Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 31

Thread: Continental Divide?

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Las Cruces, NM
    Posts
    1,741
    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron Rosenthal View Post
    Are you sure?
    I’m not sure how different truth in advertising laws are in New Mexico vs. Canada, but calling margarine “butter” might be a real no-no almost everywhere.
    In NM, the speech of the common citizen does not obey truth-in-advertising laws. I'm referring to the fact that people use the word "butter" to refer to products that are actually margarine. In the display cases of stores the multitude of margarines sold under the brand names such as Smart Spread, Blue Bonnet etc. greatly outnumbers the few offerings of genuine butter.

    As to the shape of slabs of butter, it would be easy for people who use margarine to enter the conversation and confuse the issue.

  2. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Grier View Post
    I thought tillamook factory in Tillamook, Oregon produced dairy products including butter from the 1800s to present day. I remember touring the factory in the 50s.
    We visited there last fall, interesting factoid "Cheese-making was a minor part of Tillamook County’s dairy industry until 1894, when cheesemakers Harry Ogden and T.S. Townsend induced Canadian immigrant Peter McIntosh to settle in Tillamook County. McIntosh had learned the art of cheese-making in his home province of Ontario."

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
    Posts
    9,140
    OT, but when I think of cheese the picture burned into my mind is of endless rows of stacks of thousands upon thousands of 82lb wheels of Parmigiano Reggiano in a huge warehouse in Italy. THAT's cheese.

    Parmigiano-Reggiano_IMG_3587.jpg Parmigiano-Reggiano-IMG_3564.jpg

    JKJ

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Longview WA
    Posts
    20,882
    Blog Entries
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by John K Jordan View Post
    Yummmmmmm!

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    1,036
    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen Tashiro View Post
    I prefer margarine to real butter.
    For some questions in life there is no wrong answer. This is not one of those questions.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Evanston, IL
    Posts
    1,355
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    A loaf of bread has to weigh one pound ,or more by federal law. Does butter have to be at least one pound as well?
    Bil lD
    Bill
    Hi Bill,

    I did not find a law requiring butter to be at least a pound, but there is a federal law that prohibits retail sale of colored margarine in weights over one pound. 21 U.S.C. Sec 347(b)(2). The butter lobby has traditionally been stronger than the margarine folks, so I doubt there is a minimum butter weight.

    Where did you find a federal law requiring bread to weigh one pound or more? The only thing I could find on bread weights came from the Code of Federal Regulations (21 CFR Sec. 136.3):

    Definitions.
    For purposes of this part, the following definitions apply:
    (a) The word bread when used in the name of the food means the unit weighs one-half pound or more after cooling.
    (b) The words rolls and buns when used in the name of the food mean the unit weighs less than one-half pound after cooling.

    This is just a definition for purposes of interpreting the rest of the regulations, but it obviously anticipates breads with weights below one pound. I found several state laws, perhaps outdated, that required bread to be sold at certain standard weights, but those usually seemed to allow weights under a pound as well. I found a Supreme Court case from about a hundred years ago interpreting one of the state laws on weights, but it does not create any federal minimum weight standard.

    Regards, Jon (who didn't enjoy practicing law, but apparently missed doing legal research!)

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Upland CA
    Posts
    4,522
    My folks ran a small store in Ohio during the 50's. The Margarine, at the time called Oleo, or OleoMargarine, came with a little tube of yellow coloring, which you mixed into it at home.

    I remember my dad telling me that Wisconsin (The Dairy State) had gotten the Feds to pass laws against Oleo that was colored yellow. It was a big deal at the time.

    We ate the Oleo at home, because it was cheap. I still remember it leaving a coating on the roof of my mouth. Not like what we call Margarin now.
    Rick Potter

    DIY journeyman,
    FWW wannabe.
    AKA Village Idiot.

  8. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by John K Jordan View Post
    OT, but when I think of cheese the picture burned into my mind is of endless rows of stacks of thousands upon thousands of 82lb wheels of Parmigiano Reggiano in a huge warehouse in Italy. THAT's cheese.

    Parmigiano-Reggiano-IMG_3564.jpg

    JKJ
    I count 22 cheeses per column, x82lb = 1804lbs of cheese each column, by what, 50 rows? that's over 45 tons of cheese!

    Know what amazes me more than all that cheese? ---- That those wood shelves and whatever they're attached to are holding it all up!
    ========================================
    ELEVEN - rotary cutter tool machines
    FOUR - CO2 lasers
    THREE - fiber lasers
    ONE - vinyl cutter
    CASmate, Corel, Gravostyle


  9. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Okotoks AB
    Posts
    1,716
    Quote Originally Posted by Nicholas Lawrence View Post
    For some questions in life there is no wrong answer. This is not one of those questions.
    Haha! Yep.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Okotoks AB
    Posts
    1,716
    When I was a kid it was illegal to color margerine. Each pound of margerine came with a small packet of coloring that you could mix in, but we never bothered. One day my sister was making sandwiches & grabbed the lard instead of margerine. They look the same, but certainly don't taste the same.

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Modesto, CA, USA
    Posts
    3,630
    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Nuckles View Post
    Hi Bill,

    I did not find a law requiring butter to be at least a pound, but there is a federal law that prohibits retail sale of colored margarine in weights over one pound. 21 U.S.C. Sec 347(b)(2). The butter lobby has traditionally been stronger than the margarine folks, so I doubt there is a minimum butter weight.

    Where did you find a federal law requiring bread to weigh one pound or more? The only thing I could find on bread weights came from the Code of Federal Regulations (21 CFR Sec. 136.3):

    Definitions.
    For purposes of this part, the following definitions apply:
    (a) The word bread when used in the name of the food means the unit weighs one-half pound or more after cooling.
    (b) The words rolls and buns when used in the name of the food mean the unit weighs less than one-half pound after cooling.

    This is just a definition for purposes of interpreting the rest of the regulations, but it obviously anticipates breads with weights below one pound. I found several state laws, perhaps outdated, that required bread to be sold at certain standard weights, but those usually seemed to allow weights under a pound as well. I found a Supreme Court case from about a hundred years ago interpreting one of the state laws on weights, but it does not create any federal minimum weight standard.

    Regards, Jon (who didn't enjoy practicing law, but apparently missed doing legal research!)

    My Mom told this law appeared during the depression in California because baker started to make smaller loaves so people could afford them and thought they were getting a full loaf for the new price.

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    4,169
    The differences between butter and margarine
    The most important difference between the two is that butter is derived from dairy and is rich in saturated fats, whereas margarine is made from plant oils. It used to contain a lot of trans fats, but as mentioned above, manufacturers have now started phasing these out.Jan 8, 2020
    If the Help and advice you received here was of any VALUE to you PLEASE! Become a Contributor
    Rabbit RL_XX_6040-60 watt Laser engraving/cutting machine
    Lasercut 5.3
    CorelDraw X5

    10" Miter Saw with slide
    10" Table Saw
    8" bench mount 5 speed Drill Press
    Dremel, 3x21 Belt Sander


  13. #28
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Griswold Connecticut
    Posts
    6,587
    Quote Originally Posted by Stan Calow View Post
    I have a hard time believing, as the article asserts, that there was no butter manufactured west of the Rockies in the '60s and earlier.
    And rightfully so!
    I grew up in SoCal in the 60's and I promise you there were some big dairy operations in LA County. Getting butter was never a problem. They made it by the rail cars full.
    "The first thing you need to know, will likely be the last thing you learn." (Unknown)

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Evanston, IL
    Posts
    1,355
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Dufour View Post
    My Mom told this law appeared during the depression in California because baker started to make smaller loaves so people could afford them and thought they were getting a full loaf for the new price.
    I saw several references to state laws regarding bread weights. I wouldn’t be at all surprised if California had one. Just not a federal law that I could find.

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    The Hartland of Michigan
    Posts
    7,276
    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen Tashiro View Post
    Nowadays, margarine is called "butter". I prefer margarine to real butter.
    Margarine was developed as a cattle feed supplement. It's 1 molecule away from being a plastic. At least that is what I learned, before the internet.
    The cattle didn't like it, so they feed it to us.
    Remember the Parkay ads?
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N7-vau8DiU0


    In Mi, butter is in sticks, like a large pen blank, 4 in a block. Or an uncut block.
    We stop at a grocery store in Glennie to pick up some Amish butter, when we get up that way.
    Last edited by Myk Rian; 02-14-2020 at 8:52 AM.
    Never, under any circumstances, consume a laxative and sleeping pill, on the same night

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •