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Thread: Looking for Books

  1. #1
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    Looking for Books

    Greetings,
    Didn't really know where to put it so i would request the mods to please move it to the right place. Most topics and similar questions I've come across were either quite old or very specific.

    Anyways given current circumstances there is plenty of time for reading so I'm looking to get some new Books. In terms of Topics really anything, be it Tools, General things around the shop, Joinery, Carving, Finishing etc, that said something on traditional chinese and japanese furniture would be nice to have.
    Really looking to create a sort of list of books to read and add to the library in the future.

    Long story short, whats your favorite books out there?


    Regards Philipp

  2. #2
    Hi there. If I remember correctly, you are in an apprentice program in Austria. It seems like YOU should be suggesting good books to US, because you are getting to be quite skilled by now Philipp.

    There are several threads in the archives with good books. You could search for them to add to your list. One that I like a lot is Understanding Wood Finishes, by Robert Flexner. Another is Mouldings in Practice, by MS Bickford. Finally, I like By Hand and Eye, written by Walker and Tolpin. (It teaches design.) Everything else that I liked is going to be far too simple for your skill level. (I am a hobbyist, not a professional.)

    Best regards,
    Fred
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."
    - Sir Edmund Burke

  3. #3
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    You may try to contact Brian Holcombe at his website to see if he has any input on Japanese furniture sources.
    David

  4. #4
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    Thanks for the Replies,

    Ha Frederick I didnt think anyone would even remember that, been a journeyman a while now. The reality of daily life in the job is a far cry from the romanticised artisan making everything to perfection, not much time for books I'm afraid. Anyways definetly gonna put those Books on the List, especially "By Hand and Eye" sounds very interessting.

    Also i dont think simple Books or ones aimed at beginners are necessarily a bad read even if you are skilled, theres quite the contrast between the Hobbyist and Commercial worlds after all.

    Thats not a bad idea David, thanks.

    Regards Philipp

  5. #5
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    Go to the library and look at old woodworking magazines.

  6. #6
    Morse,
    Japanese Homes and their Surroundings
    a 19th century classic with pen and ink drawings by a Westerner sojourning in Japan

    Handler,
    Ming Furniture
    beautiful photography, classic designs

    Ecke,
    Chinese Domestic Furniture
    detailed description with measurements, sketchy photography

    Berliner & Cooke,
    Inspired by China
    historic examples juxtaposed with modern interpretations of Chinese furniture

    Wright & Pai
    Korean Furniture
    an interesting intersection of Chinese and Japanese influences, great photography

    Chris Hall,
    The Art of Japanese Carpentry Drawing
    , multiple volumes in e-book format,
    https://thecarpentryway.blog


    Joyce,
    Encyclopedia of Furnituremaking
    a classic reference of European joinery

    Meyerson,
    Makepeace
    modern furniture design eye candy

    Ingham,
    Cutting Edge Cabinetmaking
    innovative furniture and box making technique

    Grove,
    Advanced Veneering
    what it is

    Peabody Essex Museum,
    Audacious: the Fine Art of Wood
    exceptional wood art

    Norbury,
    The Art of Ian Norbury
    ​ unique wood sculpture






  7. #7
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    By all means, try to get a hold of a copy of George Nakashima's Soul of a Tree...it's pretty thought provoking. It can be hard to find, however. Thos Moser's books are also favorites of mine.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  8. #8
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    Understanding Wood, by Bruce Hoadley.

  9. #9
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    I would like to recommend a book called The unknown craftsman.
    One caution it might upset your thoughts on beauty in your craft.
    If you have a fragile ego probably shouldn’t read it.

    Good Luck
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Aj

  10. #10
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    Thats one of the downsides of living in the middle of nowhere , well stocked libraries arent really a thing here (not that they would be currently open anyways) still thanks Iowell.

    Thats quite the selection there to browse through, thanks Kevin.

    I can imagine that Nakashima makes some interessting points, thanks Jim. I'll keep an eye out for it, will have to look up on Moser though haven't heard of that one before.

    Sounds like one of my apprenticeship textbooks, put it on the list. Thanks Jamie.

    Oh now this one sounds really interessting Andrew, especially given the circumstances and stand of technology during which some pieces were made throughout history. Definetly putting that on the list, thanks.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Philipp Jaindl View Post

    I can imagine that Nakashima makes some interessting points, thanks Jim. I'll keep an eye out for it, will have to look up on Moser though haven't heard of that one before.
    Here are some pointers for Thos Moser...

    https://smile.amazon.com/Moser-Legac...5517200&sr=8-2

    https://smile.amazon.com/Thos-Moser-...5517172&sr=8-4

    https://smile.amazon.com/How-Build-S...5517200&sr=8-5

    https://smile.amazon.com/Mosers-Meas...5517200&sr=8-6

    https://smile.amazon.com/Thomas-Mose...5517200&sr=8-9

    https://smile.amazon.com/Thos-Moser-...517200&sr=8-12
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  12. #12
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    Noted, will browse through them, thanks again Jim.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jamie Buxton View Post
    Understanding Wood, by Bruce Hoadley.
    +1.

    Also, in the elementary and goes without saying category, "Tage Frid Teaches Woodworking: Two Volumes In One. A little off the beaten path but excellent for the pro,
    "Beyond The Basics...Advanced Kitchen Design; Ellen Cheever, CKD, National Kitchen and Bath Assoc., 1992.

  14. #14
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    You might want to get on Patrick Leach's mailing list. He is at http://www.supertool.com (hope I got that hyperlink correct). He puts out an email at the first of the month of the items he has for sale; usually lots of old classic hand tools but occasionally some books. First come, first serve on the items, definitely old school on the way he operates. Anyway, he has had some good, older woodworking books listed for sale. Usually, from the 1940-1970 timeframe. I've picked up some Charles Hayward books from the 60's and some others just can't remember them off the top of my head. You can email him and tell him what you are looking for and he would probably recommend some titles and look for them while he is making purchases.

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