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Thread: Rabbet joint to put glass

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
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    Rabbet joint to put glass

    Hi all,

    I am still semi new to woodworking and going to be working on making a table similar to the attached for a buddy.
    I have a Bosch plunge router with the below edge guide i just bought.

    My question/advice needed how to make the rabbet joint to where the glass sets in with this router set up? And what kind of bit I would need?

    https://www.amazon.com/Bosch-Deluxe-...s%2C177&sr=8-1
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    Make a square-edged frame, then use a rabbeting bit like this https://www.toolstoday.com/v-10655-210-12.html and square up the corners with a chisel. Alternately, make the frame with a half-lap joint that forms the rabbet.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    Oskaloosa Iowa
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    make sure you rout the rabbet 1/4" deep for 1/4" glass. So that its flush with the top of the table.
    Wouldn't just a rabbeting router bit like Kevin's link work if the bearing was the right size ? Say 3/8 wide x 1/4" deep

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
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    Columbus, Ohio, USA
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    I have that attachment for the router and I have never used it. If you use a bit with the bearing similar to what was recommended by Kevin, you do not need the attachment because the bearing sets your depth.

    Step 1: Figure out how far in your want to route. So how big will your ledge be. This will tell you the width of the cutter. I purchased a bunch of cutters of many widths, and almost all of them are sitting unused. I should have just bought what I needed.

    Step 2: How deep will you cut (depth from the top of the table to where the glass will sit. Make sure your cutter can cut that depth.

    Those are probably your primary concerns.

    Do remember that your router has a preferred cutting direction to control the cut. I do not remember off hand, which direction that is, but, based on the direction that the blade is spinning, it will want to pull the router in a particular direction. You want to cut in the opposite direction so that you have better control of the cut. That may change based on other criteria such as wood grain direction and similar, but, if you are not aware of any of this, ask about it before you do your cut.

    Finally, I am curious how you secure the glass in place. I suppose that gravity holds it in place.

  5. #5
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    While this is not about the bit (and this is new to you) it will help you set the depth. I would go to a glass shop and see what options you might like before making the rabbet. Most likely 1/4" thick glass is what you will want but not with unfinished edges. There's several options from having them simply take a belt sander to the glass to knock off the sharp edge (not really all that pretty) all the way up to paying extra to have a nice beveled edge. You'll just need the approx size of the glass to get an idea of the cost. Some glass companies can do it in house while others just order it from their suppliers (usually less than a week to get delivery). Also you may opt to go with colored glass. Bronze and grey are two choices that might work well with your choice of wood. However you may find something bold like red works for your buddy.

    Since the outside edge on a beveled piece of glass is thinner you will not want the rabbet as deep which is why making the choice on glass before making the rabbet is important. Kevin said you can use a chisel to square up the corners but you can have the glass shop put rounded corners on the top. One final thing is that some shops might recommend putting a clear shim under the glass in case the wood moves slightly so it will not rattle. This shouldn't raise the glass up too much but you might want to account for it. I would wait until it's made and then have the glass shop measure it (so they are on the hook in case it doesn't fit) before ordering it though. Plus it means the glass is not sitting in your shop waiting for the table to be finished begging to get broken.

  6. #6
    Check out the following Youtube video, it explains the issue on cutting direction Andrew was describing among other things. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2YaHMNeZrDc

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    Leesville, SC
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    2,275
    I made two display tables for my children where I cut the 1/4" deep rabbet on the table saw and then mitered the corners before assembly.

    Table 2 (2).JPG
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  8. #8
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    Jan 2018
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    Cleveland, Ohio
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    Thanks everyone! These are very helpful. I was going to use the table saw, but I dont have a dado blade or dado insert yet. So I will give it a try with the router.

    Thanks again!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Mazzino View Post
    Thanks everyone! These are very helpful. I was going to use the table saw, but I dont have a dado blade or dado insert yet. So I will give it a try with the router.
    Ignoring my Dado set for the table saw, I also have a blade that has a flat top. I purposely purchased this for times such as this. You can also use any blade, but, it may leave a less than desirable surface. In other words, you can use a regular blade as though it was a Dado blade. Try it on a bit of scrap and see what you get. You just have to reset the fence and take more passes. Again, I did purchase a specific flat topped blade for when I do this, but, just check to see what the top surface looks like. You might be OK with it, you might end up cleaning it up with a hand plane or sand paper. Multiple passes with a Dado blade also leaves "score marks". The router solution, however, should leave a clean surface.

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    make sure the opening is a little larger then the glass. Not too much but enough that seasonal wood movement does not put pressure on the glass as the wood shrinks. A 1/8" or less all around is probably plenty.
    Look at "Space Balls" for good information. I use a pinch of sawdust for my spacing needs for wooden panels.
    Bill D

  11. #11
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    Personally, when I think router, I think tear out. Light cuts help reduce the amount but figured woods and others with reversing grain directions are most problematic.

    I believe most, if not all, rip blades leave flat tops. The ATB crosscut and combination blades would likely need to be planed flat for your application since the surface would show. Not such a problem with picture frames where the milled surface is hidden.
    Rustic? Well, no. That was not my intention!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Michigan
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    1,195
    Just a caution on the table. To make it work as planned, first make a mockup of cardboard and tape to get the size right for the items to be displayed.

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