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Thread: Electronic standing desk a terrible idea?

  1. #1

    Electronic standing desk a terrible idea?

    So my though is to buy a electronic standing desk frame with or adding casters.

    Use a kreg adaptive cutting system table top on it for the top.

    Would allow me to use it as a track saw table like normal at whatever height is most comfortable.

    Change the heights and use it as an outfeed table for my table saw and planer.

    Lower it down and store underneath a current bench. Looking at ones with 2 side legs and an upper center support so it could go over the top of tools or what not when its under the bench.

    The ones im looking at are rated at between 200 and 350lbs, its the strength of the lift motors and how solidly it will lock at a height with weight on it that is worrying me.

    Save $150 not buying with the kreg stand which offsets the cost some.

    Anyone have any good points to talk me in to or out of this?
    Last edited by Garrad Miller; 03-08-2020 at 8:33 PM.

  2. #2
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    I'll offer you an alternative that's easy, probably a lot more sturdy than the standing desk things since it's designed for woodworking and flexible in size so you can set things up the way your want: Noden "Craftsman Kit" Adjust-A-Bench. I have the original Adjust-A-Bench and recently added the "Craftsman Kit" version for an auxiliary bench that will also incorporate a downdraft table. I'm a really big believer in adjustable height work surfaces in my shop and all three of them are now that way. It saves my back muscles and also puts my vision and reach in just the right place for whatever I'm doing. I'll be doing a review if the project I mention in the near future once the top is completed, but here's a couple of photos of my new auxiliary bench with a temporary top.

    IMG_6681.jpg

    Alongside the original all-steel version.

    IMG_6682.jpg. IMG_6691.jpg
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  3. #3
    Thanks Jim. That is an interesting option. Stronger for sure like youre saying but lacks the quick easy adjustment and more money especially after buying the casters. Not much info out there on it wish their website was a little better.

  4. #4
    I have a few standing desks (including one with a stupidly heavy base - something like 200lbs for just the base), and they are not even close to sturdy/stable enough to do any sort of woodworking on. They wobble just from resting your arms on them.

    So I'd say it's not a workable idea. But if you've found a base that seems stable enough for you, then maybe it would work. I'd definitely go put your hands on one, if you haven't, already.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Garrad Miller View Post
    Thanks Jim. That is an interesting option. Stronger for sure like youre saying but lacks the quick easy adjustment and more money especially after buying the casters. Not much info out there on it wish their website was a little better.
    I disagree about "quick easy adjustment". it takes seconds...literally. It's likely a lot faster than the electric "standing desk" mechanism. And unless you go to a more expensive hydraulic table, they are not really designed to handle the kinds of activities that are done in woodworking. It's not just about supporting weight, but also about handling lateral movement without racking/moving. Yes, the mobility kit isn't inexpensive, but you can also do like I did for this Craftsman kit and make your own. I did that for about $80 and most of that was the cost of casters...heavy duty casters, not like the furniture grade kind that come on office equipment. Please don't misunderstand me here...I'm just pointing out the differences. "Fit for purpose" is a very important consideration when choosing a work environment.

    I can't say who it is because it's privileged information, but there is a major furniture manufacturer that has hundreds of the original Adjust-a-bench setups in use in their assembly facilities and they are acquiring more. This is a company that primarily sells retail but because of customization with practically every order, each piece has to be handled accordingly prior to shipping. The variety of items requires adjustable height work surfaces to improve the productivity of the workers.
    Last edited by Jim Becker; 03-09-2020 at 9:53 AM.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Friedrichs View Post
    I have a few standing desks (including one with a stupidly heavy base - something like 200lbs for just the base), and they are not even close to sturdy/stable enough to do any sort of woodworking on. They wobble just from resting your arms on them.

    So I'd say it's not a workable idea. But if you've found a base that seems stable enough for you, then maybe it would work. I'd definitely go put your hands on one, if you haven't, already.
    Thanks thats a bad sign if one that heavy is still unstable, i do need to actually feel one.

  7. #7
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    what makes it Electronic?
    Bill D

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    what makes it Electronic?
    Bill D
    The good ones have dual motors that lift the top, digital display to select height by the tenth of an inch and usually a couple presets.

  9. #9
    I don't have any links for you, but there have been several build threads on the net using both scissor-type car jacks and hydraulic cylinders for lift tables. You could also check CraigsList for "die lift carts" - some of them can be up to 4x8 feet and rated to five tons capacity. I have a friend that got one that size and it's used as a worktable for his wife's sewing (she lays out patterns for her custom tailoring business on it); she loves the ability to vary the height as she's working.

  10. #10
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    We had Steel Case adjustable desks at work the last year or so I was there. The Noden will adjust much quicker than the motorized screws used in many adjustable work surfaces. However, it is the weight that would concern me at this point in my life. I'm getting old and showing the signs. I would not want to lift my 200# workbench to adjust the height any more. 100# top lifting one end at a time is no big deal. Consider your effort required when deciding on speed versus automation. ;-)
    "What kind of chump do you take me for?"
    "First class."

  11. #11
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    Glenn, you bring up a good point...the "up/down" cycle. The one end at a time lifting on the Noden system is pretty easy, especially since you only need to go up about an inch at a time if you want to keep it simple. That's doable for many folks even with a heavy benchtop. You generally don't want to go more than two steps or so at a time anyway to keep things loose and easy. If I was going to use a more automated system, I think I'd want a hydraulic setup, either manual with a foot pedal or electric, rather than a pure electric system like in office type gear.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  12. #12
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    Will this serve your needs? This one is their smallest size 46".
    Bill

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