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Thread: Started On New Kitchen Table

  1. #46
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    Mar 2015
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    Hold on. Nothing wrong with a strategic hump sloping down to where you normally sit. Helps limes, salt shakers, bottles and cans and the occasional Tamale to roll your way. No one will know.

  2. #47
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    Nov 2014
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    Baton Rouge, LA
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    When we moved into our house we put the table into a closed in back porch with a sloped floor. I loved it because I could orient my plate to keep juices from flowing into other foods. I think all tables should slope towards the eater a little bit, so plane the top with a slight hump also.

    Iíll bet my wife wonít let me do that if I ever build a table.

  3. #48
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    Feb 2012
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    Tucson, AZ
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Mueller View Post
    Hold on. Nothing wrong with a strategic hump sloping down to where you normally sit. Helps limes, salt shakers, bottles and cans and the occasional Tamale to roll your way. No one will know.
    Phil,

    Thanks for a good laugh. The good news it isn't much of a hump and everything else is straight. I just glad there is no wind.

    ken

  4. #49
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    Feb 2012
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    Tucson, AZ
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Focht View Post
    When we moved into our house we put the table into a closed in back porch with a sloped floor. I loved it because I could orient my plate to keep juices from flowing into other foods. I think all tables should slope towards the eater a little bit, so plane the top with a slight hump also.

    I’ll bet my wife won’t let me do that if I ever build a table.

    Gary,

    Your wife and mine must be sisters . The first thing MsBubba will do when I set the table up in the kitchen is to run her hand over the top and mention she can feel the plane tracks while giving me the "look".

    ken

  5. #50
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
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    Tucson, AZ
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    I'm beavering away on the slab. With MsBubba's help we brought base and slab to the breakfast nook to judge how short to make it. A little over 100mm came off each end and 25mm off one side. It sure looks smaller and is easier to move around. Right now I'm using one of the #8's because it is easy to pull on the off side but may switch to one of the wood stock jointers soon.

    Here it is in the breakfast nook:

    tableTopOnBase.jpg

    It is slow going both because the #8 is a beast and summer is here in the desert. That's the bad news, the good is I've retired so there is plenty of time to work early mornings.

    ken

  6. #51
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Carlsbad, CA
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    1,674
    Looking great Ken - I love the look of trestle tables.

    Any thought to contrasting wood for wedges? Maybe something dark?

  7. #52
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    N. Idaho
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    1,027
    Hi Ken,

    Congratulations on the retirement-long time coming.

    Table looks good too!
    "You can observe a lot just by watching."
    --Yogi Berra

  8. #53
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    Aug 2012
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    Missouri
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    What happened? The legs are straight up and down. Looking good.

  9. #54
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    Feb 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Allen1010 View Post
    Looking great Ken - I love the look of trestle tables.

    Any thought to contrasting wood for wedges? Maybe something dark?
    Mike,

    Thanks, This will be our first. I hope it is as functional as I expect.

    Good thought, the wedges that are in there came from the scrap pile and were the first hunk of wood I saw that was big enough. If I wanted to go all the way there is some Ebony (if I can find it) somewhere in the wood pile or I've nice 4/4 piece of dark Walnut that might look good. The base units still need to be cleaned up as well as finishing the slab, lots of scut work to go, but the fat lady is in the building.

    ken

  10. #55
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    Feb 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christopher Charles View Post
    Hi Ken,

    Congratulations on the retirement-long time coming.

    Table looks good too!
    Thanks Chris,

    That is what MsBubba says also. Someday I may learn to listen to her.

    ken

  11. #56
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    Feb 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by James Pallas View Post
    What happened? The legs are straight up and down. Looking good.
    James,

    LOL, I thought about it for a couple of seconds.

    ken

  12. #57
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    Mar 2015
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    SE Michigan
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    Looks great, Ken. Just out of curiosity, because Iím not that familiar with wedged tenon joinery, does the circled spot get a wedge as well?

    2099EB7C-A995-4582-80A9-0AEFC69D9B50.jpeg

  13. #58
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    Feb 2012
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    Tucson, AZ
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Mueller View Post
    Looks great, Ken. Just out of curiosity, because I’m not that familiar with wedged tenon joinery, does the circled spot get a wedge as well?

    2099EB7C-A995-4582-80A9-0AEFC69D9B50.jpeg

    Phil,

    No, I like to make the stretcher mortise loose, could be from making benches but with it loose it is much easier to fit and take apart. I can see where some might find it offensive but I do not. Once the wedges are driven home that sucker ain't moving. BTW, when finished I will likely takes Mike's advise and replace those wedges with darker and shorter ones.

    ken

  14. #59
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
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    After the last post I was close to finishing the slab and cut it to final length. Wrong move shaving breath. It did some stupid wood tricks and turned into a "U". Bottom line I cut the slab into three pieces, re-jointed and re-glued the slab and now I'm in the process of fitting slab to base.

    For the fitting I've moved to the back garden. Mostly because I need the room to work. It is not as convenient as working in the shop but having room to move things as needed makes up for the need to find and move tools. Now it is time for the required praise of the portable Moravian bench, you have heard it before, bottom line it makes it possible.

    Working on the base:

    tableFittingSlabA.jpg


    From the other side showing the portable bench:

    tableFittingSlabB.jpg


    This part isn't difficult, just fiddly with doing a little, checking work, doing a little more, once close, moving the slab back and forth until the sucker is nailed.

    One hold up is it is only 0800 and I'm already sweating like a pig and needing breaks often. We had another Monsoon type storm last night with rain and very strong gusting winds. I expect the RH is high because my sweat is not drying quickly, instead it is getting on my glasses and in my eyes, Now that I'm retired it is no big deal, take breaks and stop when the sweat is really flowing. It will be there tomorrow.

    ken

  15. #60
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
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    This time the fat lady is truly in the building. What is left is blind pegging the slab to the base, putting a small chamfer on the lower surface and breaking the edges. Tung oil on the base and maybe a Waterlux finish on the slab.


    Side view:

    tableSlabAndBaseA.jpg




    From the end:

    tableSlabAndBaseC.jpg




    I expect by the weekend this sucker will be in the kitchen and in use.

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