Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 31

Thread: Total newby help with table saw Please!

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Reno, NV
    Posts
    248

  2. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Walsh View Post
    Wow that was quick!

    Just start using it. It will tell you whatís wrong. Then you get to figure out why and what to do about it. Thatís half the joy of this whole thing.

    But if you need help just PM me and Iíll do what I can. I have become pretty darn good at calibrating sliders.

    Donít get these just yet as you might no need them. Just make some test cuts and measure.

    But a couple dial indicators and mag bases a straight edge and a very accurate high quality square will soon become your friends if you donít already have them.

    You could get lucky and need nothing?

    You can also get by with a tape measure a set of feeler gauges and level and get close enough for most.
    Thanks for the offer. What is a mag base? By calibrating sliders, you mean calipers?

  3. #18
    https://www.mscdirect.com/browse/tnp...caAjD7EALw_wcB

    But again hold off till you find you need it.

    I find in Woodworking it’s best to start ground up. You get a much better understanding working ground up vrs starting at the top.

    Kinda like learn to cut a M&T with hand tools before you convince yourself you need the shop full of tools I have. Dint get me wrong machines and tools are the only practice efficient way to make anything in a profitable manner. But if it’s not about profit taking the time start at the bottom and work up is worthwhile.

    Not like don’t buy the slider but make some cuts and measure on the diagonal. But a good square to the face and edges. Learn the 345 rule and use it. Then when you get sick of banging your head off the wall buy the expensive straight edge gauges so forth and so on..


    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Hardin View Post
    Thanks for the offer. What is a mag base? By calibrating sliders, you mean calipers?

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Reno, NV
    Posts
    248
    A very quick decision.

    A primer on sliding table calibration. Link. When I received my K3, it was reasonably calibrated. If you want tighter tolerances, then you will need some basic precision tools. Minimally, a precision straight edge, feeler gauges, a dial indicator with a magnetic base, and a precision square (larger is better). The first time you calibrate the saw, plan for a few hours. It gets faster afterward on subsequent attempts.

    If you haven't already, watch Felder videos on the big sliding table saw. It shows how a the machine is used. On YouTube, Sam Blasco and Extreme Woodworker have good videos for machine usages.

    Subscribe to the Felder Owner Group (FOG) forum above.

    Agree with Patrick, use it when it arrives. It will tell you what needs calibration.

    I move the machine with a narrow fork pallet jack.

    Plan on building a Fritz & Franz jig. Should look into getting some clamps for securing stock to the table; DIY manual or custom-made pneumatic clamps.

    Again, subscribe to FOG.

  5. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Wakahisa Shinta View Post
    A very quick decision.

    A primer on sliding table calibration. Link. When I received my K3, it was reasonably calibrated. If you want tighter tolerances, then you will need some basic precision tools. Minimally, a precision straight edge, feeler gauges, a dial indicator with a magnetic base, and a precision square (larger is better). The first time you calibrate the saw, plan for a few hours. It gets faster afterward on subsequent attempts.

    If you haven't already, watch Felder videos on the big sliding table saw. It shows how a the machine is used. On YouTube, Sam Blasco and Extreme Woodworker have good videos for machine usages.

    Subscribe to the Felder Owner Group (FOG) forum above.

    Agree with Patrick, use it when it arrives. It will tell you what needs calibration.

    I move the machine with a narrow fork pallet jack.

    Plan on building a Fritz & Franz jig. Should look into getting some clamps for securing stock to the table; DIY manual or custom-made pneumatic clamps.

    Again, subscribe to FOG.
    i will get started on all of these immediately. Thx.

  6. #21
    Clams are great. I have bitched at every employer I have had for not having them for the sliding saw. But strong he’s also work. Even for small pieces but that kinda thing comes in time after many hours behind a slider. Some may never feel it prudent to make small cuts without cuts. As the result of lack of choice and a commitment to high quality work I git used to making risky cuts in what has become a fairly safe manner without any clamps.

    But if you have the money just buy Macs clamps.

    I made some very nice ones but it cost me nearly as much as buying Macs. I think like $1800 as a machinist had to thread the rod and make the vases for me.

    Best pic I had of clamps without digging to deep.

    348FD774-B3D3-4F1C-BC4D-833991A46210.jpg


    Quote Originally Posted by Wakahisa Shinta View Post
    A very quick decision.

    A primer on sliding table calibration. Link. When I received my K3, it was reasonably calibrated. If you want tighter tolerances, then you will need some basic precision tools. Minimally, a precision straight edge, feeler gauges, a dial indicator with a magnetic base, and a precision square (larger is better). The first time you calibrate the saw, plan for a few hours. It gets faster afterward on subsequent attempts.

    If you haven't already, watch Felder videos on the big sliding table saw. It shows how a the machine is used. On YouTube, Sam Blasco and Extreme Woodworker have good videos for machine usages.

    Subscribe to the Felder Owner Group (FOG) forum above.

    Agree with Patrick, use it when it arrives. It will tell you what needs calibration.

    I move the machine with a narrow fork pallet jack.

    Plan on building a Fritz & Franz jig. Should look into getting some clamps for securing stock to the table; DIY manual or custom-made pneumatic clamps.

    Again, subscribe to FOG.

  7. #22
    Here's my take. If you're new to WW and WW machinery, I'd keep it simple if I were you. There's a lot going on with every machine you get, with adjustments and maintenance galore. Start with the best basics you can afford and starting with a 3hp Saw Stop will be a dream starting point. As you develop experience, technique and your own work flow, you may or may not want to move up to a slider. With a Saw Stop, a nice Jointer/Planer, Dust Collector, Bandsaw, Compressor, Router Table and a Track Saw System, like Festool, you'll have everything you need in your garage shop. I'm sure I'm leaving something out, but you get the idea.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
    Location
    New Brunswick, Canada
    Posts
    30
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Hardin View Post
    i will get started on all of these immediately. Thx.
    Congratulations on retirement and the new saw. All those that were surprised at your quick decision must have missed the ATC bit lol! As a retired Controller myself, I get it. I went through a similar process this fall and went with a Sawstop but I have only half your space and rarely work with sheet goods. Best of luck setting up your new workshop!

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Reno, NV
    Posts
    248
    The peripherals for the K3 do not have to be expensive. I modified this clamp to work with the K3. I have two, front and back. I also use these clamps with a wooden T-nut in the slider table's channel. Mine happens to be the Festool variety, but any other brand will work. Mac Campshure's clamps are nice, but they will costs you.

    A Veritas aluminum straight edge works well. I have the 50-inch length version. A Stabila level also works because it has a milled reference surface. An inexpensive dial indicator and magnetic base at HF is more than adequate for the calibrating task. A large machinist square is not too expensive if you are not buying Starrett or equivalent.

    Extension table for the sliding table can be constructed yourself from scrap plywood. T nut can be milled from hardwood. I made enough T nut stock to last decades. All from scrap hardwood.

    My first Fritz and Franz jig was just two block of scrap poplar with a hardwood bar at the bottom to fit the T track in the slider. The jig is a safety must for cutting small stock using the sliding table.

  10. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by David Publicover View Post
    Congratulations on retirement and the new saw. All those that were surprised at your quick decision must have missed the ATC bit lol! As a retired Controller myself, I get it. I went through a similar process this fall and went with a Sawstop but I have only half your space and rarely work with sheet goods. Best of luck setting up your new workshop!
    Finally, someone gets me, lol!! Iím used to making decisions in seconds. No one ever called me a procrastinator.

    whereíd ya work? Center or tower?

  11. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by Wakahisa Shinta View Post
    The peripherals for the K3 do not have to be expensive. I modified this clamp to work with the K3. I have two, front and back. I also use these clamps with a wooden T-nut in the slider table's channel. Mine happens to be the Festool variety, but any other brand will work. Mac Campshure's clamps are nice, but they will costs you.

    A Veritas aluminum straight edge works well. I have the 50-inch length version. A Stabila level also works because it has a milled reference surface. An inexpensive dial indicator and magnetic base at HF is more than adequate for the calibrating task. A large machinist square is not too expensive if you are not buying Starrett or equivalent.

    Extension table for the sliding table can be constructed yourself from scrap plywood. T nut can be milled from hardwood. I made enough T nut stock to last decades. All from scrap hardwood.

    My first Fritz and Franz jig was just two block of scrap poplar with a hardwood bar at the bottom to fit the T track in the slider. The jig is a safety must for cutting small stock using the sliding table.
    i have several one piece squares from over the years. Are they normally accurate. Didnít cost much and probably purchased at lowes or HD

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
    Location
    New Brunswick, Canada
    Posts
    30
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Hardin View Post
    Finally, someone gets me, lol!! I’m used to making decisions in seconds. No one ever called me a procrastinator.

    where’d ya work? Center or tower?
    Started in a couple smaller towers. Spent most of my career in a Centre dealing with transoceanic. You?
    I've been messing around with woodworking for years but mostly as a means to an end. I got more serious about learning to do better work a couple years ago but have a long way to go.
    Your new saw looks great. With the social distancing situation we are now in, you’ll have lots of time to set it up and dial it in.

  13. #28
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Highland MI
    Posts
    3,916
    Blog Entries
    11
    I would go with the 3 hp Sawstop cabinet saw with long rails. And a cheap tracksaw to break down sheet goods so you can easily final cut on the Sawstop. First project before you start building cabinet boxes should be a crosscut sled big enough to make the top and bottom cuts on the boxes. Perfectly perpendicular to the sides.
    NOW you tell me...

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Location
    Denver
    Posts
    144
    Bob

    Congrats on the new saw - You'll love it.

    I wish I had jumped in earlier - My advise would have been, "November Bravo Oscar Bravo, you're cleared to Kilo3 via radar vectors Hammer, then as filed. Climb maintain $5,000, expect further immediately after departure. Departure frequency 12$.$. Squawk 9999."

    Cheers,
    Mark

  15. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Hockenberg View Post
    Bob

    Congrats on the new saw - You'll love it.

    I wish I had jumped in earlier - My advise would have been, "November Bravo Oscar Bravo, you're cleared to Kilo3 via radar vectors Hammer, then as filed. Climb maintain $5,000, expect further immediately after departure. Departure frequency 12$.$. Squawk 9999."

    Cheers,
    Mark
    So long as weíre not squawking 7500. Lol.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •