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Thread: Best place to stand when using a table saw?

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
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    I am surprised to find there is not agreement on the safest position. I thought this was "settled science" and only I was uncertain. Very interesting.

  2. #32
    So the right hand pushes forward and down and the left hand pushes at an angle against the fence? with push sticks of course. Now that I think about it for bigger pieces I stay to the right and slide my hands along the top of the fence when freezing the board through. Then of course wider than that then you're already far enough to the right of the blade

  3. #33
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    Apr 2017
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    This works for me, the vfd slows it down and the foot switch gives me much better control.
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  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Conner View Post
    So the right hand pushes forward and down and the left hand pushes at an angle against the fence? with push sticks of course.
    IME, sometimes when you do this, it introduces a late curve into the cut, as the portion of the workpiece that is against the fence gets smaller.

  5. #35
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    Apr 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stan Calow View Post
    IME, sometimes when you do this, it introduces a late curve into the cut, as the portion of the workpiece that is against the fence gets smaller.
    So long as the error introduced isn't more than, say, half of a tenth (.00005") per furlong, everything should be fine.

  6. #36
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    Jan 2007
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    Depends on what's being cut. Sheet goods on a big set up you want to be able to push the work piece forward and against the fence but still be able to control a large off cut at the end of the pass so it doesn't wander left and leave a frenzl on the work piece. You stand wherever you can best accomplish that, usually between the fence and the blade.

    Ripping typical planks, ditto.

    The only time I got the high hard one was at the end of a long day of making parts for store display shadow boxes and used the fence for the umpteenth time to cut a piece about 24"x 8" into two 12"x 8". Regardless of where you stand, don't rip a 24"x8" at the end of a long, hard day. Got me right in the bread basket. It smarts. But not until 20 minutes later when you're able to breathe again, so there's that.

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