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Thread: Continental Divide?

  1. #1
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    Continental Divide?

    Many know the name of a popular mayonnaise, Hellmanns is an eastern name for what is called Best Foods in the west.

    There are a few other brands also using different names in various parts of the U.S. (Dryer's and Edy's ice cream)

    But until today it never occurred that butter is packaged different across the country. According > http://nowiknow.com/i-cant-believe-its-all-butter/ < in the east butter is in long thinner cubes than what is sold in the west, known as 'Western Stubbies.'

    As the site says, "Now I know."

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  2. #2
    I grew up near a large commercial cannery. They would process and can almost any vegetable grown in the mid Atlantic. Starting around the beginning of July and running two shifts a day through October or November. They slapped whatever paper label the customer wanted. What ever supermarket chain or major brand had contracted for their product. Even Green Giant and others. Lots of off brands for little independent stores etc. Same stuff coming off the line, same size cans, just changed labels.

    One regional difference, I have noticed. American cheese here is almost always white. In fact the adjective White is usually associated with American cheese by locals. Seems back in the 1930's, it was a misdemeanor to add coloring to cheese in Pennsylvania. American cheese was and is naturally white in color. Folks still call it "White American" and get a little miffed, if a store only has the yellow American cheese.

  3. #3
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    Here in the west the 'white' pasteurized processed cheese is sold as 'Swiss Cheese' without the holes.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    Here in the west the 'white' pasteurized processed cheese is sold as 'Swiss Cheese' without the holes.

    jtk
    In AZ it's just white american

  5. #5
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    And now you don't know

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    But until today it never occurred that butter is packaged different across the country. ...

    As the site says, "Now I know."
    Actually now you know what that web site author knows, which isn't everything. We buy both the short sticks and the long sticks at the local grocery store in Tennessee.

    It's frightening, but maybe you can't believe everything you read on the internet. [gasp!]
    But who and what can you trust? Oh, I know, every single word a politician or lawyer or reporter or car salesman or blogger or panhandller says.

    JKJ

  6. #6
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    This brings back memories, I grew up in Colorado and the only mayonnaise I would eat was best foods. When I moved back east, it took convincing that Hellmens was the same. I will eat most generic brands of food, I will not eat any other mayo.

  7. #7
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    I have a hard time believing, as the article asserts, that there was no butter manufactured west of the Rockies in the '60s and earlier.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stan Calow View Post
    I have a hard time believing, as the article asserts, that there was no butter manufactured west of the Rockies in the '60s and earlier.
    The article didn't say, "there was no butter manufactured west of the Rockies."

    It said,
    So, almost no butter was made west of the Rockies.

    By the time western dairy production ramped up, there weren’t a lot of Elgin-making butter printers left.
    The article also stated this was in the 1960s. The population of the west coast didn't really take off until the 1960s. Before this if demand was beyond production the butter was likely brought in from dairies in the east.

    The aerospace industry came to the west coast and it started jumping and a growing.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    But until today it never occurred that butter is packaged different across the country.
    Nowadays, margarine is called "butter". I prefer margarine to real butter.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen Tashiro View Post
    Nowadays, margarine is called "butter". I prefer margarine to real butter.
    Are you sure?
    I’m not sure how different truth in advertising laws are in New Mexico vs. Canada, but calling margarine “butter” might be a real no-no almost everywhere.
    As to your preference for your spread, I politely disagree on health matters alone.
    But, everyone in our 2 great countries has their choice.
    That’s what keeps Canada great.
    Young enough to remember doing it;
    Old enough to wish I could do it again.

  11. #11
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    How do you fit that squatty thing in your butter dish?

  12. #12
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    USA Fedederal law does not allow margarine to be called butter. Same reason the fast food places call it a shake not a milk shake. To call it a milk shake it has to have some percentage of real milk in it. Not some drypowder starch added to water. I believe Cheese has to be 51% milk so I notice the latest fast food commercials "burger king?" refers to it as "cheddar" the word "cheese" is never used in the ad. I belive the only proper legal name for the stuff is, processed amercian cheese food product.
    A loaf of bread has to weigh one pound ,or more by federal law. Does butter have to be at least one pound as well?
    Bil lD
    Bill

  13. #13
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    I thought tillamook factory in Tillamook, Oregon produced dairy products including butter from the 1800s to present day. I remember touring the factory in the 50s.

  14. #14
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    Yup, been there too.
    Life's too short to use old sandpaper.

  15. #15
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    The largest dairy in the world is in California 15,000 cows. Founded by the youngest Gallo brother, Joseph. His older brothers took over dads winery after he killed himself and turned it into the largest winery in the world. They cut little brother out of the inheritance claiming the winery had no value when they inherited.
    Can you say wine and cheese? a court order made him change it from Gallo Dairy to Joseph farms so as not to confuse it with Gallo wine company.
    Bill D.
    Last edited by Bill Dufour; 02-13-2020 at 9:33 AM.

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