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Thread: Recommendations for bench top planer and disc/belt sander

  1. #1
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    Recommendations for bench top planer and disc/belt sander

    Planning to add a bench top planer and disc/belt sander to shop. What is recommended? Would like to mount both units on a flip top mobile stand. I would like to obtain plans and recommendations for the stand. Thanks in advance for your recommendations.

    Jon

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    West Lafayette, IN
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    Lots of info out there on flip top stands. Do some searching here and on google for more information.

    I liked my Dewalt DW734 planer a lot. Had it for a long time and it worked great, nice finish.

    Im not a big fan of belt/disc sanders. Especially the small ones. Disc is too small for most anything and the belt isnt great either. Id suggest a Ridgid OSS/belt sander instead, and a bigger disc sander (12+) down the road.

  3. #3
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    Jul 2016
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    Lebanon, TN
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    I made this one a few years back for a DW735 and DW780










  4. #4
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    The one thing to keep in mind if you're going to use a flip-top type stand is that you'll want to choose your machines carefully so they are "reasonably" close in weight. Benchtop planers are not generally super heavy (although the Dewalt is pretty beefy) so when you're choosing the combo sander, the weight specification will be important. A 6x48"/12" combo sander, which are generally really heavy will be out of the question, but a smaller one should fit the bill.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
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    Northern California
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    I strongly endorse the Dewalt 735 planer. Home Depot had a great deal on it last year with the dedicated Dewalt stand, so I dont have a flip-top for it. I am going to build a flip-top for my two grinders (one set up with buffer/wire wheel) while this Coronavirus lockdown is in effect. As Matt noted, lots of info on flip-tops, especially on YouTube.

    On a separate stand I have an old Craftsman belt/disc sander - 6x48 belt, 9 disc, all cast iron - powered by a huge 80 year old GE 1hp motor that weighs more than the sander and the sander is heavy. Its a decent sander for my needs. If you want to go the vintage route theyre readily available on Craigslist and yard/garage sales, which is where I purchased mine.

  6. #6
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    Thanks Jim. Good advice.

  7. #7
    I also have the Dewalt 735 planer. I like it but it’s really loud. My sound meter registered in the 90dB range when planing. Noticeably louder than the Delta 12 1/2” planer it replaced.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    The one thing to keep in mind if you're going to use a flip-top type stand is that you'll want to choose your machines carefully so they are "reasonably" close in weight. Benchtop planers are not generally super heavy (although the Dewalt is pretty beefy) so when you're choosing the combo sander, the weight specification will be important. A 6x48"/12" combo sander, which are generally really heavy will be out of the question, but a smaller one should fit the bill.
    I wouldn't necessarily put too much thought into it. I have a flip top station for my Dewalt 735 with nothing else on the other side. When not in use it tucks up under my table saw wing. It's much easier to rotate the stand than it is to pull it off the shelf and pick it up to put on top of something. Unless the sander weighs about 250-300lbs, I don't see it being too much trouble.

  9. #9
    I have the DW735 and love it. It gives a great finish. It's heavy though, about 90lbs. Check Craigslist, offer up, and Facebook marketplace. I found a like new one for $375 on Facebook this year and bought an older one last year off CL for $300 that had the stand. I put the stand on the new one and flipped the older one for $300 without the stand. They hold their value as well.

  10. #10
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    Apr 2013
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    Stone Mountain, GA
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    I like the DW734. It's a little cheaper than the 735, and in 7 yrs it has not made me wish I'd gotten the 735. Only complaint is that the knives get knocked easily, but I assume the 735 has the same knife material.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffrey Martel View Post
    I wouldn't necessarily put too much thought into it. I have a flip top station for my Dewalt 735 with nothing else on the other side. When not in use it tucks up under my table saw wing. It's much easier to rotate the stand than it is to pull it off the shelf and pick it up to put on top of something. Unless the sander weighs about 250-300lbs, I don't see it being too much trouble.
    I'm just suggesting that if the two tools are reasonably close to each other in weight, the flipping process will likely be easier.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  12. #12
    When I first started this journey in the early 90s I got a craftsman 4 belt and disc (6?) I thought to would be very useful hardly used it. Gave it away and went a long time before I got the rigid oss. Much more useful. Us3vit all the time even though the belt is the same size. Any disc small than 12 is not very good. The useful dia is limited because the speed is basically 0 at the center. I eo7ld skip the belt disc and get the rigid oss
    gary

  13. #13
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    Gary, that's a good point. The Ridgid OSS (and a few other similar units) have both belt and spindle that I do agree that they are very complimentary and useful to almost any woodworker. I'd probably want a big combo for serious and constant shaping of wood, but for most situations the OSS with both spindle and belt is a kewel tool. If I were buying today, that would likely be my choice. As it stands, I have a Delta BOSS for spindles and a heavy Grizzly 6x48+12 combo. The latter is rarely used, although it's a good tool.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

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