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Thread: End grain and my LN 60 1/2 R block plane, and other troubles..warning, long read...

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    End grain and my LN 60 1/2 R block plane, and other troubles..warning, long read...

    I have not postet for a while. Been away from woodworking due to having to little kids.

    Now im back in a new house and im in the process of setting up my workshop. Im lucky to have a heated floor and about 40 M2.

    So Im going to build the English Workbench aka Nicholson bench.
    But before I do that im building some saw horses, Im building them timber frame style so I can practice my joining skills, which are at the moment almost not excisting.

    Yesterday I cut the pre-planed 3x3" pine boards I bought for the saw horses. Im still learning to cut straight to a line, so the ends needed a bit of clean up.

    Out comes my LN 60 1/2 R block plane with A2 iron, which I bought years ago, but only rarely used.

    I thought it was perfect for endgrain..... No magic... OK, maybe its not sharp enough. Checked the back of the iron and I can see a small...What I now know was a wear bevel (because I googled it)....what to do?? Google google google.... The fast solution was using the ruler trick. I could not bare the thought of flattening that back every time I had to sharpen it.
    Then I sharpened the bevel at 25 degrees because thats the way it comes from the factory and it must be right then. The edge kept chipping, just tiny little chips. I used my almost never used Spydercos, which I had for years. I remember it almost took ages to flatten them on my DMT lapping plate, which in the end killed it...that raised the price of these spydercos considerbly. Im using them dry because I heard that was the way to use them, but I could see little metal flakes getting embedded in the stone, so I might have done that wrong too...
    nevertheless, edge chipping...google google google....so now it turns out that A2 is not suitable of a 25 degrees bevel....it should be 30 or even more...

    Now im really confused If I sharpen to 30 degrees, the angle of attack is now 42 degrees, almost the same as a normal pitch...then I guess I could just as well try to use a no 4 for the end grain or what ??

    Am I missing a point ?
    Best regards

    Lasse Hilbrandt

  2. #2
    A #4 plane is better for this because you can use both hands and you are not doing so much with your fingers. You can get a little block plane to work but your hands will get tired much faster.

  3. #3
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    Isnít the block plane bevel up and the no 4 bevel down. What ever plane gets the job done to your satisfaction is right.
    Conifers can be tricky because of how the fibers are soft hard soft hard.
    Good Luck
    Aj

  4. #4
    I sharpen my a2s at 25 and donít have an issue. Has the blade not been sharpened many times?

  5. #5
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    My LN #62 Low Angle Jack Plane is used for shooting. With a 25ļ bevel the blade does tend to chip more than my old Stanley Low Angle Block Planes with O1 steel blades.

    My current plan is to purchase a Lee Valley Left Hand Shooting Plane. It currently shows as out of stock. Haven't figured out whether it will be with an O1 or PMv11 blade. Maybe buy a spare blade of the other material.

    Another thought is about using a rabbet plane for shooting end grain. My rabbet planes tend to get used only for the purpose for which they were made. This saves the blade in the long run. My LN LA Block isn't used as often for end grain as my Stanley LA Blocks.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  6. #6
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    Hone a 25* bevel with maybe a tiny secondary bevel. Wet the end grain with mineral spirits or alcohol. Take slicing cuts with the plane. Youíll be fine.
    Sharp solves all manner of problems.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
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    Something weird is going on if the blade keeps chipping during sharpening. I've had A2 chip in use plenty of times but it sharpens well enough. I finish A2 on a Spyderco UF and I'm pretty sure I've used diamond stones before, so normal A2 should handle those stones.

    I sharpen my 60-1/2 at 25 degrees, it holds up ok for me. Eventually it will accumulate enough microchips that I have to resharpen.

    But a sharp #4 will do this job as well.

  8. #8
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    I sometimes use a rasp and sandpaper on end grain.

  9. #9
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    I would use the #4. Block planes are small and tiring to hold. It is my understanding that A2 likes a 30* bevel and tends to chip at lower angles. I am not a Spyderco using guy, but would not a spritz of (slightly) soapy water be better than a dry stone? maybe a Spyderco guy will follow this up. As they say, a sharp edge fixes nearly everything.
    David

  10. #10
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    Use a #4. If you want better life from A2 I've read that 35deg is an option. I have next to no experience with A2, I have tried it but didn't really like it. Derek has done a lot with just about every steel and hopefully he could share his view.

  11. #11
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    Is it safe to conclude that using an A2 iron in an low angle plane is foolish if the goal is to plane end grain with a low angle of attack ?
    Best regards

    Lasse Hilbrandt

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lasse Hilbrandt View Post
    Is it safe to conclude that using an A2 iron in an low angle plane is foolish if the goal is to plane end grain with a low angle of attack ?
    No. Lots of people do it.

    Like I said, there is something weird going on with your iron.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lasse Hilbrandt View Post
    Is it safe to conclude that using an A2 iron in an low angle plane is foolish if the goal is to plane end grain with a low angle of attack ?
    I don't think that is a safe conclusion, but then I am only a beginner at this. All of my BU and BD planes have the A2 blade, and I have no problem taking very fine shavings from end grain walnut or maple with my 60-1/2 block plane.

    I make sure my plane iron is as flat as I can get it using a 800-grit water stone. I use a Sharpie permanent marker to put a grid pattern on the back of the iron When the grid is uniformly removed, the back is flat. Fortunately, all of my LN plane irons are flat from the factory, so I'm really only removing the factory grinding marks and adding my own from the water stone. This is a personal choice and others might claim this is a waste of time, but I'm satisfied with the results and don't think I will ever have to be worried about it again.

    I use the Tormek to put a 25-degree primary hollow bevel on the front. Then I use the 800-grit water stone to put a 33-degree secondary bevel and also establish a slight camber. As soon as I have a continuous wire edge on the blade, I use the 10,000-grit stone to create a 35-degree polished edge. The final step is the Ruler Trick on the back using the 10,000-grit stone.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lasse Hilbrandt View Post

    Yesterday I cut the pre-planed 3x3" pine boards I bought for the saw horses. Im still learning to cut straight to a line, so the ends needed a bit of clean up.
    I would practice my saw skills. I spent a lot of time early on trying to do saw stuff with a plane, chisel stuff with a plane, etc. Your handsaws can cut a straight enough line to do the joinery on a sawbench, and the sooner you get your skills to the point where you can make them do that the less frustrated you will be.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lasse Hilbrandt View Post
    Is it safe to conclude that using an A2 iron in an low angle plane is foolish if the goal is to plane end grain with a low angle of attack ?

    .... Then I sharpened the bevel at 25 degrees because thats the way it comes from the factory and it must be right then. The edge kept chipping, just tiny little chips. I used my almost never used Spydercos, which I had for years. I remember it almost took ages to flatten them on my DMT lapping plate, which in the end killed it...that raised the price of these spydercos considerbly. Im using them dry because I heard that was the way to use them, but I could see little metal flakes getting embedded in the stone, so I might have done that wrong too...
    Lasse, the LN rebate block plane is a nice plane. But I do not use it for end grain. I do not see it as an alternative to a low angle block plane. The mouth is wide, and it is different to set a fine projection. Where mine gets use is across the grain when fine tuning drawer cases ...



    The blade is A2 and has a 25 degree bevel.

    That said, I have used A2 blades with 25 degree bevels in shooting planes for a very long time, and never experienced any problems. I have both LN and Veritas low angle block planes, and they are both good in this respect. A2 is just fine at 25 degrees.

    So why is yours not working? I am not sure, but I suspect it may lie with the sharpening. You say that you used the Ruler Trick. I wonder what angle that created. A true RT creates a bevel about 1/3 of a degree. It should not impact on the performance of a block plane. How did you create yours? With a thin, steel ruler, or eye ball it?

    Regards the Spydercos, I never use them dry. All honing media need some liquid to carry away the swarf, otherwise the surface clogs up, and stop cutting. I use soapy water, or water on mine.

    Regards from Perth

    Derek

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