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Thread: Miter saw station/router table combo

  1. #1

    Miter saw station/router table combo

    So I've got an idea to build a miter saw station in my garage. I wish I could post a picture of what I drew up but my laptop is being repaired. It would be similar to this: https://images.app.goo.gl/zP5u1d6trYY5FFF69

    But it'll be a 5' cabinet on the left, miter saw, and a 3' router table. All will be 2' deep. I can get used 1/2" x4'x8' mdo sheets for $20. They're oldsigns and have minimal screw holes. I was planning on painting the cabinets anyways, so the current paint wouldn't be an issue. I was just curious if 1/2" would be sturdy enough. Thoughts? Thanks ahead of time!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    52,314
    Rob, I use .5" material for the high-end equestrian tack (equipment) trunks I build for folks and have for years. The material is strong, especially once it becomes a box. I use #7 trim head screws, glue and butt joints for these items. The screws get covered with thin overlays for my trunk design, but I used the same technique for my upper kitchen cabinets with a .25" MDF overlay on the end panel. You can easily put in additional bracing with strips of the .5" material and glue...IE, you can make it as strong as you want to. Yes, .75" material will be stronger than .5", but a good design will make for a decent project outcome. And $20 a sheet for MDO is a REALLY good deal, even if slightly used. It's good stuff and has exterior rated adhesives in it.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Doylestown, PA
    Posts
    6,073
    If you plan on using a router plate or lift you might want to double the portion a few inches beyond the router plate opening. Most router plates & lifts are 1/4" thick or more so would leave only 1/4" for the plate to rest on. You could also strengthen the opening with hardwood or metal but I think you'd need something.

  4. #4
    Thanks for the quick responses!!
    Jim, thanks for all the info. I was debating on rabbet joints, but figured there just isn't enough material to create a stronger joint, and after reading your technique glue and screws is definitely the way I'll go.
    Curt, I was going to double up on the top, for a total of 1" thick. Figured the 3/4" or so would be pretty strong under the router. And then add some hardwood trim on the edge to clean it up. I figured, "why not make it look a little nice?"

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    52,314
    A carcass with .5" backs inset will be very strong and you can absolutely double up the top. Doing that can also span across cabinet carcasses, locking them together. Whatever the base is you use will reinforce the bottoms for you. Don't do traditional toe-kicks...make a completely separate base, with or without casters to support the structure of the multiple carcasses across the entire unit. Use drawers instead of doors for both easier storage and even more stability.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #6
    Perfect! I was planning on setting the back a few inches in so i could run a shop vac hose behind everything and it be concealed. Also it gives space for any electrical. I planned on having shallow drawers behind doors and have some shelves, very similar to the woodwhisperers shop cabinets. And I was planning on doing the toekicks as they're own box too. 2x3's with 1/2" mdo on top of it. I figured it was easier to level a small box rather than the cabinets. Also going to make the 3 sections completely separate, and attaching them together with a just a few screws. This way when I move out of the rental home, they'll be much easier to move with me. Thanks for reassuring me that the build will work and I'm on the right path!

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