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Thread: The Hall of the Mountain King Restrat

  1. #16
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    Aug 2015
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    N. Texas
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Becker View Post
    Tom, if you browse the OP's original thread, you'll see that this beautiful structure is in the woods on a fairly heavy slope. If I recall, they only cut/leveled enough to accomodate the foundation and the natural slopes are pretty steep. I don't think even that kind of "spider leg" lift could safely get to where he needs it to go.
    We use these a lot...
    https://www.unitedrentals.com/market...lift-150-4wd#/ Not necessarily from this supplier, but you get the idea.

    They will operate on some nasty terrain, even as steep as Thomas', tho' I suspect with this 'big-lift' the difficulty will be maneuvering thru the trees? ...but maybe?

    Crane and a basket?? Helo? Where there's a will, there's a way.

    Thomas, sorry if this seems too flippant. I have had contractors that are gems, and some are warts. Seems like we share that.
    Molann an obair an saor.

    If Heaven ain't alot like Texas, I don't wanna go. - Hank Jr.

  2. #17
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    Feb 2014
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    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
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    Those are nice, but you can't rent one for 200 bucks a day, and the delivery, and pickup fees will be even more than that.

    I got my 210 dollars worth out of the towable's rental cost, that day. I also fixed this roof, and dropped about a ton of limbs on our point that were too high for the pole saw (as well as putting on the two fascias.

    The same clients that own the old house, also own this 19th Century store, several miles away. So I did four jobs, in four different locations, on the same day with that towable, all under the same one day rental fee. It's a good thing, if you can use it.

    I quit bothering with subcontractors in 1974, after my first year in the building business.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  3. #18

    Chimney end of shop

    Hi Tom and Malcolm,

    Here is a shot of the chimney wall. It is pretty steep.

    chimney.jpg
    The grade drops about 10 ft over 26 ft from the front corner to the back. It is a little less steep below the shop, about 1 in 5 feet.

    We had a huge boom truck come to lift the timber bents at original construction. He probably has some sort of people basket. It would reach from the driveway. The driveway is a semicircle around the shop. I am standing in the driveway taking this shot.

  4. #19
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    Aug 2015
    Location
    N. Texas
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom M King View Post
    Those are nice, but you can't rent one for 200 bucks a day, ...
    Never intended to imply they're cheap; just that they are available.

    Sounds like you got your money's worth :: right tool for the right jobs! Sometimes an expensive 'tool', makes a long job short enough to pay for the tool - 3 or 4 times over.

    Sometimes the way to solve a problem is to avoid it completely; maybe even 'park in the street' and reach over 'everything'. Patrick flew a machine over his house on a crane IIRC. And sometimes folks just don't know the extent of options that are available. (I have been enlightened numerous times on SMC.)
    Molann an obair an saor.

    If Heaven ain't alot like Texas, I don't wanna go. - Hank Jr.

  5. #20

    Potential Sources of Chimney Leak

    The leak must be either from the cap or the interface between the roof and the chimney.

    Here is the cap. Apparently this is conventional. The flue pipe is supposed to be caulked to the cap beneath the flared fitting. The flare just acts as an umbrella to allow water to be carried away from the junction. The creases make a slight pyramid to keep water falling over the edge and away from the pipe/cap joint.

    chimneycap.jpg

    Here is the cricket that is supposed to cause water to shed either toward the roof or over the edge. They sprayed this with some sort of roof patch today. I don't think that would be a permanent fix.

    Cricket.jpg

  6. #21
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    Aug 2015
    Location
    N. Texas
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Wilson View Post
    Hi Tom and Malcolm,

    Here is a shot of the chimney wall. It is pretty steep.

    chimney.jpg
    The grade drops about 10 ft over 26 ft from the front corner to the back. It is a little less steep below the shop, about 1 in 5 feet.

    We had a huge boom truck come to lift the timber bents at original construction. He probably has some sort of people basket. It would reach from the driveway. The driveway is a semicircle around the shop. I am standing in the driveway taking this shot.
    A good mason would probably just erect suitable scaffolding and have at it..?

    ++ Around here a good mason is one who actually owns staging (scaffolding); not the one who cuts up all your framing lumber to build rickety site ladders and walkways.
    Last edited by Malcolm McLeod; 02-17-2020 at 7:19 PM.
    Molann an obair an saor.

    If Heaven ain't alot like Texas, I don't wanna go. - Hank Jr.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    N. Texas
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Wilson View Post
    The leak must be either from the cap or the interface between the roof and the chimney.

    Here is the cap. Apparently this is conventional. The flue pipe is supposed to be caulked to the cap beneath the flared fitting. The flare just acts as an umbrella to allow water to be carried away from the junction. The creases make a slight pyramid to keep water falling over the edge and away from the pipe/cap joint.

    chimneycap.jpg

    Here is the cricket that is supposed to cause water to shed either toward the roof or over the edge. They sprayed this with some sort of roof patch today. I don't think that would be a permanent fix.

    Cricket.jpg
    Hard to tell with the spray, but I don't see counter-flashing??

    I had similar problem once (and drew my attention here) ... I'd want the cricket to extend to the edge of the chimney on the left (of photo) and to the drip edge on right. The water will have some tendency to 'pile up on the flats' as it is today. And water is insidious!
    Molann an obair an saor.

    If Heaven ain't alot like Texas, I don't wanna go. - Hank Jr.

  8. #23
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    Aug 2015
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    N. Texas
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    By the way ... an awesome space!
    Molann an obair an saor.

    If Heaven ain't alot like Texas, I don't wanna go. - Hank Jr.

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Lake Gaston, Henrico, NC
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    Here's the only picture I can think of, that I have available right off, for a chimney cricket. The cricket itself has to be flashed. I typically don't even use caulking for any part of it. The counterflashing goes into a slot that slopes to the outside.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Western PA
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    583
    Man, that interior is AWESOME! Did you do the framing yourself? SIPs for the exterior?

    I’ll be looking at those photos numerous times. That is the kind of space I dream of having one day.

  11. #26
    Thanks for the help. I will be talking to the builder tomorrow morning. I don't know how the chimney or the cricket are flashed. The stone is thin layer of fake stone. I can't see the flashing either. I presume it is underneath. Right now we can blame the roofer, the stone mason, or fireplace guy. I am sure each one of them would want the other two to do everything possible before they come in and work on their part. Maddening.

    The builder has scaffolding and so does the stone mason.

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Crozet, VA
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    243
    I was wondering where this thread went ... glad to see you are almost nearing the finish line. The space looks amazing.
    There is a very fine line between “hobby” and “mental illness.” - Dave Barry

  13. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Kane View Post
    Man, that interior is AWESOME! Did you do the framing yourself? SIPs for the exterior?

    I’ll be looking at those photos numerous times. That is the kind of space I dream of having one day.
    I did not do the framing. The walls are conventional 2x6 framing with an inch of spray foam and fiberglass bats. They called it flash and bat. SIP’s are hard for plumbers and electricians. The timberframer said he used to recommend them but doesn’t anymore.

    I am trying to upload some pics of the exterior but my upload is apparently being throttled. We have HughesNet satellite at the lake house. Maybe the pics will get through in the middle of the night.

  14. #29

    The paint colors

    The house color in evening sun. The light makes the color very bright in this picture. Most of the time it appears more deep red and less orange.

    ColorScheme.jpg

    My helper built temporary loading dock and steps for bringing in the machinery.
    LoadingDock1.jpgLoadingDock2.jpg

  15. #30
    I wish my builder had pictures like that of my chimney.

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