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Thread: Double bead

  1. #1
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    Double bead

    This top of chest of drawers from late 18th century seems to have double bead profile along end grain and front curved edge grain. I do not think profile was scraped - does anybody think I could scrape end grain well? The pieces from the 18th century I have recreated have attached moldings tenoned on the sides instead of being cut into end grain. I think this profile was carved. Opinions?double bead.jpg

  2. #2
    Mark, I think some of us are wondering if the question is theoretical or practical. I think it was probably carved first .
    Then smoothed by shaped scraper and "horse tail" plant and or other natural abrasives.

  3. #3
    I think the end grain portion was carved. A scraper would make a mess of the end grain. It is possible that the long grain portion was scraped or it could have been carved as well.

    I use a back bent gouge for this work.

    There are two styles of gouges: some carvers like to have a small bevel in the flute and some like to have a straight flute. If you have gouges with a straight flute, you must use a back bent gouge. If you have a flute with an inside bevel (not talking incannel gouge, just a tiny back bevel), you may have enough clearance to negotiate these curves, but I don't think so.

  4. #4
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    Was the graining applied to that top? Do you have another picture, looking down on the top? Who says it was from the 18th Century-just curious? The picture raises some questions, but may just be the lighting.

  5. #5
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    Thanks for the expertise gentlemen! The piece is at Winterthur They say the date is 1790 to 1800. I also have a recreated version I saw on another forum, where the bead was probably routed. But I would like to stick with hand tools if possible.chest pic.jpgdesk 2.jpg

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Warren Mickley View Post
    I think the end grain portion was carved. A scraper would make a mess of the end grain. It is possible that the long grain portion was scraped or it could have been carved as well.

    I use a back bent gouge for this work.

    There are two styles of gouges: some carvers like to have a small bevel in the flute and some like to have a straight flute. If you have gouges with a straight flute, you must use a back bent gouge. If you have a flute with an inside bevel (not talking incannel gouge, just a tiny back bevel), you may have enough clearance to negotiate these curves, but I don't think so.
    Warren, it just so happens I have a couple of Pfeil back bent gouges ( I used on my tall case clock 2 years ago after visiting the Columbia clock and watch museum ) gouges.jpg

  7. #7
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    I was hoping it was just the picture. Something about the first picture made it look like the top was multiple edge joined boards, but then the figure matched across them. Gorgeous piece, and worthy of copying!

  8. #8
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    Thanks for the expertise Warren, Tom, Mel... things worked out ...the end molding top 1.jpgmolding top 2.jpgscraper.jpggrain was carved, the front long grain was carved and scraped with my shop made scraper.

  9. #9
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    Wonderful!!!

  10. #10
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    Might start looking for a Stanley No. 66, with all the cutters? There was also a "Hand Beader" as well...

  11. #11
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    Just beautiful. Nothing else to say.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ron Bontz View Post
    Just beautiful. Nothing else to say.
    Have to agree, great work.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rainey View Post
    Thanks for the expertise Warren, Tom, Mel... things worked out ...the end molding top 1.jpgmolding top 2.jpgscraper.jpggrain was carved, the front long grain was carved and scraped with my shop made scraper.
    My gosh that's a beautiful piece!
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."
    - Sir Edmund Burke

  14. #14
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    Thatís exceptional, Mark. We all have an appreciation for the craftsmanship...making the curves (all the same I might add), the veneering, and even the cockbeading are all challenging. Really well done. Please share when the finish goes on.

  15. #15
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    Thanks for the positive feedback. I am going to put a finish on soon & will share a picture when complete.

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