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Thread: Grizzly G0800 Indexing Pulley

  1. #1

    Grizzly G0800 Indexing Pulley

    When trying to get a stuck faceplate off the spindle, I put the faceplate wrench on and gave it a sharp whack. Unfortunately, the locking pin apparently was not seated all the way in one of the holes in the pulley/indexing plate. The indexing plate now has about six positions (next to one another) whereby the pin will not seat correctly in the holes. I believe the only remedy is to replace the pulley/indexing plate. Has anyone done this? Can you give me an idea of what's involved to do the replacement. Thanks.

  2. #2
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    Depending on how much torque you tend to apply, could you possibly fill the damaged holes with epoxy and bore out appropriately?

  3. #3
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    I would call Grizzley customer service.

  4. #4
    Eugene - I could get epoxy onto the plate, but there isn't access to bore out the holes with the plate on the spindle.

    Dwight - I did contact Grizzly tech support. The gent I spoke with gave me information, but he has never removed the pulley. Thus, my inquiry for anyone who has done it.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Edward Weingarden View Post
    Eugene - I could get epoxy onto the plate, but there isn't access to bore out the holes with the plate on the spindle.

    Dwight - I did contact Grizzly tech support. The gent I spoke with gave me information, but he has never removed the pulley. Thus, my inquiry for anyone who has done it.
    Edward, if for some reason it is difficult or costly to repair, have you considered an indexing plate accessory? I use the Alisam: http://www.alisam.com/large-indexing-systems.html
    I have no idea what the indexer on your lathe is like but those on my Powermatic and Jet lathes are horrible to use and limited in the divisions.

    JKJ

  6. #6
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    I went to the parts list and stared at the diagram. From your description, it appears that you damaged part #148, spindle pulley. In order to replace it, I think you need to remove the spindle. But that also involves removing the handwheel, bearings and some other things. Before starting, ask griz for the procedure for replacing the bearings. Perhaps you can re-use the bearings but in any case, the instructions will guide you in re-assembling it all.

    I tried to look up the price for the pulley with the indexing plate and it said that the part was no longer available and was replaced with P0799148. But the G0799 appears to have been discontinued. I suspect that Griz tech support can help sort this out.

    What I find surprising is that the indexing pin is being used as a spindle lock. On the G0766, there is a threaded hole in the right hand end of the head stock in which you screw in a pin that goes into a hole in the spindle.

  7. #7
    John K - thanks for that information and link; I was unaware of such an option. I'll have to research it further to see what's involved for the installation.

    Brice - thanks for doing a little research on the part. I'll have to talk to tech support re: the part availability. My Jet 1642 had the threaded hole for the pin.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Edward Weingarden View Post
    John K - thanks for that information and link; I was unaware of such an option. I'll have to research it further to see what's involved for the installation.
    Installation is simple: slip the disk on the lathe spindle and fasten with a nut they supply or a chuck. The indexing pin is mounted on a magnetic base. People doing fluted work especially love these indexers.

    JKJ

  9. #9
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    John, is it common that the indexing pin is used to unscrew a stuck chuck? On my G0766, I've got a 3/8" (metric equiv) stud that positively locks into the end of the spindle. When I looked at the graphics the holes in the indexing pulley looked kind of anemic. They are small in diameter and not particularly deep. So, if I had a stuck chuck the LAST thing that I would want would be small and shallow depth "dimple" holes.

    I've heard so many good things about the G0800, but using the indexing pin to unlock a stuck chuck, looks like a weak point of that lathe. Roger - - what are your thoughts?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brice Rogers View Post
    John, is it common that the indexing pin is used to unscrew a stuck chuck? On my G0766, I've got a 3/8" (metric equiv) stud that positively locks into the end of the spindle. When I looked at the graphics the holes in the indexing pulley looked kind of anemic. They are small in diameter and not particularly deep. So, if I had a stuck chuck the LAST thing that I would want would be small and shallow depth "dimple" holes.

    I've heard so many good things about the G0800, but using the indexing pin to unlock a stuck chuck, looks like a weak point of that lathe. Roger - - what are your thoughts?
    I've never used any kind of indexing pin to hold the spindle while unscrewing a chuck. I remember a picture of a casting broken that way. I do use the spindle locks on my lathes and a wrench to remove a chuck. The spindle locks are sufficiently strong.

    I have used the indexing pin on the Jet 1642 and PM 3520b to hold a piece in one position while I scraped or sanded by hand. This put almost no force on the lathe. (These days, I take the piece, chuck and all, off the lathe for scraping, sanding, and finishing.)

    In my opinion, the so-called indexing methods on these lathes is a joke. You have to keep the chart handy showing which holes to use for the divisions they have provided for.

    JKJ

  11. Quote Originally Posted by Brice Rogers View Post

    I've heard so many good things about the G0800, but using the indexing pin to unlock a stuck chuck, looks like a weak point of that lathe. Roger - - what are your thoughts?
    I've never had the first problem with getting a faceplate or a chuck stuck on my G0800. The spindle lock is spring loaded, and when in lock position it does go into the pulley, but that seems to me to be a straight forward design. The only time I ever had a real problem with a stuck chuck was on my first lathe, a Craftsman 15"VS, which used gearing instead of belts an pulleys to drive the spindle............I stripped out the drive gear, and with no parts available on planet earth basically turned that lathe into scrap metal.

    I think technique is important as I never tighten down a faceplate or a chuck, but simply mate the surfaces together with a little "snap" right at the end of threading them on the spindle. I did get a chuck stuck on my former 60698, which has the same pin and hole configuration as our G0766, but a strap wrench took care of it. For the G0766, and G0733, I would recommend using the bottom hole in the headstock around the spindle and screw the threaded end of the pin all the way down......this will give one the most metal to support the torque against the force of getting it unstuck. I know Fred Belknap from WVa. broke the casting on his G0698.

    It also would be a good idea to take a synthetic sanding pad and debur all surfaces, clean the threads in the inserts from time to time, as sometimes dust, finishes, oils, especially from wet sanding can spread into nooks and crannies, and gum up threads or make them more prone to sticking.
    Last edited by Roger Chandler; 03-28-2020 at 8:04 AM.
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Chandler View Post
    ...
    It also would be a good idea to take a synthetic sanding pad and debur all surfaces, clean the threads in the inserts from time to time, as sometimes dust, finishes, oils, especially from wet sanding can spread into nooks and crannies, and gum up threads or make them more prone to sticking.
    That's a good point. Why the synthetic sanding pad, is there less chance of grit breaking breaking loose?

    I use a brass wire brush occasionally to clean spindle threads, usually with the lathe running at a slow speed, sometimes a bit of compressed air. I have occasionally lubricated the threads of a chuck with a very small amount of dry lube. I also use the wrist snap method when mounting a chuck. The chuck never gets stuck and is always removable with a chuck wrench.

  13. A brass brush to clean threads is a good idea...I also do that, but do use synthetic sanding pads to clean up the spindle shoulder and sometimes run a corner down into the insert to clean.
    Remember, in a moments time, everything can change!

    Vision - not just seeing what is, but seeing what can be!




  14. #14
    Here's the update - I started by trying to identify the "bruised" indexing holes. I couldn't find them by visual inspection so I went through the process of putting the indexing pin in each hole, until I found those that the pin wouldn't seat properly in. During the process I noted that sometimes the spring in the pin apparatus did not move the pin into the hole all the way. Once I made that discovery, I made sure the pin went completely into each hole. Thus, it looks like my pulley/indexing plate is intact. Now, when I move the pin advancement lever to lock the spindle, I make sure the pin is properly seated.

  15. Quote Originally Posted by Edward Weingarden View Post
    Here's the update - I started by trying to identify the "bruised" indexing holes. I couldn't find them by visual inspection so I went through the process of putting the indexing pin in each hole, until I found those that the pin wouldn't seat properly in. During the process I noted that sometimes the spring in the pin apparatus did not move the pin into the hole all the way. Once I made that discovery, I made sure the pin went completely into each hole. Thus, it looks like my pulley/indexing plate is intact. Now, when I move the pin advancement lever to lock the spindle, I make sure the pin is properly seated.
    Good move, Ed...glad you got it worked out with not much damage!
    Remember, in a moments time, everything can change!

    Vision - not just seeing what is, but seeing what can be!




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