Page 7 of 12 FirstFirst ... 34567891011 ... LastLast
Results 91 to 105 of 174

Thread: 1982 Martin T-23

  1. #91
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    N. Texas
    Posts
    1,492
    Several folks with their feet in the Creek can assist with electrical diagrams / schematics / wiring issues. Scan the schematics and post here if/when you need advice.

    Another helpful guide is to have good overall photos of the various components in the electrical enclosure; literally down to the level of reading the wire numbers and the terminal that they are landed on.

    The schematic should show you how it was meant to be wired, but the photos will tell you (or a 'helper') how it IS wired.

    (Sometimes, 80% is learning the symbols used on the drawings.)
    Molann an obair an saor.

    If Heaven ain't alot like Texas, I don't wanna go. - Hank Jr.

  2. #92
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Ouray Colorado
    Posts
    911
    Quote Originally Posted by Patrick Walsh View Post
    So joe,

    If mine is also door mounter and a t23 would that probably make it 24v or electrical also.

    In the case of such and failure could it be replaced with a new off the shelf non Martin unit if end be. Or are our makings paler weights without them?

    Iím gonna look long and hard into the pinned option on the original fence. Iíll probably recruit brined brain and maybe his hands. Itís clear he is way smarter than me.
    Patrick,
    I would not worry about the oil pump if itís working. It pumps very slowly- like just a drop in the window every 3 or 4 seconds. There is also a copper coil in a box next to the pump. No idea what that is for, maybe cooling. My coil was missing and I replaced it with the help of another owner who sent pictures of his. I would just run it for a while before doing anything. Itís pretty simple, the 24 volt comes off the rectifier in the bottom left of the box.

    I would also use the fence for a while just to see how it goes. One quirk of the T23 fence is the left side can be tilted to match the tilt of the shaft. This is great but when you add a thicker aftermarket fence like the Aigner you have to make some modifications to this and it becomes a little more difficult to maintain square consistently. I actually have the original multiplex fences for my machine for a template and holes where they mount. With the original fence plates you will not have the problem of going out of square. The T21 fence is a simpler affair and I like it better. This fence leaks, not terrible but the modern fences have improved a lot in this respect. The best part of this fence is the micro adjust of both left or right plates and the whole fence both plates together. Like I said just use it for a while before doing anything. Iím picky about shaper fences but mine get used a lot.

  3. #93
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
    Posts
    2,408
    Joe,

    I figured I would use the fence as you suggested prior to making any big decision.

    Iím also picky about fences but mostly maintaining square. It always seems regardless if machine you gotta figure out the shims.

    I learnt in a pinned Felder f700 z both sides of this fence moved. I then worked in two different scmi machines. One had a fence with the adjustment in the right that moved the outfeed side. It took me a few minutes to figure that out.

    The gomad adjusts on both sides again but like the Martin is not pinned the lack of a pin is a drawback as if anything moves if you have to say adjust for a big cut you wanna take in multiple passes you have no guarantees you donít loosen things up snd whoops.

    Another consideration for just using the Martin fence is I want yo add the aigner fences. Iím not sure why I just do. Iíve come very accustom today wood plates I can screw to. My concern is as you suggested how to connect to the outfeed fence. Iím not so keen to hack up my Maryin fence or the aigner.

    Are you suggesting you have the original plates that came with the machine?

  4. #94
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Ouray Colorado
    Posts
    911
    It’s not a big deal to mount Aigner fences to the T23. Right side goes right on. Left side only involves drilling a hole for the Kipp lever bolt to go through. The original wood fence on this side was held by screws from the back. I have the Aigner off the T23 now but here is a picture.
    D2EE3BE4-6E88-40E6-A0D0-7F08EDEEC1D6.jpg
    here is a shot of the underside of my old Hofmann fence. The close spacing of the pins allows it to work on the swiveling large shaper ring. My T26 ear morterized fence has wide spaced pins for more stability and accuracy but you loose the swivel function. The fault of the old Hofmann fence is lack of fine adjustment.
    10C16FA8-EA87-4A1F-8326-358B80CD8B52.jpg
    This is my upgraded Hofmann fence, pinned with fine adjustment, movement by hand wheel and mechanical digital readout. Not quite as accurate or repeatable as the T26 fence but not bad.

    9C9FA904-B662-4598-980C-BEB6765B4641.jpg

  5. #95
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
    Posts
    2,408
    Joe,

    Ok you did it..

    That second Hoffman fence is very nice.

    I think I could live with painting it to match the machine aigner fences and Bobs my uncle..

    The question becomes how much $$$$$

  6. #96
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
    Posts
    2,408
    Well the mothership has landed. Ok not quite the mothership. That would be a tenon table t23. But this t23 is orbiting my shop and getting closer to making its final landing.

    Rented a drop deck trailer. The seller of the machine mentioned them to me. I had previously not known of them. And omg all o can say it what a time and effort saver.

    Getting the machine off the truck and in front of my back door took about 1.5 hrs. And honestly it was a very easy 1.5 hrs.

    Tomorrow Iíll get her the rest of the way in.

    Otto Martin preservation society of greater Boston lol..

    All loaded up ready to go.

    86D52234-5293-4FCD-AAC0-80EF284BE84F.jpg

    Back at my house.

    FE5216B9-05CC-4E1E-85A3-B8949633E861.jpg

    I gotta get through that gate. I got lucky this time the gate opening is 1/8 wider than the machine.

    17C67DEA-18DA-409D-853A-6FB107886513.jpg

    I call this dead mans corner. I have lost many machines off the side of the pallet jack around this corner. Not fully lost but pallet jack off the plywood and a real nightmare to make right.

    A6CC42B8-776C-4829-9A69-8B3FF735892F.jpg

    440B9A5A-179E-4A07-AA11-FA720BCD667E.jpeg

    And in front of my door. I just gotta the pig up in that platform. Donít you all worry I got this.

    Whatís sick is I have figured out I actually like this dance. The whole thing is about a days work renting a trailer, getting the machine Into my shop, yard and shop cleaned up and trailer returned. This took 1.5 hrs of moving and 1hr to get the trailer.

    Tomorrow I hope to employ a lift table on the inside of my shop door to get this thing down into my shop vrs my ramp. If all goes well it will take another 1.5 hrs max and Iíll have a system to get machines into or out of my shop in 1/2 day as apposed to full day. And without destroying my body to boot.

    This machine is a beast. When you get to moving machines with pallet jacks vrs form trucks you really get a idea of what you got. Makes those felders seem like tuna cans. Canít wait to run one of these cast iron beasts.

    25A2ED23-2A72-4ABE-AD97-09F488FD9C7F.jpeg

  7. #97
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
    Posts
    2,408
    Another little gem...

    Well I guess taste in vintage machines is fairly subjective.

    This is my uncles saw. He makes exhibits for trade shows. He acquired the saw 25-30 years ago when he lurches a small shop and their business.

    He will retire in the next five years. The saw is mine should I want it. The cast table bellow is perfect they just like the huge table for their work.

    29C05021-C633-40FE-ADE3-92602DDB880A.jpg

    FD1E2206-07EC-454A-BAEF-8656A9F4A843.jpg

    6C76AABD-81A3-4A05-8F9C-45F6B08FABCB.jpg

    0E749212-A374-4FA7-81F0-73EE2EC88454.jpg

    Clearly I’m not getting it it to my basement shop without cutting a hole in my ceiling or floor whatev4r way you wanna think of it.

    The fact is I’ll move in the next five years. But then I’ll probably take the machine even if only for sentimental reason.

  8. #98
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    491
    That's a great looking old saw! I would have to cut a hole in the roof in my shop to even be able to use.

  9. #99
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Princeton, NJ
    Posts
    6,375
    Blog Entries
    7
    Excellent, Patrick! That drop deck trailer is a great idea.
    Bumbling forward into the unknown.

  10. #100
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
    Posts
    2,408
    Yeh you don’t know what you don’t know till you know right.

    This one I’m gonna file in my Rolodex to argue my case for every task there is actually the ‘’RIGHT” tool.

    Just wish I could back it up the stupid platform outside my shop door. You know when my shop is full all I’ll have to lust over is a new house with a bigger ground level shop, I bet when I can’t bring anything new in I’ll concur the motivation to finally move lol..

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Holcombe View Post
    Excellent, Patrick! That drop deck trailer is a great idea.

  11. #101
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Central WI
    Posts
    5,433
    Patrick, watch for JLG used. I picked up a 1014 ( 10K lbs and 14" long ) that was like new, still had the paint on the floor, for $4500. I added about 8 additional tie downs because you need way more than standard. Make sure the battery and hydraulic lines are good. Dave

  12. #102
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Posts
    1,760
    Blog Entries
    2
    That's the predecessor to my old Oliver #16. Mine was built in 1924.

    https://youtu.be/Mqg4zg9wSr4

  13. #103
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Beantown
    Posts
    2,408
    Per usual Darcy thatís a beauty!

    Im starting to get the impression you been at this machine thing a while.

    Thanks for the info..

    So whatís the tag on the side I photographed if not the model number?

    Quote Originally Posted by Darcy Warner View Post
    That's the predecessor to my old Oliver #16. Mine was built in 1924.

    https://youtu.be/Mqg4zg9wSr4

  14. #104
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Posts
    1,760
    Blog Entries
    2
    Probably an inventory tag from a long ago owner.

  15. #105
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Beantown
    Posts
    2,819
    I can't believe your bringing home all these machines and haven't pulled that fence yet! That would have been the first thing to go for me. No way I'm humping heavy machines around like that.... pull the fence and back right to the door. Cant wait to see you try to get that lathe though the yard like that

    JeffD

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •