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Thread: Featherboards

  1. #31
    I'll have to look at it again. I know it wasn't perfect but it was close. I want to say it was within a 32nd of an inch.

  2. #32
    I know it was even until the last 15" of board length, then it was like an 1/8" narrower.

  3. #33
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Conner View Post
    I know it was even until the last 15" of board length, then it was like an 1/8" narrower.
    Sounds like your fence might have some flex in it as the board is 5 or 6 feet past the fence on the out feed side, there is a lot of leverage that can deflect the fence causing you this issue. I have this on my Jet Contractor saw fence. My solution, I use a clamp on the out feed side of the fence to hold it down to the rail providing more a more rigid fence. Is it ideal, no, but it works for now until I get myself a better fence or upgrade to a sawstop.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Conner View Post
    So can I use the one above and just keep the push stick against the fence when I'm pushing it through?
    Yes you can.
    ďPay no attention to what you cannot control..Ē Epictetus, 100 A.D.
    It costs nothing to be kind to others

  5. #35
    When something isnít working correctly, something isnít correct. If something feels unsafe, it probably is. In your case I would start at the beginning. Check your saw alignment, get yourself some outfeed support, make or buy push sticks/blocks to handle various operations.

    Under no circumstances am I hanging a 2x12x 8í off the back end of a table saw right at the moment my hands are close to the blade, push block or no push block. Your instincts are correct, this is a good way to have an accident.

    There are several factors that can and are contributing to your cutting issue. I donít see any reference to stock prep. Personally, I donít run any solid lumber through my table saw unless itís been joined; flat on one face, square on one side. Even then, I prefer the bandsaw. If youíve got all the guards in place, itís probably okay, but donít expect great cut quality.

  6. #36
    It's set right I checked it. I don't have a jointer yet, but my featherboard will be here today.

  7. #37
    The fence does deflect a little bit. It's a beismeyer too.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Conner View Post
    The fence does deflect a little bit. It's a beismeyer too.
    You should have less of a problem with this when you start working with better material. Construction grade 2x lumber is actually harder to work with than properly dried hardwoods...it moves a lot, is inconsistent in dimensions, may be more prone to binding and/or kickback as a result etc. Yes, it's relatively inexpensive and a nice place to start. You may want to consider sourcing some tulip poplar from a local source as an alternative. It's also relatively lower cost, machines well and is very adaptable to a lot of different purposes and finishes.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Conner View Post
    I know it was even until the last 15" of board length, then it was like an 1/8" narrower.
    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Conner View Post
    The fence does deflect a little bit. It's a beismeyer too.
    It would take quite a bit of force to make a Beisemeyer Commercial fence deviate that much. I would look for a feed path error. Are you getting saw tooth marks on the edge? Are they more pronounced where the result is narrower? On longer stock support at the infeed and outfeed gets more important. The tablesaw blade and fence are fixed in space. The material has to move through the cut without deviation for a true result. There is always a little deviation if only from stress release in the material but, well within tolerance most of the time.

    When feeding long (or any) stock it is normal to use the push block near the fence, who wouldn't . However, even with feather boards this can cause path deviation due to the leverage from heavy material.

    Feed Path Deviation.jpg

    Even roller stands can try to change the feed direction if they are not lined up well. I use waxed solid surface supports or swivel casters to avoid this. It makes setting up your supports much less fussy.
    Last edited by glenn bradley; 02-27-2020 at 9:58 AM.
    Who knows what stands in front of,
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  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Conner View Post
    The fence does deflect a little bit. It's a beismeyer too.
    If you're flexing a Beismeyer fence, then you are pushing WAY too hard on it. See my comments to you on your dust collection thread.

  11. #41
    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Pratt View Post
    If you're flexing a Beismeyer fence, then you are pushing WAY too hard on it. See my comments to you on your dust collection thread.
    That was just me pushing it sideways with my hand to see how rigid it was. Probably took 15 pounds of force to get it to move. I don't think i'm going to get that much lateral force against the fence ripping a board unless it's super warped.

  12. #42
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    You should have less of a problem with this when you start working with better material. Construction grade 2x lumber is actually harder to work with than properly dried hardwoods...it moves a lot, is inconsistent in dimensions, may be more prone to binding and/or kickback as a result etc. Yes, it's relatively inexpensive and a nice place to start. You may want to consider sourcing some tulip poplar from a local source as an alternative. It's also relatively lower cost, machines well and is very adaptable to a lot of different purposes and finishes.

    Yeah I need a jointer that way I can run boards that are true or atleast they will be true long enough for me to run them through the saw, then a few days later they will warp again from our humid weather down here. lol

  13. #43
    Another thought, do you have a splitter or riving knife on your saw? That should help prevent the board from moving away from the fence.

  14. #44
    Are the splitters universal? Like will the one that went on my jet work for the delta?

  15. #45
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
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    The splitters are not "Universal", although it is possible that some different brands of table saws might take the same splitter, particularly if the saw in question is an Asian "Clone" of another make and model of saw.
    David

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