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Thread: Least expensive way to get 10' walls

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
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    Wayland, MA
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    1,734
    Anything else I might get to build in my life will get done with offset double 2x4 walls. You all but eliminate thermal bridging, get superior sound transmission reduction, and can get very high R value walls using relatively inexpensive blown in cellulose. Material cost is close to 2x6's, a bit more labor, but you make up the cost because you can achieve very good insulation much cheaper-- no exotic materials or need to wrap the exterior in foam to limit thermal bridging. I think it's really a winning strategy.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
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    634
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    All this talk of block has me wondering. I have never seen block used for structural stuff in my lifetime except they do build commercial building out of block. All foundations are cast in place concrete with rebar and tie downs. There are a few block houses around built in the 40's and fifties. I know of two cast concrete houses, both two stories built in the 1920's. I would have to call them mansions.
    Bill D
    I don't think blocks would survive an earthquake. Not used around here either.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    New Hill, NC
    Posts
    2,320
    David, personally in NC I would install a 2' knee wall made from either brick or concrete block and then use 8' studs on top.

    The reason why is termites.

    The added benefit is that 8' studs are typically less costly per bd. ft than 10' studs, and that is a small offset for the cost of the block.

    If you choose to use concrete block, you can fill the inner cavities with mortar and rebar as you build it and it will be very strong.

  4. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Scott T Smith View Post
    David, personally in NC I would install a 2' knee wall made from either brick or concrete block and then use 8' studs on top.

    The reason why is termites.

    The added benefit is that 8' studs are typically less costly per bd. ft than 10' studs, and that is a small offset for the cost of the block.

    If you choose to use concrete block, you can fill the inner cavities with mortar and rebar as you build it and it will be very strong.
    +1 for block knee wall approach. That is how I built my 24'x36' shop in TN. 2' 8" wall on poured foundation. Concrete for the floor was poured inside the block. Walls are 8' 2x6s. Here is my entire workshop plan in Sketchup http://www.teetomterrific.com/downlo..._1-20-2020.skp It is huge and takes a while to open but every aspect of building it is in 60+ layers so you can un-build it to view framing, trusses, insulation, drywall, etc. You might find it helpful for your planning.

  5. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by roger wiegand View Post
    Anything else I might get to build in my life will get done with offset double 2x4 walls. You all but eliminate thermal bridging, get superior sound transmission reduction, and can get very high R value walls using relatively inexpensive blown in cellulose. Material cost is close to 2x6's, a bit more labor, but you make up the cost because you can achieve very good insulation much cheaper-- no exotic materials or need to wrap the exterior in foam to limit thermal bridging. I think it's really a winning strategy.
    This works very well. Our last house the living room and my shop shared a wall, so I did this. From what I was told, it wasn't too loud in the living room when machinery was running.
    ~mike

    scope creep

  6. #21
    A few years ago there were storms with tornados that hit schools. The schools were not strong enough to protect the kids, so now they are building tornado shelters inside schools, or new schools of stronger material than block. Filling block with concrete makes the wall stronger, but not as strong as reinforced concrete. Anyone ever cut a hole in a block wall? I have, and it is not difficult. Cut along the perimeter, then just take a hammer and break up the center.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Suffolk, Va.
    Posts
    184
    Unless you need the block simplest and probably least expensive would be go 10' studs with horizontal wallboard / ply or osb inside IMO.
    Michael Dilday
    Suffolk, Va.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,150
    David has hit the nail on the head, so if you don't want to be playing whack a mole with the termites keep the wood up a bit. Metal door frames would be best also.

    Whatever you use of the foundation wall, block or poured concrete, just extend it up.

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    3,654
    I always thought block was filled with concrete not mortar? I think concrete is stronger and cheaper then mortar. Certainly seems to be a regional difference in block or cast concrete for foundations.
    Bil lD

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