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Thread: Wood ID help!

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Haubstadt (Evansville), Indiana
    Posts
    1,194
    Sand the end grain and take a 10x picture with your phone. Then compare to JKJ’s photos. I think it is hickory.
    When working I had more money than time. In retirement I have more time than money. Love the time, miss the money.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Morrisonville, NY
    Posts
    173
    I was certain it was hickory until I saw the bark. I see a lot of Apple and most that Iíve seen donít have that color variation between sap and heartwood.
    Someone suggested crabapple which Iíve never turned, most of my apple comes from the local orchard.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
    Posts
    9,442
    Quote Originally Posted by bob pfohler View Post
    I was certain it was hickory until I saw the bark. I see a lot of Apple and most that Iíve seen donít have that color variation between sap and heartwood.
    Someone suggested crabapple which Iíve never turned, most of my apple comes from the local orchard.
    Looking at the pores in the end grain cannot prove it is a type of apple, but if the wood is discovered to be ring porous it will prove without a doubt if it is not.

    If there is anyone reading who doesn't know ring porous from an engagement ring and diffuse porous from a diffuse population this is a good place to start:

    https://www.wood-database.com/wood-a...dwood-anatomy/

    JKJ

  4. #19
    I'm guessing Magnolia at least until better end grain shots get posted.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Elkhart, IN
    Posts
    316
    John, Here's the best I could do. I soaked wood as you recommended and shaved some slivers with a new razor blade. Photos are 10X with my Iphone.

    Karl, I don't think it's crabapple. I have never been given any of that. I did get some apple from an orchard but it was from a section of red and yellow delicious they were removing to make room for a field of lettuse. (They are converting some sections to fields of vegetables for a regional grocery warehouse. in the area)

    JKJ, it doesn't look ring porous to me so it may be apple or some other wood. But it looks close to the photo of the aplle you posted.



    Thanks
    Ricc


    IMG_3556.jpgIMG_3553.jpg

    Quote Originally Posted by John K Jordan View Post
    You don't need a high power loop or magnifier. 10x is more than enough.

    Shaving the wood with a new single edged razor blade can be difficult but is MUCH easier if you first soak the sample in water for a while which will soften it. I often soak the pieces. I have to use a new razor blade on each sample so I buy them in packages of 100 - very cheap. You can also use a medical scalpel or a razor sharp bench chisel or carving chisel.

    I usually cut end grain samples to inspect on the bandsaw, making them about 1/2" thick and maybe 1/2" x 3/4". I usually only slice clean a tiny spot, enough to expose a ring or so. I don't get fanatical about it. Slicing is helpful since sawing and sanding tend to obscure the pores. For some ring porous woods, the very tiny pores in the late wood are distinctive identifiers, for example elm and oak are very easy to ID this way.

    Besides the pores themselves, the presence of tyloses plugging the pores will help narrow down a sample even more.

    If interested in Wood ID, one of the best resources is the book Identifying Wood by R. Bruce Hoadley, available on Amazon. I've used mine so much all the pages are falling out.

    JKJ

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