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Thread: Help Me Justify a Nova Drill Press...

  1. #1

    Help Me Justify a Nova Drill Press...

    I find it hard to get excited about a drill press, but the Nova presses are just beyond cool. I would love to get one, but no way can I justify it.

    I have a very solid, Delta Floor Press that I have had for years. It works well and I have to admit gets pretty limited use. I figure I run the motor less than 10hrs a year as I tackle mortises with a router and I don't really have that much call for drilling prefect holes. If you figure each hole take 20 seconds - 10hrs of drilling is 25 holes a month - I doubt I even do that.

    So how in the world do I justify buying a replacement for tool that works well and I barely use???

  2. #2
    You can't. This is a case where if you want it buy it. Don't try to justify it.

    I love my Nova Voyager. I sold my old drill press before moving and got 75% of what I paid for it. When it was time to shop for a new DP my criteria was variable speed. The Voyager excels in that department. So much so that for every bit I use there are variations in speed that take a fraction of a second to set. That was a game changer for me.

  3. You want it, buy it. Simple.

  4. #4
    Maybe if you could figure out why you're so excited to buy it, you might find your justification. Personally when I get super excited about buying something, but don't know the reason, I'll wait a bit. Maybe in a few months I'll still want whatever it is, but at least you won't be making a several grand "impulse" buy. However, I usually find that I can't even remember why I was so excited about something in the first place.

    So maybe setup a reminder or something and come back to it in a few months.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    8,895
    My old conventional drill press had three stepped pulleys and two belts. Changing speeds was a big hassle, so it often didn’t happen. I’d be running little drills sloooowly, and big forstner bits so fast they heated up and lost their tempering. Speed changing with a knob is so much better!!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    51,562
    Quote Originally Posted by nicholas mitchell View Post
    You want it, buy it. Simple.
    Ditto. There's no way that anyone else can provide "you" justification for a purchase... BTW, you need one.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    NW Indiana
    Posts
    2,441
    I love mine for the speed control, 6" stroke and very low run out. I smile every time I use it.

  8. #8
    Easy peasy.
    You want one? You got the money? Will spending the money deprive your family?
    If the answers are `yes`, `yes` and `no`, place your order tomorrow.
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."
    - Sir Edmund Burke

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Toronto Ontario
    Posts
    9,800
    Jeff, if tis is for a hobby I have the ultimate justification.

    You want it, so go buy it.

    If it's for a business it requires a cost/benefit analysis.

    Hopefully this is a hobby purchase.

    Enjoy your new drill press........Rod

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Corcoran, MN
    Posts
    187
    I have seen the videos and I wanted the Nova, too. Here's help I think. Try to fall in love with the Delta again. If the chuck feels gummy and does not turn easily by hand, knock it out along with spindle adapter and flush it with WD-40. Relube with light oil and reset it, squaring it absolutely to the table and eliminating as much wobble as you can by resetting the taper again and again until the measured run out at the tip of the calibration blank is negligible. Then remove those inadequate lock knobs that tension the motor and the belts and replace them with the appropriate hex head bolts (mine were metric). Gentle use of a spare ratchet kept by the drill press will set the motor like never before and your hands will thank you. Drill a few holes with what is now your​ drill press. You won't want or need the Nova for a while.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Cambridge Vermont
    Posts
    630
    My wife hoards shoes and I hoard tools. Each accepts this in each other. I always have the next piece of major equipment I want to add or upgrade. I don't try to justify it. When I have the money I will pull the trigger. I do wait for a sale as most of the hobbyist brands have a 10% off sale throughout the year. I'm not much of a wheeler dealer so I don't try to maximize what I can get for stuff I'm selling. even still the market for used equipment in good shape is pretty good as long as you don't ask retail price.

  12. #12
    Lots of interesting replies. I am not pulling the trigger right now, but I am sure it will make its way home when the time is right

  13. #13
    Good decision. The question I always ask is “What other tools do I need / want that I cannot get now by choosing this purchase?”.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    3,643
    Put a three phase motor and vfd on your existing DP. I do like the 6" stroke on my walker turner 20" DP.
    I see nothing about the nova my 70 year old DP does not have with it's VFD. The lifting rack looks flimsy to me. and I see no bearing to help it rotate with the table.
    If you buy any old Dp with a factory mounted 3 phase motor you will get a decent quality tool and pay less then for a single phase one.
    Bil lD.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
    Posts
    9,168
    Quote Originally Posted by jeff norris 2011 View Post
    I find it hard to get excited about a drill press, but the Nova presses are just beyond cool. I would love to get one, but no way can I justify it.

    I have a very solid, Delta Floor Press that I have had for years. It works well and I have to admit gets pretty limited use. I figure I run the motor less than 10hrs a year as I tackle mortises with a router and I don't really have that much call for drilling prefect holes. If you figure each hole take 20 seconds - 10hrs of drilling is 25 holes a month - I doubt I even do that.

    So how in the world do I justify buying a replacement for tool that works well and I barely use???
    I don't know if this was mentioned, but one thing to consider is how much it might cost to repair if the electronics quit working after the warranty expires.

    JKJ

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