Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 23 of 23

Thread: tearout on plywood

  1. #16
    I'm in the scoring pass camp. I don't even do a 16th, just enough to shave off the veneer. The key is to plan for easy reliability between setups. I'll usually clock my handwheel so I can raise and lower to the same heights easily.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Winnipeg
    Posts
    5
    I've had pretty good luck with painters tape, but the other suggestions are solid

  3. #18
    They make negative hook dadoes for plywood. The blade on the bottom is from one of my regular sets, the blade on top is from a plywood set. The outside chipper on the bottom blade leans well forward, on the top blade the teeth lean backwards. Your material needs to be decent quality. I havent bought dadoe sets for years but all of them were likely 225.00 - 250.00 Can a set and im going way back.



    P1150831A.jpg
    Last edited by Warren Lake; 03-30-2020 at 5:00 AM.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Location
    Lafayette, CA
    Posts
    305
    Johnny Means sums it up for me. Set up the fence for the cut. Raise the blade just enough to kiss the sheet. Run it through, making the very slightest of scoring lines. You should then be able to raise the blade for the full dado depth and get no tearout.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Doylestown, PA
    Posts
    6,073
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Jones 5443 View Post
    Johnny Means sums it up for me. Set up the fence for the cut. Raise the blade just enough to kiss the sheet. Run it through, making the very slightest of scoring lines. You should then be able to raise the blade for the full dado depth and get no tearout.
    I do that when cutting melamine. I use a triple chip grind blade and make a very shallow pass first then cut off. My dado has the little 'bat ears' I think they're called. I think my next dados are going to be cut with a router. I made a jig that when used in conjunction with a top bearing 1/2" X 1/2" straight bit cuts very clean dados. The jig enables me to set the dado width to the plywood as long as the dado is at least 1/2". There's a jig that uses a bushing but works similarly. I haven't messed with that one yet.

  6. #21


    https://www.amazon.com/Freud-Super-Dado-Sets-SD508/dp/B00004RK0P


    All of the suggestions are right on. But a dado set designed for veneered plywood is a good start. I found that expensive old stock birch plywood from my lumber yard had more chip out than cheaper poplar core plywood. The fir core or the gluing process seemed to chip out even with a dado blade designed for melamine or veneer plywood.
    Ask a woodworker to "make your bed" and he/she makes a bed.

  7. #22
    For shelving, why use a dado anyway? Butt joints with biscuits , splines or dominos are sufficiently strong.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    52,309
    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Jenness View Post
    For shelving, why use a dado anyway? Butt joints with biscuits , splines or dominos are sufficiently strong.
    Dados likely are stronger and help to deal with racking, but even if that isn't the case (pardon the expression... ) there is the appearance factor. Some folks like the look of the exposed joinery; some do not. That's subjective.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •