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Thread: Lyle Jamieson Threaded Tool Rest

  1. #1
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    Lyle Jamieson Threaded Tool Rest

    Anyone use the threaded rest for every day turning, not just hollowing? Seems like a nice rest for general purpose work, but not sure about the durability of the edge. Has anyone added drill rod to that kind of rest? I like the ideal of a nut for adjustment. Thought about getting some ACME threaded rod and parts to make my own. But LJ's rest is so reasonably priced, why not just add drill rod to it? Thoughts and suggestions please.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by tom lucas View Post
    .... but not sure about the durability of the edge. ...
    I haven't seen or used his rest, but people have been using tool rests for decades without hardened steel rods. If one from cast iron or mild steel gets dented a few seconds with a file will fix it.

    The adjustment nut is an interesting idea. Some people mount collars on the tool rest post with a thumb screw to lock it to a specific height.

    I see some day in the future an electronic tool rest. Buttons for preset heights, up/down controls to move a millimeter at a time. Tap a tool on the rest and it knows which tool it is and remembers your preference and sets the perfect height for that tool.

    JKJ

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by John K Jordan View Post
    I haven't seen or used his rest, but people have been using tool rests for decades without hardened steel rods. If one from cast iron or mild steel gets dented a few seconds with a file will fix it.

    The adjustment nut is an interesting idea. Some people mount collars on the tool rest post with a thumb screw to lock it to a specific height.

    I see some day in the future an electronic tool rest. Buttons for preset heights, up/down controls to move a millimeter at a time. Tap a tool on the rest and it knows which tool it is and remembers your preference and sets the perfect height for that tool.

    JKJ
    I understand what you are saying, and the automated tool rest is likely coming. I am surprised a threaded rest like LJ's hasn't found more widespread adoption. The ability to turn a nut ever so slight to dial in center sure seems appealing for finishing the bottom of hollow forms and bowls. I first saw that rest watching the Wyoming Woodturners videos. He spoke about how nice it was and seemed to be using it beyond hollow forms. A threaded post would be nice on a box rest, and an inside curved rest too.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by tom lucas View Post
    ... I am surprised a threaded rest like LJ's hasn't found more widespread adoption. The ability to turn a nut ever so slight to dial in center sure seems appealing ....
    My thoughts on this is it's not all that difficult to change the height just a bit (pinch the tool post at the point where it enters the banjo, loosen the clamp, roll the fingers one way or another, tighten the clamp.) Once initially set I change the height a LOT and almost always by a tiny bit - depending on the tool thickness, how I use that tool, and where I want the tool to contact the wood. This is somewhat different than with a hollowing jig.

    One reason the threaded tool post concerns me is the clamping force on some banjos is just a small diameter shaft forced against the side of the post. Would clamping down hard eventually deform the threads or allow the post to slip? Tool post clamps that that distribute the force over a larger area might work better. I can't tell by the pictures on his web site but it looks like the threads may be conventional, in which case the Acme threads seem like a better idea.

    JKJ

  5. #5
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    Durability of the edge? I've been turning since 1985, I have yet to throw away a tool rest because the edge is worn out.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Coers View Post
    Durability of the edge? I've been turning since 1985, I have yet to throw away a tool rest because the edge is worn out.
    Really? Well I'll be! Who knew!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Coers View Post
    Durability of the edge? I've been turning since 1985, I have yet to throw away a tool rest because the edge is worn out.
    Quote Originally Posted by tom lucas View Post
    Really? Well I'll be! Who knew!
    As I mentioned earlier, if a tool rest made from cast iron or mild steel gets dented, a few seconds with a file will fix it. In fact, dressing the tool rest used to be standard maintenance, especially for those who turned big with gusto or poor technique. Some class instructors taught to check and touch up the tool rest first thing. To prevent dents and scrapes in the soft metal another thing I always did was round off the sharp square corners that came on some tools.

    I've also never worn out a rest although I've filed and waxed the edges a time or three. I even had to work on a brand new Jet tool rest that came with a new 1642. It came with a dent and also some significant porosity in the cast iron. I filled the porosity with JB Weld and filed, sanded, and lubed and used that rest for at least 10 years before switching to all Robust rests. It is still fine but now enjoys the company of others in my box of retired tool rests.

    If you do decide to enhance a tool rest you can buy a hardened rod, cut to length, and fasten it to the edge of the rest with standard epoxy or JB Weld. I think the first Robust rests were made that way until a few people had the rods pop off when they dropped the rest on the floor. (I can't imagine dropping a rest!) Now it looks like Robust is tack welding the rod then smoothing the junction with a filler before painting

    JKJ

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by John K Jordan View Post
    As I mentioned earlier, if a tool rest made from cast iron or mild steel gets dented, a few seconds with a file will fix it. In fact, dressing the tool rest used to be standard maintenance, especially for those who turned big with gusto or poor technique. Some class instructors taught to check and touch up the tool rest first thing. To prevent dents and scrapes in the soft metal another thing I always did was round off the sharp square corners that came on some tools.

    I've also never worn out a rest although I've filed and waxed the edges a time or three. I even had to work on a brand new Jet tool rest that came with a new 1642. It came with a dent and also some significant porosity in the cast iron. I filled the porosity with JB Weld and filed, sanded, and lubed and used that rest for at least 10 years before switching to all Robust rests. It is still fine but now enjoys the company of others in my box of retired tool rests.

    If you do decide to enhance a tool rest you can buy a hardened rod, cut to length, and fasten it to the edge of the rest with standard epoxy or JB Weld. I think the first Robust rests were made that way until a few people had the rods pop off when they dropped the rest on the floor. (I can't imagine dropping a rest!) Now it looks like Robust is tack welding the rod then smoothing the junction with a filler before painting

    JKJ
    I was being sarcastic. I think anyone who is talking about adding drill stock to the edge already understands the nuance and utility of "standard" tool rests. I have robust, cast iron, and round steel rests, and I really don't want to invest in anymore that do not have hardened steel edges.

  9. #9
    I consider the hardened drill rod rests to be like variable speed lathes. Yes, you can do without them, but once you try them, you never want to go back... I have seen Lyle's tool rests, and just didn't consider them to be an improvement, though I do use a collar around the post when coring with my McNaughton.

    robo hippy

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