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Thread: Thread Chasing?

  1. #1

    Thread Chasing?

    I'm planning to try my hand at thread chasing. Any suggestions on tooling, most common tpi, etc?

  2. #2
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    Sam Angelo just put out a youtube video on this the other day. He is reviewing the Carter & sons thread chaser. Here's the link.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jODY8wDLxLc
    This tool looks promising but a bit pricey. On the other hand, it's two tools in one, so you don't have to buy two separate tools. That may cancel out the price.
    SWE

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Mathews View Post
    I'm planning to try my hand at thread chasing. Any suggestions on tooling, most common tpi, etc?
    I like Mark StLeger's chasers. http://www.markstleger.com/tools_for_sale1.htm And he's a nice guy too.
    I have both the 16tpi and 20tpi. It is often recommended to get the 16tpi first since it may be a little easier to use with various types of wood. It's a good thread for lidded boxes.

    For best results a hard, fine-grained wood is best. Practice on PVC.

    In addition to the external and internal cutters a relief tool is useful but you can grind one from an old skew or scraper. Look at some sets to see what it looks like. You might be able to see it in use on videos but I rarely watch videos. This tool is for cutting away a little at the far end of the inside thread area so the internal chaser can exit the threads cleanly. Also handy is a hook to apply force toward you on internal chaser. Some people use the relief tool as the hook.

    JKJ

  4. #4
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    I have the chefware kits threading jig. It works great. As long as the walls are straight it's nearly foolproof.

  5. #5
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    There's a terrific video by Alan Batty on youtube on thread chasing.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-0iEd0kD0S4

  6. #6
    Two more Alan Batty videos

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAX...fT55RHHVzFMx1w

    video 1 thread chasing
    Last edited by Brian Deakin; 03-25-2020 at 9:19 AM.

  7. #7
    I started making threads in wood with an old tap. I put a long handle on it and used it for both inside and outside. If the wood is good as JJ says it makes the process much more rewarding.
    Pete


    * It's better to be a lion for a day than a sheep for life - Sister Elizabeth Kenny *
    I think this equates nicely to wood turning as well . . . . .

  8. #8
    Being a machine junkie the Chefware jig is tempting, especially the updated version (not so much the current version) shown in one of Mike Pence's videos. However the skill challenge in using the more traditional thread chasing tools is more to my current liking. I plan to corral all of those tool maker options and forge ahead with one of them. So far the makers seem to be limited to only Sorby and Mark StLeger as John mentioned above. Any others?

    With some of those mentioned above I'm beginning to discover a good assortment of thread chasing videos online; Alan Batty (makes everything he does on the lathe look so effortless and simple), Mike Pence and San Angelo to name a few.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Mathews View Post
    Being a machine junkie the Chefware jig is tempting...
    A true tool junkie would get the Baxter threading jig from Best wood tools! And while at it, any self-respecting tool junkie would order the Vermec sphere jig. I can recommend both from experience.

    I haven't looked at the Chefware threading jig lately but when I did it appeared that the alignment might be tricky. Is or was that the case? (I've never used one.)

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by John K Jordan View Post
    A true tool junkie would get the Baxter threading jig from Best wood tools! And while at it, any self-respecting tool junkie would order the Vermec sphere jig. I can recommend both from experience.

    I haven't looked at the Chefware threading jig lately but when I did it appeared that the alignment might be tricky. Is or was that the case? (I've never used one.)
    I have the chefwarekit threading and sphere-cutting jig. Sphere's couldn't be easier: really fast and near perfect spheres. The threading isn't too bad. As I said, if you get the walls parrallel to the bed rails and the jig parrallel to the same, it's pretty easy. You can tell pretty quick as you cut the threads. If you take a small bite at first, you can adjust the parrallelism manually to get more even threads. When I can't use a Forstner bit, I use a 12" square and register to the headstock body, and that seems to work for me. I have the 16 and the 10 TPI adapters. I think you can order a couple of other pitches too, like an 8 TPI, which would be good for bigger lids and perhaps custom headstock adapter gadgets one might need. The jig is extremely well made too.

    I've got to believe it's way easier and faster than a thread chaser. For me it's about making threaded boxes where the boxes are the fun part. The threads are just a necessity. So I couldn't care less if I ever learn to use a thread chaser.
    Last edited by tom lucas; 03-25-2020 at 7:21 PM.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by tom lucas View Post
    I've got to believe it's way easier and faster than a thread chaser. For me it's about making threaded boxes where the boxes are the fun part. The threads are just a necessity. So I couldn't care less if I ever learn to use a thread chaser.
    I think the chased threads can be quicker, but only with a lot of practice. The threading jigs require setup but not much practice.

    Have any pictures of the threaded boxes? I also enjoy the turning more than the threading.

    JKJ

  12. #12
    Fourth generation ivory, boxwood and ebony turner, Englishman Bill Jones was the last of a long tradition. This is the only video showing Bill using his home-made specialist tools plus thread chasing.

    https://www.youtube.com/results?sear...s+ivory+turner

    clip 6 shows use of point tool

  13. #13
    John, not a box but a hollow form with threaded finial? I used corian and hand chased the threads. I made the mistake of not leaving a shoulder on the insert piece and had to fiddle with it to get the finial to sit square on the piece.

    IMG_0313.jpegIMG_0314.jpegIMG_0330.jpeg
    Pete


    * It's better to be a lion for a day than a sheep for life - Sister Elizabeth Kenny *
    I think this equates nicely to wood turning as well . . . . .

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by John K Jordan View Post
    A true tool junkie would get the Baxter threading jig from Best wood tools! And while at it, any self-respecting tool junkie would order the Vermec sphere jig. I can recommend both from experience.....

    John - You're speaking my language. However, since we're moving into the warmer shop time of the year and my gradual shift to working more with metals than wood I may attempt to make one of the jigs. It should be a nice machining project for my metal lathe, mill and surface grinder.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Mathews View Post
    ... since we're moving into the warmer shop time of the year and my gradual shift to working more with metals than wood I may attempt to make one of the jigs. ...
    Is your shop time limited when it's cold? A true tool junkie would equip his shop with year-around climate control to keep his tools healthy and increase his time in their presence.

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