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Thread: Entry door hardware

  1. #16
    I refinished my door and replaced all the hardware 3 years ago. Went with a Kwikset lockset from build.com. That's not what I would generally think of first, but honestly it's solid brass and no signs of wear on the finish after 3 years. Nice thing about the big brands (including Schlage and others) is that they sell the exterior and interior pieces separately so you can have different styles/finishes. (Like you I prefer brushed nickel, but I'm not about to replace the bright brass chandelier hanging in the foyer just because I would pick a different finish.)

    Bruce

  2. #17
    I have been involved in a number of exterior door projects but am no specialist and have not chosen most of the hardware, so take my comments with a grain of salt. With any luck Joe Calhoon will chime in here and his advice is based on a wealth of experience.

    For a traditional look, there is a wide range of hardware available and a wide range of cost. Deltana has a decent line of ball bearing hinges at a fair price.The simplest, strongest latching/locking system is a passage set (locking turnbutton or not) plus a separate deadbolt. Omnia is one maker that I have seen quite a bit. More elaborate is a mortise lock with integrated latching/deadbolt. Baldwin is one brand I have used. The internals and finish hardware are often from different manufacturers, just be sure they are compatible. You will need bolts to secure the fixed leaf whether surface mounted or concealed in the meeting edge.

    For all types, especially mortise locks, ordering the correct orientation is critical so it is helpful to have a person at your vendor that can guide you. Be sure to review specs carefully before confirming your order.

    Multi point hardware is a good choice, especially if the fixed leaf is used often. It will ensure that the leaves stay in plane. Hoppe is the brand I am most familiar with. I believe there is less design variety available in the manufacturers' finish hardware, but there may be more options from third parties. Again, careful specing is important. For a contemporary design the concealed hinges made by Tectus can't be beat. They allow for easy 3d adjustment after the door is hung. $$$.

    Proper air sealing is critical. As Richard Coers pointed out you will need an astragal with a seal and quality seals all around the perimeter. I like the silicone rubber flipper seals from Resource Conservation Technology. There is inevitably a small gap at the bottom corners where the sweep and edge seals run by one another. This is usually filled with self-adhesive felt "fuzzies".

    Automatic sweeps are a good idea- I have used Pemco and they work. They do require a sizeable dado in the door bottom (around 7/8" x 1 1/4") so unless you have a huge shaper it is wise to precut the grooves in the stiles and bottom rail prior to assembly and expect to do some fine tuning afterward. If you use multi-point latches the layout of the sweep groove relative to the latch strike groove must be considered.

    I have always used wood sills (white oak is a good choice), but there is a wide variety of metal ones available. Make sure there is a thermal break under the door. Be aware of codes (ADA requirements).

    Be aware also that any glass in or near a door must be tempered or laminated.

    Best of luck with your project.

  3. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Larry Edgerton View Post
    Every time I replace a commercial double with a new door I steal the passive door locking hardware before I chuck it. It is relitively easy to machine a new door to accept the hardware from a modern three point locking system, slightly out of character if you are going for OLD, but can only be seen when the door is open. The hardware is usually in good shape. If I need period specific stuff I go to the website previously posted, they are good to deal with.

    I use roller bearing hinges as well, never a specific brand and have never had issues with hinges. 6'8" door I do 3 4 1/2" hinges, up to 8'0" I use four, and over that I will go to 5 hinges. Like I said, never had good hinges fail, and the increase in hinges is more to keep the door in check than me worrying about hinge failure. Heaviest door was a 3' thick built up door in 7' height, weighed over 300 pounds, was 42" wide and I used 4 hinges. Door is in a popular bar/restaurant and has 28 years of opening and closing on the original hinges, 4 1/2' needle bearing hinges.

    I get my doors seals from environmental engineering. Sometimes I buy new aluminum sills in black if conditions are going to be wet. Yes it is not period correct, but they do not rot and in black are unobtrusive. I have had them made from stone as well when setting a door in a masonry structure.

    Have fun with it. One word of caution. Make sure your glueup surface is flat and HAS NO TWIST.
    Thank you, thank you, thank you. That answers my questions. The house is more modern so a black sill might work. I do have a 4x8 dead flat assembly table.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Edmonton, Canada
    Posts
    2,262
    I got my handle and hinges from Baldwin. Not sure where you are located and what climate the door is exposed too. Ours (in Alberta) can get -30 (or colder) in winter and summers are relatively dry and up to 30 degree celsius. I had to make sure the seals are super good, in particular the door shoe sweep. Slightest of air gap anywhere means built-up of frost from inside during cold days. I've never had that issue. My initial plan was to build it as a double 36" door but after the advice I got here that a double door is harder to seal I decided to go with a single 42" wide one and wider side-lights.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    New York, NY
    Posts
    1,739
    I've been using brushed chrome Omnia hardware from Cape Cod Brass on my interior and exterior doors. Their deadbolt cylinders are by Schlage so just ok quality, certainly not Medeco if that matters.
    https://omniasupply.com

    The more stationary door of a double set should be secured top and bottom with flush bolts mortised into the edge of the unit.
    https://www.thehardwarehut.com/catal...php?p_ref=2411

  6. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Jenness View Post

    Proper air sealing is critical. As Richard Coers pointed out you will need an astragal with a seal and quality seals all around the perimeter. I like the silicone rubber flipper seals from Resource Conservation Technology. There is inevitably a small gap at the bottom corners where the sweep and edge seals run by one another. This is usually filled with self-adhesive felt "fuzzies".

    That site has not only a good selection of products but the simple yet effective descriptions and notes on usage.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
    Posts
    4,589
    I've used Resource Conservation Technology seals for probably as long as they have been in business. I know of some of the silicone flap seals still in use that were installed on my self-hung entry doors in the late 1980's, and as late as last year. They are very pleasant to deal with too.

  8. #23
    +1 on Resource Conservation Technology. i have their products I installed 30 years ago still good as new.

    Their self adhesive glazing seals are also awesome.

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