. And get the exterior foam covered one way or another.

  10. #55
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    53,857
    I'll suggest that if you do not have really good gas line experience, consider having that done by a licensed contractor...it's one of those things that you absolutely don't want to have a problem with for obvious reasons.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  11. #56
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    Jan 2009
    Location
    SE MI
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    I'll suggest that if you do not have really good gas line experience, consider having that done by a licensed contractor...it's one of those things that you absolutely don't want to have a problem with for obvious reasons.
    I don't, and am having certain parts done by a plumber, but I ran the gas poly line already (proper depth, tracer wire, bonded to ground, etc...). It's being inspected, though based on my electrical experience just now I'm a little concerned about the thoroughness of the inspection.

  12. #57
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    Placing the line is pretty basic. It's all the inside work that you have to be really careful with around gas service...from where you transition from the buried line to all the work beyond that. Maybe do the work but get it checked by a licensed plumber before inspection. And yea, inspections are not necessarily "thorough" in some cases. Since gas can go "boom" big-time, well...
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

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