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Thread: Making an outfeed table for table saw

  1. #1

    Making an outfeed table for table saw

    I see a lot of people make table saw outfeed tables and they connect them to the saw. All I see this doing is make it harder to move the saw. Then I got to thinking, why not just make more of a work bench type of thing that's the same height and put it up against the saw. Yeah there will be a 2" gap but I'll make it just a tad lower so it doesn't get hung up on the edge. Opinions?

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    I made mine on wheels, so I can move it if necessary or rotate it 90 degrees to support a longer piece on the outfeed side. I also wanted storage, so I built it with 3 drawers.

    The top is a torsion box and is adjustable in height, so if I move the cabinet and the floor is not level, I can fine adjust the top.

    As it spends most of it's time in the position in the first photo, it is clamped to the table saw rail with knobs.

    Here's a few pictures.








    The feet for the torsion box top sit on the four corner columns.




    The torsion box top being built, the four solid blocks are for the height adjustable feet used to find tune the outfeed table height to the saw.

  3. #3
    Nice! They make combination castor/levelers so you get the best of both worlds.

  4. #4
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    I have had one the way you suggest for years. It has 4" wheels on it, and I can roll it out and unload plywood off the truck right on to it, and take it back inside.
    Rick Potter

    DIY journeyman,
    FWW wannabe.
    AKA Village Idiot.

  5. #5
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    No, the locking castors on the bottom and adjustable leveling feet are mounted in the top and sit on the columns of the cabinet.

    This is what I replicated.

    Last edited by ChrisA Edwards; 02-19-2020 at 10:05 AM.

  6. #6
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    There's about 6 videos


  7. #7
    Join Date
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    SE PA - Central Bucks County
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    Back when I had a cabinet saw, I designed an outfeed solution that had a narrower portion physically attached to the back rail of the saw with the remaining portion of the table hinged so it could be folded down when the tool needed to be moved or I needed the space for something else. There was no impediment to mobility and the surface was always coplanar with the table saw's top surface.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  8. #8
    Can you use plywood in place of that mdf stuff everyone uses? I want to still put that laminated countertop stuff on.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Conner View Post
    Can you use plywood in place of that mdf stuff everyone uses? I want to still put that laminated countertop stuff on.
    You can, but MDF is generally flatter and cheaper.
    ~mike

    scope creep

  10. #10
    I think the main reason for attaching an outfeed table to the saw is to make it folding. Standalone tables are great for the extra features they can provide like underneath storage, etc. but they come at the expense of floor space. Having a shop of over 2000 sq. ft. I still struggle floor space. I just purchased an inline router table for my SawStop ICS and shed a dedicated shaper/router. I don't know how it will work out but I'm hoping the extra surface area at the saw and added features of the router setup will be a step in the right direction. If not I'll remove the router table and convert it to a standalone setup. I also plan to make a folding outfeed table for the same space saving reasons. It won't have the ability to store stuff underneath but will serve as a temporary assembly area when needed. The best folding table design I found so far is the one by April Wilkerson, which folds a distance from the saw top to allow clearance for the rear SawStop dust port.


  11. #11
    I prefer the design by Laney Shaughnessy, the table mounts to the back of the saw similar to April's design but rather than legs to support the back end it uses a sliding dovetail support at 45 degrees back to the saw base. With this design you can move the saw around with the table and it is unaffected by an uneven floor.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4s51gLEsCeY

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisA Edwards View Post
    I made mine on wheels, so I can move it if necessary or rotate it 90 degrees to support a longer piece on the outfeed side. I also wanted storage, so I built it with 3 drawers.

    The top is a torsion box and is adjustable in height, so if I move the cabinet and the floor is not level, I can fine adjust the top.

    As it spends most of it's time in the position in the first photo, it is clamped to the table saw rail with knobs.

    Here's a few pictures.








    The feet for the torsion box top sit on the four corner columns.




    The torsion box top being built, the four solid blocks are for the height adjustable feet used to find tune the outfeed table height to the saw.
    That's friggin awesome! I'm totally going to rip off your design once I get more space. For now though, unfortunately, I don't have the floor space.

    What's the purpose of this "torsion box"?

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Conner View Post
    Can you use plywood in place of that mdf stuff everyone uses? I want to still put that laminated countertop stuff on.
    You can use any material you want to...just consider what you need to do to keep whatever you choose flat over time.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Back when I had a cabinet saw, I designed an outfeed solution that had a narrower portion physically attached to the back rail of the saw with the remaining portion of the table hinged so it could be folded down when the tool needed to be moved or I needed the space for something else. There was no impediment to mobility and the surface was always coplanar with the table saw's top surface.
    That's the approach I intend to take with my outfeed table build. Could you elaborate more on your design? I was thinking of taking advantage of the space under the unhinged narrow portion of the table similar to April Wilkerson's design except for storage, e.g. crosscut sled, etc.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Mathews View Post
    That's the approach I intend to take with my outfeed table build. Could you elaborate more on your design? I was thinking of taking advantage of the space under the unhinged narrow portion of the table similar to April Wilkerson's design except for storage, e.g. crosscut sled, etc.
    Mine's the same as hers, well was, but I used a piano hinge (because I had it). Most of the space was taken up by support pieces and the dust collection. Here's an old pic from when I was in the process of building it, you can see how it worked out. BTW, this was a quick throw together because I needed it.. supposed to last a few weeks before I made a 'good' one. It lasted almost 15 years.

    Last edited by mike stenson; 02-19-2020 at 1:47 PM.
    ~mike

    scope creep

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