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Thread: So which stocks will be positively affected after Covid-19 ?

  1. #1
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    So which stocks will be positively affected after Covid-19 ?

    So does anyone think there will be some stocks positively affected by Covid-19?
    Two come to mind:
    -Zoom- which is a teleconferencing application currently used by many
    -Teladoc-which is a medical application used to examine and talk to patients remotely
    Both are pretty popular right now but will they continue to be popular after Covid-19?
    I know, I know, stick with index funds/ETFs, but this is much more interesting, if not more profitable.
    Thoughts/suggestions?
    Dennis

  2. #2
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    There undoubtedly will be some real winners, but as you state, things can and will change after we get through this current situation. That said, my personal feeling is that Telemedicine is getting a good boost that will not prove it's worth and cost effectiveness which may make it a more acceptable practice once things return to normal. A lot of that will depend upon the for profit insurance industry, unfortunately.... As to Zoom, they have an interesting history. There's a good article on CNN.com about them and how the founder's goal when he left Cisco's WebEx team was to actually address end-users' concerns about usability, etc. They have done pretty well around that, although there are a few security things that need addressed. But I think they were do fine, even if things contract a bit after the current situation. What will potentially benefit them is that more employers and educators will be more comfortable with remote work/learning than were previously. This has been a cultural problem in business for a long time...trust me, I was selling collaboration solutions to government and business prior to retirement, and the biggest barrier was not technology.

    That all said...I'm sticking to the funds my money is in. I don't have the time or interest in doing the work required to deal in individual securities.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #3
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    Clorox is not doing anything special.
    Blue apron home meal kit company went up 75% then 125% the next day. Then it dropped back to the before numbers.
    I suspect the toilet paper makers stock will drop as soon as everyone has a years supply on hand and stop buying for a year.
    Bil lD

  4. #4
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    Funeral home stocks......Rod

  5. #5
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    Costco sells caskets and urns, online only. I assume one at a time, not in a family pack. they have done this for several years.
    Bil lD

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    Costco sells caskets and urns, online only. I assume one at a time, not in a family pack. they have done this for several years.
    Bil lD
    “Not in family packs”

    Gee Bill, thanks for the dark humour, it made me laugh.

    Keep well.....Rod

  7. #7
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    There's a site called MarketWatch that's suggesting Pepsico, Johnson& Johnson and Proctor & Gamble. No doubt our Senators have already bought them up.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stan Calow View Post
    There's a site called MarketWatch that's suggesting Pepsico, Johnson& Johnson and Proctor & Gamble. No doubt our Senators have already bought them up.

    I bought a fair bit of Pepsi so I was fully ready for the zombie apocalypse.
    I am in love with Montana. For other states I have admiration, respect, recognition, even some affection, but with Montana it is love.... It seems to me that Montana is a great splash of grandeur....the mountains are the kind I would create if mountains were ever put on my agenda. Montana seems to me to be what a small boy would think Texas is like from hearing Texans. Montana has a spell on me. It is grandeur and warmth. Of all the states it is my favorite and my love.

    John Steinbeck


  9. #9
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    Do zombies like sugary drinks?
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  10. #10
    Funeral Homes. Seems most are now owned by investment groups.

  11. #11
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    Forget trying to pick winner stocks, odds are against you. Just invest in index mutual funds and ride the market average. You will sleep better and have better returns if you are a long term investor.

  12. #12
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    Julian, I’m not exactly sure of your credentials in the financial advisory area, but there are many very smart investors here (and I’m not including myself) who pick individual stocks/bonds etc. who regularly beat the overall averages, without the “benefit” of mutual fund managers and highly commissioned sales persons.
    Young enough to remember doing it;
    Old enough to wish I could do it again.

  13. #13
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    I take Julian's advice in the best possible way - it's what my friends often say to me. I think investing, like any aspect of our daily lives, has a strong case to be made for outsourcing to experts (as with cooking, yard care, furniture making).

    As for this current situation I have two thoughts a short term and a longer term (I do my own investing both stocks and funds):
    1. Silver is crazy undervalued right now, in my opinion. This is due to a complex set of circumstances ranging from Silver's traditional role hedging inflation to some fallout (April 1, 2020 forced sell dates) from the silver market manipulation case of a certain European bank. The difference between the "spot" price of silver and what I can buy a physical ounce in my town is over %100 and has been for some time. The April 1 deadline passing today, I see only upward pressure on silver for the short term (I mean weeks, not years). I think that after the 2016 Deutsche bank case other bad actors will be unlikely to manipulate silver again any time soon. These rigged markets and naked silver short selling tactics kept a lid on silver for 15 years or more that should not have been there.

    2. Ford. I missed the opportunity to buy Ford for under $2 back in 2009 and it has troubled my sleep more than once (to Julian's point). I think a similar opportunity exists today (I have not yet jumped into this pool). You are betting on a future - if the US .gov has a "some things are too big to fail" mindset the big 3 autos are surely in that category. This would be a longer-term play obviously - masks are not going to be highly profitable once the cost of re-tooling is factored. Masks are the right thing to do, and I like it when companies do the right thing.

    I'm a small time player with AUM that would fit in a nice overnight bag but I often beat the markets, especially in times like these when the Trading Algorithms were not coded to deal with a pandemic. This whole situation is a disaster with an end-date. That known ending (in a few months) combined with our rich global information environment could make for a whip-fast recovery. Plus, right or wrong the POTUS likes the markets and the markets love him.
    Last edited by Devon Prescott; 04-01-2020 at 8:35 PM.

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron Rosenthal View Post
    Julian, I’m not exactly sure of your credentials in the financial advisory area, but there are many very smart investors here (and I’m not including myself) who pick individual stocks/bonds etc. who regularly beat the overall averages, without the “benefit” of mutual fund managers and highly commissioned sales persons.
    Aaron,
    I too have no idea what Julian's credentials are, but his advice pretty much mirrors what Warren Buffett tells people to do and Warren's credentials are beyond question.
    Being able to be a good enough stock picker to consistently beat the market averages is a rare talent, meaning the average person cannot do it consistently. Therefore I am in Julian's camp that thinks it dangerous to advise others to enter the game of individual stock/bond picking, especially in this day and age of efficient markets and algorithmic trading.
    For those that are willing and able to consistently pick winners, consider yourselves gifted, talented, smart, lucky or all of the above.

    Also, I don't think Julian is necessarily saying go hire a commissioned salesperson. There are any number of trading platforms that will let you buy index funds and mutual funds at relatively expense ratios. I think Schwab does a great job of making a non-commissioned person available on a walk-in basis for those that need help getting started.
    Last edited by Edwin Santos; 04-01-2020 at 12:35 PM.

  15. #15
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    hmm... Hard to pick winners but maybe losers? The real question is how our collective behavior might change over the long term.

    Take movies. My wife and I haven't gone to a movie in the theater since this started. Will we go back? maybe. But I bet we lean more to the upscale theaters with the bigger seats and rows farther apart. Theaters were already having a hard time competing against streaming services and such. So that would mean to sell AMC short and buy home theater stuff.

    Or cruise travel. Will people ever look at cruise ships the same. We always knew they were petri dishes. So short Carnival

    What about travel in general? Will we finally stop traveling by air and support medium distance travel by rail? I love traveling by train and loath traveling by air. Business 101 is, "You can't depend on the loyalty of a customer base that actively hates you." That pretty much describes the airlines. Will this be the final straw or will airlines figure out a way to freshen the air in the planes so maybe we don't all get sick? If not, short the airlines and buy railroad and auto stocks.

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