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Thread: Grizzly G1023 Table Saw - Discontinued Blade Arbor

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Collegeville PA (30 min west of Philly)
    Posts
    645
    I’m very surprised... I had a pre-1980 (guessing) 1023 and grizzly customer service bent over backwards to help me repair and replace the entire arbor bracket assembly. They pulled old parts diagrams and spent at least 5 hours helping me. In the end the saw was like new. This was my experience about 2 months ago. In short, they went way above and beyond. Maybe call again?
    - Bob R.
    Collegeville PA (30 minutes west of Philly)

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Manistique, Michigan
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    1,256
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Riefer View Post
    I’m very surprised... I had a pre-1980 (guessing) 1023 and grizzly customer service bent over backwards to help me repair and replace the entire arbor bracket assembly. They pulled old parts diagrams and spent at least 5 hours helping me. In the end the saw was like new. This was my experience about 2 months ago. In short, they went way above and beyond. Maybe call again?
    They are supposed to call me back, so we will see. I asked to talk to his boss or even the top guy at Grizzly, but of course, that went no where. If they don't want to make a part, I am not sure if there is anything I can do. I did ask for a drawing since they aren't making it anymore. Of course, that request was turned down, too.

    I was told the right tilt has not been offered since around 2005. When the spare parts for the right tilt were gone, they were not going to make any more.
    Rich Aldrich

    65 miles SE of Steve Schlumpf.

    "To a pessimist, the glass is half empty; to an optimist, the glass is half full; to an engineer, the glass is twice as big as it needs to be." Unknown author



  3. #18
    If making a new arbor is not feasible, maybe the machine shop can repair the existing one? If the OEM tolerances are bad, allowing the bearing inner race to ruin the arbor, maybe the machine shop can build then turn to proper spec.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Highland MI
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    3,855
    Blog Entries
    11
    I, too have a G1023, 1998 IIRC. Curious as to the mode of failure.
    NOW you tell me...

  5. #20
    You might check to see if you have a neighbor who is a machinist. I had a neighbor who would weld up damaged parts and turn them back down to repair them. He would ask to have the new bearing you planned to use, then machine the shaft to fit the bearing.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Manistique, Michigan
    Posts
    1,256
    I did receive a call back from Grizzly this morning. They have the complete arbor assembly with the casting available in a few weeks but he is checking why they cant supply just the arbor.
    .
    I checked the shaft size on the first arbor. At the bearings and the full length of the shaft. The shaft is 0.6680 - 0.6685”.

    The bearing 6203 is 0.6693” id. Normally for woodworking machines with this diameter, you would have j5 fit. This would be 0.0001 loose to 0.0005 tight. The shaft was originally undersized. This data was in my SKF catalog.

    I am not sure why they decided to go with this loose of a fit. Normally the spinning race is a tight fit and the stationary race is a loose fit. It may be due to assembly. It was less machining because you don't need a step at the area where the bearing is to be located.

    Maybe the belt tension is an issue. Many times machines are designed with more belt than required and it puts too much load on the bearings. Maybe reducing by one belt would help. I found this to be true on many of the fans in the boiler room at work.

    Sorry I am a mechanical engineer and tend to dive deep into problems that come up more than once in a machine’s life.

    Engineers tend to be horrible at spelling too.

  7. #22
    Larry mentioned this too, but I'd seriously consider having it hard-faced and turned to the proper diameter for the bearings.
    ~mike

    scope creep

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Manistique, Michigan
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    1,256
    Quote Originally Posted by mike stenson View Post
    Larry mentioned this too, but I'd seriously consider having it hard-faced and turned to the proper diameter for the bearings.
    I agree. That is why I am looking into the proper shaft size. I will have them make the shaft the bigger proper size where the bearing is supposed to be on the shaft. The other observation about this arrangement is normally the inside bearing is one size bigger so it just slides over the outside bearing seat on the shaft. The sheave (pulley) will have to be able to go over this larger shaft diameter as well.
    Rich Aldrich

    65 miles SE of Steve Schlumpf.

    "To a pessimist, the glass is half empty; to an optimist, the glass is half full; to an engineer, the glass is twice as big as it needs to be." Unknown author



  9. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Cambridge Vermont
    Posts
    643
    If Grizzly doesn't have just the arbor or it will still be slightly undersized look on ebay for one for a right tilt Unisaw. I'm not sure about the cheaper ones but one of the more expensive new ones are made and sold by a machine shop. You can send them your old arbor and any other relevant information and they can make one up specifically for you or confirm that the Unisaw one will work. There should be plenty of reviews and since they do it often they should know exactly how to make the arbor.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Manistique, Michigan
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Zeller View Post
    If Grizzly doesn't have just the arbor or it will still be slightly undersized look on ebay for one for a right tilt Unisaw. I'm not sure about the cheaper ones but one of the more expensive new ones are made and sold by a machine shop. You can send them your old arbor and any other relevant information and they can make one up specifically for you or confirm that the Unisaw one will work. There should be plenty of reviews and since they do it often they should know exactly how to make the arbor.
    The issue I see with the unisaw arbor is the lowest price is $174 that I found so far. I am not even sure if they are new.

    There is a machine shop in Green Bay, WI - 3 hours from here - that does very good work for a good price. I have had them make a lot of parts for me over the years for my present employer and previous employer. Some parts were reverse engineered (I make the drawings) or my design (again from my drawings). The guy I deal with has a lot of good experience and we learn a lot from each other. I think the best thing is to have him make one. He might recommend just building up the bearing area and machining it to tolerance. But, I am unsure of the metallurgy of the shaft. If it is considerably softer than 1045 steel, I will be concerned about the build up area maintaining bond to the softer metal. I will have him check the hardness and go from there.
    Last edited by Rich Aldrich; 02-26-2020 at 9:25 PM.
    Rich Aldrich

    65 miles SE of Steve Schlumpf.

    "To a pessimist, the glass is half empty; to an optimist, the glass is half full; to an engineer, the glass is twice as big as it needs to be." Unknown author



  11. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    San Diego, Ca
    Posts
    1,317
    Just curious, if the arbor is a loose fit by, say only roughly 0.001 +/- a bit, aren't there locktite products designed for this application that will fill the minuscule gap?

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Cambridge Vermont
    Posts
    643
    If you have a good shop then stick with them. These guys came up when I did a quick search. I have no connection to them what so ever. But from their description it sounds like they make their own stuff and choose the right materials.
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/ARBOR-ASSEM....c100667.m2042

  13. #28
    How does one damage two arbors on a table saw?

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Okotoks AB
    Posts
    1,731
    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Schierer View Post
    How does one damage two arbors on a table saw?
    A couple of us have asked that question, but OP won't answer. The only things I can think of are messing up the threads or having a spun bearing.

  15. #30
    Sounds like Grizzly is trying to work with you on a solution for your 20 years old saw. They have always been helpful when I deal with them, so happy to hear this is in action again.

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