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Thread: Anchor seal substitute?

  1. #1
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    Anchor seal substitute?

    I was wondering if anyone has experience using latex paint as a substitute for Anchorseal to seal logs or turning blanks for air drying. I have various part cans of latex paint, but no Anchorseal. Would this work or just be a big mistake.. thank you, and stay safe and healthy.
    Fred

  2. #2
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    Fred, I have been cutting timber for woodturning since 1988, I have only ever used Acrylic or PVC paint, that's what we get down Under. I have never had a problem, I usually do 2 heavy coats. The only issue I have had was doing it on cracked blanks as the paint seeped into the cracks and showed up in the turning, making it harder to glue up the crack. Hope this helps.
    Rgds,
    Richard.

  3. #3
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    It works, not as well. Latex paint is quite permeable to water vapor so you need multiple thick coats to accomplish a similar effect. I'd rather spend my time turning than painting logs and Anchorseal is cheaper than good paint, so that's what I use. Cleanup is also easier-- I actually never clean my anchorseal brush as it doesn't harden. It's a little stiff at the beginning but quickly softens up, kind of like using a shellac brush.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by roger wiegand View Post
    It works, not as well. Latex paint is quite permeable to water vapor so you need multiple thick coats to accomplish a similar effect...
    I agree with Roger, based on reports and recommendations from experts over the years. I've read that oil-based and acrylic paints are better. Kiln recommendations sometimes include aluminum paint. Maybe borrow a little Anchorseal and try an experiment with wax vs your paint?

    Another thing people use for turning blanks is hot paraffin wax, applied usually by dipping. The usual safety requirements apply.

    If you don't have any Anchorseal because of availability, you can order directly from UC Coatings. https://uccoatings.com/products/anchorseal/ I once bought a 55-gal drum for use at my sawmill and in the shop, and to sell at cost to other turners. I know someone who bought a 5-gal drum. (I'm down to 2 or 3 gallons!) If you order Anchorseal the original formula is recommended over the newer Anchorseal 2. Woodcaft also carries it, called Green Wood Sealer the last time I checked. Expensive, though.

    If you don't have any because of the cost, try a local turning club. Some clubs buy Anchorseal in bulk and can sell it cheaper, for 1/2 to 1/3 the price of a gallon from Woodcraft or Amazon.

    BTW, over the years I've found the best way (for me) to use Anchorseal on logs and turning blanks. I put some in the bottom of a plastic coffee can and put a cheap disposable brush in the can. For shop when cutting turning blanks I put just an inch or so in the bottom. Since I prefer a thicker coating I leave the coffee can open for a few days until some of the water evaporates and the stuff goes on thicker. (A second thin coat doesn't seem to work as well since the wax in the dried first coat prevents applying the second coat evenly.) Just leave the brush in the coffee can and put the lid back on. The brush never needs cleaned.
    I've made up some "Genuine JKJ Anchorseal Kits" for friends and for fun at auctions and one guy told me recently he's still using his from years ago.

    BTW2, a great use for leftover exterior latex paint is on the outside beehive boxes. Different colors on the brood chambers may even make it easier for new foragers to recognize the hive when returning. Know any beekeepers?

    JKJ

  5. #5
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    I would think grafting seal would work well. It is designed to seal in the moisture. How about roofing paint?
    Bil lD

  6. #6
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    Our local club, the San Diego Woodturners, used to sell anchor seal until very recently. As a replacement, the club is recommending PVA (poly vinyl acetate or white wood glue). It is fairly thick and has some elasticity. And the price in the gallon jugs is not too different than anchorseal (or at least that is what I was told).

    I have occasionally used heated paraffin by dipping or brushing. I've also made a paste with paraffin and paint thinner that can be brushed on at room temp. Seems to work but when I turn the coated piece the shavings go on the floor and the floor gets pretty slippery.

  7. #7
    Saw a comment from Mike Mahoney who had just done a run of claro walnut bowls and he was using 'tree seal' which he said was like Elmer's glue. Maybe I can get a brand name from him, I will check. I have used titebond 2 on some madrone spindle blanks, and thus far, they have gone very oval, but no visible cracks. I will know more when I final turn them. Going on a box binge in a while...

    One way to seal ends of logs with the paint is to slop a couple of coats on, and then slap some newspaper or plastic on the tacky paint. I do remember hearing that one a long time ago. No idea whose idea that was.

    robo hippy

  8. #8
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    I had latex paint blister and pop off a couple of logs from moisture or sap. I'd keep an eye on it.

  9. #9
    craft supply sells artisan wood seal that is just like anchor seal but a little cheaper from what i was paying for the anchor seal. They have a free shipping deal going now.

  10. #10
    Never used the Craft Supply product, but interesting that it advertises that it promotes 50% faster drying time. I mean, the whole point of end grain coating is to slow drying. . .makes me think that what this really means is that the product is 50% less effective. . .

    It's not a bug, it's a feature!

    The description says it's PVA based, so this is the Elmer's glue path. . .not that it couldn't have other additives.

    I use the "Anchorseal II" because it's easy to get, works reasonably well, and is, I think, inexpensive. Highland Hardware has it for $20 a gallon, and it is stable in a paint can for years. It is not as effective as the original Anchorseal, but a little less nasty to work with. Effectiveness in preventing drying cracks in bowls is relative. If you have a roughout of a really problematic wood, then put two coats on the endgrain. I think the product labeling even suggests that. If you have voids that you're going to fill with epoxy or something like that later, then make sure you don't get Anchorseal down in the void or your fill won't stick well later. If you have any hairline cracks in the wood before you dry, wick some cyanoacrylate into those cracks before you Anchorseal. Anchorseal doesn't stick to cyanoacrylate, but that doesn't matter because cyanoacrylate itself will impede drying.

    Best,

    Dave

  11. #11
    Your talking about a different product that i was referencing. Thats the tree saver green wood sealer. I was talking about the artisan woodsealer.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Mount View Post
    Never used the Craft Supply product, but interesting that it advertises that it promotes 50% faster drying time. I mean, the whole point of end grain coating is to slow drying. . .makes me think that what this really means is that the product is 50% less effective. . .

    It's not a bug, it's a feature!

    The description says it's PVA based, so this is the Elmer's glue path. . .not that it couldn't have other additives.

    I use the "Anchorseal II" because it's easy to get, works reasonably well, and is, I think, inexpensive. Highland Hardware has it for $20 a gallon, and it is stable in a paint can for years. It is not as effective as the original Anchorseal, but a little less nasty to work with. Effectiveness in preventing drying cracks in bowls is relative. If you have a roughout of a really problematic wood, then put two coats on the endgrain. I think the product labeling even suggests that. If you have voids that you're going to fill with epoxy or something like that later, then make sure you don't get Anchorseal down in the void or your fill won't stick well later. If you have any hairline cracks in the wood before you dry, wick some cyanoacrylate into those cracks before you Anchorseal. Anchorseal doesn't stick to cyanoacrylate, but that doesn't matter because cyanoacrylate itself will impede drying.

    Best,

    Dave

  12. #12
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    Great conversation.. good ideas I like to turn green wood, but I have too much and I canít help myself..

  13. #13
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    After spending a fortune on sealers; I found tight bond original wood glue is great for sealing blanks and logs. I put two coats on and have not had a single blank crack! Anchor seal, still cracks unless you glob on 3 coats. At less than half the cost, I'll take the glue method.
    Where did I put those band aids?

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dueane Hicks View Post
    ... Anchor seal, still cracks unless you glob on 3 coats. At less than half the cost, I'll take the glue method.
    That might depend on a lot of factors, the wood, the geometry of the blank or turning, the initial moisture content, the temperature and relative humidity.

    I process a lot of green wood into turning blanks and dry them before use. I usually use one coat of anchorseal on the end grain except for special cases when I might coat some of the sides of the blank too. The success rate is very high with few cracks even on large blanks. (My largest are 10x10 and 12x12, maybe 12-14" tall. I do let my anchorseal thicken a bit before applying which may be a reason a single coat works well. I dry on wire shelves in my shop with heat and air conditioning but I don't adjust the thermostat to extremes in the summer or the winter.

  15. #15
    I chatted with Mike about his 'tree sealer'. He didn't give me a brand name other than just call it tree sealer. I googled that and came up with several products for sealing cuts on trees. Makes me wonder if mixing some Titebond and some laytex paint would work.... Would it be any better than just the Titebond?

    robo hippy

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