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Thread: Shelf Pin Jig

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    Richmond, VA
    Posts
    49
    The Kreg jig is very useful and not expensive. I had to replace the bit, though, because the Kreg bit caused a lot of tear out. I bought a Lee Valley bit that works perfectly.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Newtown, ct
    Posts
    9
    The Kreg works for me and it has the advantage of three different spacing widths from the edge.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    19,950
    Since you stated wanting to use a router I think the Kreg is out. The Woodhaven accepts a 3/8" template collar and this is the method I use on a modified Rocker version. It is important to remember that using a router is usually done prior to assembly. Being able to add holes after assembly to counteract and irregularities is what I think makes drill motor versions more popular. They are not wrong but, I prefer the lunge router for clean perpendicular holes.
    Who knows what stands in front of,
    our lives; I fashion my future on films in space.

  4. #19
    I don't use self pins often enough to justify the price and space for a dedicated jig. When I want adjustable shelves, I will first mark the two support pieces with the distance from the front and rear of the cabinet with my combination square all along the path of the holes. Then I lay out the spacing on one of these lines. Then I clamp the two support pieces together so the graduated line is close to the center of the clamp up. Then I transfer the spacing to the remaining three lines with my carpenter square, which has bee checked for perpendicularity. Once all the holes are marked, I carefully drill all the holes using my drill press with a properly sized brad point bit. The shelves don't rock when the pins or angle clips are installed.
    Lee Schierer
    USNA- '71
    Captain USN(Ret)

    My advice, comments and suggestions are free, but it costs money to run the site. If you found something of value here please give a little something back by becoming a contributor! Please Contribute

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    New Boston, Michigan
    Posts
    104
    I use the Rockler jig and drill system as well.
    Ask a woodworker to "make your bed" and he/she makes a bed.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
    Posts
    4,592
    Mine is probably the simplest, cheapest, and most crude ever. It's also at least 35 years old.

    I have a few strips of BB plywood, that have small holes drilled with a drill press, after being stepped off with dividers. Those holes are a tight, slide fit to a TIG welding Tungsten that has a precisely centered sharp point on it, and a little wooden handle. The plywood strips are clamped to the cabinet part, and each hole marked by hand with the Tungsten.

    After marking, it goes to the drill press that has roller stands set so it can easily be moved side to side, and the holes drilled with a good brad point bit in the drill press, using the tiny marking holes to judge where to start the bit.

    It sounds crude, but it's worked for my one, or two cabinet jobs a year for decades. There has never been a rocking shelf produced, but I do have good eyesight.

    edited to add: I said 35 years old, but I just remembered what house I started using them on, and that was built in 1978. Before that, I used the metal tracks.

    And before I went high tech with the TIG Tungsten, I used a sharpened 6 penny finish nail for several decades.
    Last edited by Tom M King; 03-23-2020 at 4:56 PM.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    NW Indiana
    Posts
    2,441
    I built the WWA Shelf Pin Jig and used it a number of times. It is cheap, accurate and quick using it with a plunge router.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Suffolk, Va.
    Posts
    177
    I have the Kreg jig and it works great. Router jig is interesting though.
    Michael Dilday
    Suffolk, Va.

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Rochester, Minn
    Posts
    123
    I used a Rocker jig, with drill bit, and did the shelf pins near to the end. Take care if you do this! On one hole the bit grabbed and went through; on the secretary face that would be most visible and well lit of course. I got to learn how to make a Dutchman. It took a day, and in the end is almost invisible. But that wasn't the way I wanted to learn.
    Terry T

  10. #25
    Frank,

    What jig were you using??

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Coastal Southern Maine
    Posts
    259
    An old Rockler

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Kortge View Post
    Frank,

    What jig were you using??

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Reno, NV
    Posts
    243
    This is not too difficult to make from scrap plywood. I have more than a few, in different lengths, spacing, etc. The longest one is made from a 6-foot 1/2-inch thick plywood scrap, about 10 inch wide. Size the hole to a brass guide bushing of your choice, lay out the spacing between the shelf pin as you desire, bore the holes using a frostner bit. I find using a larger diameter guide bushing allow chips to be cleared with a vacuum better. Router bits can be changed between 1/4" or 5 mm. Whiteside up-cut spiral bit works very well and leaves clean holes. The essential thing is to always locate the jig on opposite panels by mirroring the position and referencing from the same edge/side/end. Need a plunge router though. The small version of any of the brands works well.

  13. #28
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    678
    Kreg bit, router bushing and a section of pegboard

    IMG_20170318_184810_154.jpg

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    51,550
    Quote Originally Posted by Jared Sankovich View Post
    Kreg bit, router bushing and a section of pegboard

    IMG_20170318_184810_154.jpg
    I assume 5mm holes in the workpiece? Nice solution.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  15. #30
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    678
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    I assume 5mm holes in the workpiece? Nice solution.
    Yes, 5mm holes. Its actually likely still faster than the line borer I have (7 spindle) for really tall cabinets.

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