Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 21 of 21

Thread: Thread Chasing?

  1. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by John K Jordan View Post
    Is your shop time limited when it's cold? A true tool junkie would equip his shop with year-around climate control to keep his tools healthy and increase his time in their presence.
    Good point about climate control to keep tools healthy, something I hadn't considered. But I enjoy working on wood related projects, carving especially in a cold shop with the fireplace going. It's also nice woodturning while wearing protective garb. Also, my shop is somewhat large with a 20+ foot ceiling and not insulated. Proper climate control would be expensive.

  2. #17
    While trying to decide which thread chasing tools to buy I came across a Ray Isles set that used plain carbon steel instead high speed steel. I'm curious why any manufacturer would use softer carbon steel in today's market for a cutting tool.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
    Posts
    9,442

    Carbon steel vs HSS

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Mathews View Post
    While trying to decide which thread chasing tools to buy I came across a Ray Isles set that used plain carbon steel instead high speed steel. I'm curious why any manufacturer would use softer carbon steel in today's market for a cutting tool.
    Thread chasing is a very low speed operation, not done continuously, and tools last a long time before needing sharpening. Some even make them by cutting threads from mild steel bolts. (I've made taps for wood that way.) And sharpening is easy by using a diamond hone on the top face.

    As to why they chose to use carbon steel, besides the above, manufacturing could be easier and cheaper since HSS is takes special effort to harden. But you didn't say whether the carbon steel was mild steel or hardened tool steel. Tool steels are easy to sharpen with minimal equipment - for example you can harden O1 with a propane torch, some a few fire bricks, a can of oil, and a toaster oven that will heat to 400F to anneal.

    JKJ

  4. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by John K Jordan View Post
    Thread chasing is a very low speed operation, not done continuously, and tools last a long time before needing sharpening. Some even make them by cutting threads from mild steel bolts. (I've made taps for wood that way.) And sharpening is easy by using a diamond hone on the top face.

    As to why they chose to use carbon steel, besides the above, manufacturing could be easier and cheaper since HSS is takes special effort to harden. But you didn't say whether the carbon steel was mild steel or hardened tool steel. Tool steels are easy to sharpen with minimal equipment - for example you can harden O1 with a propane torch, some a few fire bricks, a can of oil, and a toaster oven that will heat to 400F to anneal.

    JKJ
    Thanks John! I let that thinking slip through and just assumed that the manufacturer's mention of carbon steel was non-hardenable. I see now that the tool will not be subject to excessive heat while being used at slow speeds on wood or sharpened with a diamond hone. I have to ask now though if there's any advantage to using HSS in this application?

    PS My knowledge of metals, especially as they apply to machining operations is less than the materials used in woodworking. I've only been at it a few years.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    3,969
    You have me confused. In metal work thread chasing refers to running a tap or die over existing threads that are buggered up. Do you mean single point threading on a the lathe with a follow up with a tap or die? Or do you just mean tap and die work on smooth stock or bored holes?
    Bill D

  6. #21
    Bill in wood turning I think the term means that a thread is gradually started and then 'chased' several times to get a complete thread on either smooth stock or a bored hole.
    Pete


    * It's better to be a lion for a day than a sheep for life - Sister Elizabeth Kenny *
    I think this equates nicely to wood turning as well . . . . .

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •