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Thread: Repair or replace door?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
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    Repair or replace door?

    Sorry, this is not a real woodworking question but not really too much off topic. This is an exterior fiberglass patio door that the bottom 6" has decayed. The door is still in nice condition other than this decayed area. I'm trying to figure out if I should repair this or just replace it. To repair I thought about machining a piece of pressure treated pine to fill in the rotted out cavity. I think there are some exterior wood fillers on the market that are used in porch repairs on columns and rails. How would you repair this? Sorry for photo being sideways.
    door repair 1.jpg

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    This isn't my area of expertise but that doesn't look like fiberglass to me. It looks like an ordinary wood door to me. Fiberglass wouldn't rot. It supposed to be very durable which is one of it's benefits.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
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    So Cal
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    I would make a new door if I thought I could make a better one.
    If I didnít or didnít have the time repair for sure.
    If you make a new maybe you could use the glass and hinges knobs ?

    Good Luck
    Aj

  4. #4
    Yes, I would NOT buy another door. I would dry it our with a hair dryer. Chisel down to undamaged wood. Use hair dryer
    again. Make a loose fitting block of wood to fit. Epoxy inthe new block. If you have some copper naphthanate,paint in on
    the final wood surface. Let it dry couple days. Prime and paint.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Mel Fulks View Post
    Yes, I would NOT buy another door. I would dry it our with a hair dryer. Chisel down to undamaged wood. Use hair dryer
    again. Make a loose fitting block of wood to fit. Epoxy inthe new block. If you have some copper naphthanate,paint in on
    the final wood surface. Let it dry couple days. Prime and paint.
    +1. .......
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."
    - Sir Edmund Burke

  6. #6
    What is that going on with the door's skin? If that damage extends beyond that corner, I wouldn't bother with a repair.

  7. #7
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    Between No Where & No Place ,WA
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    Believe that Mel Fulks is on to it!

  8. #8
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    fayetteville Arkansas
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ronald Blue View Post
    This isn't my area of expertise but that doesn't look like fiberglass to me. It looks like an ordinary wood door to me. Fiberglass wouldn't rot. It supposed to be very durable which is one of it's benefits.
    I didn't explain the construction of this door very well on the opening post. In Lowe's or Home Depot you will see a hundred of these type exterior doors with either steel or fiberglass skins. This one is fiberglass skin with a Styrofoam core, and about 2" soft wood frame around the outside. I dug the rotten wood all the way down to the foam core.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnny means View Post
    What is that going on with the door's skin? If that damage extends beyond that corner, I wouldn't bother with a repair.
    The skin is fine, just dirty.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Michigan
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    1,236
    Last summer I took my exterior doors to the shop one at a time and repaired as needed and repainted. Good to go for many years more. Would not have been very successful fixing in place.

  11. #11
    As a contractor, Iíd replace it.

    Fixing is is an option but not practical from a time/cost perspective if you value your time.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
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    Elizabethtown, PA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neil Gaskin View Post
    As a contractor, Iíd replace it.

    Fixing is an option but not practical from a time/cost perspective if you value your time.
    As a contractor two things: your getting paid, your labor is cheaper to just replace the door. As a homeowner, maybe the OP has a spare few hours or now with the Covid19 crap is laid off and trying to save some $$$. Either way a repair isn't all that difficult if the rot is contained in a few inches. Use polyurethane glue and an epoxy sealer over the repair and you'll be in good shape.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Atlanta
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    As long as the wood behind the hing is solid , you can fill in the shredded part. Either with a wooden plug , or with epoxy filler or bondo.

    If the hinge wood is soft - NEW DOOR - end of story.

    But................................before doing any work you should determine where the water that rotted that section is coming from. Then you need to rectify that; or any repair you make is no more than a band-aid.

  14. #14
    2nd on the bondo. I find that bondo is a great wood filler, sticks to the wood, will not fall out, does not rot. If you can just remove all rotted wood, fill it with bondo, let it dry, sand and paint it. Done.

  15. #15
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    Yep, decided to go the repair route, got more time than money. Took the door down today and moved into the shop. Will do some kind of plug and fill method after I get all the rot out. Good info, thanks for sharing.

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