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Thread: Faceplate stuck on spindle

  1. #1

    Faceplate stuck on spindle

    In the 15 years that I've been turning, I've never had a chuck or faceplate stuck on the spindle. Today, it happened twice. The first time was with a steel faceplate. The area of the faceplate that houses the threads is wide enough so that I could get a pipe wrench on it and break it free. I next used an aluminum faceplate and have been unsuccessful in getting it off. On this one, there isn't enough room to get a pipe wrench on it. I've sprayed Blaster at the faceplate-headstock junction, and at the other end where the spindle shows. After a brief time I tried with pliers that adjusted wide enough; no success. I then tried heating the faceplate; again, no luck. Any suggestions as to what to do next? What should I do to prevent it in the future? Thanks.

  2. #2
    I use something like this.
    Last edited by David Bolson; 03-10-2020 at 4:09 PM.

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  4. #4
    I would try heat or fasten a short board to the faceplate and strike it with a light hammer while the spindle is locked. Aluminum against steel/iron is a near guaranteed freeze. Any imperfection in the ferrous metal cuts or forms into the softer aluminum.

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  5. #5
    Grub screws are loose Roger.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Edward Weingarden View Post
    In the 15 years that I've been turning, I've never had a chuck or faceplate stuck on the spindle. Today, it happened twice. The first time was with a steel faceplate. The area of the faceplate that houses the threads is wide enough so that I could get a pipe wrench on it and break it free. I next used an aluminum faceplate and have been unsuccessful in getting it off. On this one, there isn't enough room to get a pipe wrench on it. I've sprayed Blaster at the faceplate-headstock junction, and at the other end where the spindle shows. After a brief time I tried with pliers that adjusted wide enough; no success. I then tried heating the faceplate; again, no luck. Any suggestions as to what to do next? What should I do to prevent it in the future? Thanks.

    I too would try to add something to the faceplate to strike. I remove chucks this way - striking a Nova chuck wrench with the heel of my hand is almost always enough but on rare occasions I've had to use a small wooden mallet.

    I'm assuming there is a turning of some sort currently fastened to the faceplate with screws from behind. If there is enough room, perhaps a close-quarters (right angle) manual screwdriver could remove two of the screws then a bar could be fastened with longer screws.

    If this happens repeatedly, I might consider modifying the faceplate, either by making flats on the hub that could be turned by a thin wrench (the Nova chuck wrench is not very thick, maybe 5/3"?) https://www.amazon.com/23079-Univers.../dp/B0064JJGMY
    If you have metalworking ability, maybe use the idea such as on one end of that wrench and drill a hole in the hub (or even notch the flange circumference) and construct a tool that would fit into this hole or notch on the back side and allow an impact force on the front side.

    One thing sometimes recommended is to use a plastic washer of some sort between the hub and seating flat on the spindle. Years ago I used one for a short time. While it can help keep the faceplate or chuck from sticking, in some cases it has added a bit of wobble and in other cases it made the faceplate/chuck loosen when not intended.

    If using heat to expand to loosen note that it might take a LOT of heat. This is based on my experience with large threaded fasteners on farm and construction equipment.

    JKJ

  7. #7
    Got it with a board bolted to the faceplate. Thanks John.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lewiston, Idaho
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    Edward,

    I use one of these https://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/p...s&term=washers. It helps prevent my faceplate or my chuck from binding.
    Ken

  9. #9
    Thanks for the feedback John.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Fredericksburg, TX
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    2,478
    I made a strap wrench using 3/4" wide leather strip about 36" long and handle from Harbor Freight strap wrench. The leather now is getting a little slick after about 12 years use so sometimes I have to add a strip of the rubber shelf liner. A good tug or sharp rap then does the deed to remove the piece. Locking the spindle and small impacts better than major force for me.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    New Jersey
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    I use the washer Ken mentioned and they work well. I have heard the complaint they add out of round syndrome but remember it is a wood lathe not a metal lathe. I have not had any problems. All that banging and yanking is doing what to the out of round syndrome??
    John T.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
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    San Diego, Ca
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    I'd suggest going back to differential heating/cooling. I'd suggest applying the heat to the faceplate. You may need to sacrifice whatever wood might still be screwed on to the plate by whatever method that works for you. This should allow you to heat the faceplate to 300-500 degrees F (don't worry - - aluminum gets mushy around 1000 F and is called "hot short". At 600 F, the aluminum will have temporarily lost half of its strength) and then squirt a bunch of "circuit cool" or jamb in some dry ice into the hollow of the spindle (assuming your spindle is hollow). When you heat up the faceplate it will transfer heat to the spindle, causing it is increase in size. That is why you want to cool the spindle because it'll cause it to shrink. One expands and one shrinks. If you take a can of computer keyboard "compressed air" and hold it upside down, you'll be spraying a liquid and it'll take the temperature below 0 degrees F. A can of R134a refrigerant would do something similar. Cramming in pieces of dry ice (minus 109 F) might also work.

    If my math is correct, and you can get 500 degrees difference between the spindle and faceplate it should give you around 0.005" clearance (assuming that you have a 1" spindle). But if in doubt, you can google the thermal coefficient of expansion of aluminum and do your own calcs.

    I would get a little reluctant wacking the faceplate too hard because it could cause problems with the spindle lock. Some are not very stout.

    If that doesn't work, let me know as I have a worst-case dooms-day approach that will destroy your faceplate (but save your spindle).
    Last edited by Brice Rogers; 03-11-2020 at 12:40 AM.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
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    Northern Illinois
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brice Rogers View Post
    If that doesn't work, let me know as I have a worst-case dooms-day approach that will destroy your faceplate (but save your spindle).
    I don't have this problem, but am now curious about the dooms-day approach ......

  14. #14
    Thanks for all the feedback. I got the faceplate off by bolting a board to the faceplate, and giving it a gentle whack.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
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    Ed, glad to hear that it all worked out okay.

    Thomaswilson80, the "dooms day" approach would be to very carefully turn down the aluminum faceplate with a cutter like a parting tool. I jokingly referred to it as a dooms day approach because you would destroy the faceplate and if a person was sloppy or not careful, could gouge the spindle.

    So, you would use the parting tool on the aluminum close to the hub. Eventually the outer ring of aluminum would disconnect and you'd remove it and toss it. Then you'd continue to reduce the diameter. When you would get real close to no aluminum material left, then you'd try to pry or tear off the whisp of remaining aluminum. Perhaps peeling it off or something. Worst case, use a very fine abrasive cutter to slot the remaining aluminum being careful not to cut into the spindle. Aluminum won't spark, so it you see ANY sparks, you would be going to deeply.

    I did something like this on a 2" shower faucet nut that was frozen on. While I could put a wrench on the ring, the rest of the part was buried in the wall. The force was bending the attached copper supply lines. So I used a dremel and ground a slot perpendicular to the ring. I was able to stick a screwdriver into the slot, twist it, and it snapped the ring.

    But, I would try the differential heating/cooling several times before resorting to the "dooms day" approach. Also, using heating/cooling along with the long board and a "wack" should nearly always work.

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