Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 23 of 23

Thread: Spokeshave chatter

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Clarks Summit PA
    Posts
    648
    Quote Originally Posted by John Keeton View Post
    The terminology used in this thread has been interesting! The OP refers to the Boggs “convex” spokeshave that I assume is the one LN refers to as “curved.” Brian also speaks of convex shaves in referring to his Stanley 63X that Stanley referred to as a round bottom. Charles mentions a convex shave and links to a Kunz (Clifton also makes one with a similar configuration.). Interestingly, LN sells a Boggs “concave” shave in direct contrast to the shape of the Kunz and Clifton shaves.

    Kinda reminds me of the old Shakespeare quote - “What’s in a name?”
    John, yes, I should be calling my spokeshave "round" instead of convex. In a sense the sole is convex, but in a different direction than a "convex" shave, which is the opposite of a concave shave. The "convex" shave does not seem to be as common as the flat, curved or concave.
    '
    '

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    1,551
    Got to thinking about what I really do about chatter. All of the normal things in line, sharp etc. I back off the iron until it stops. Skewing can help. If all fails I go to the card scraper. I consider a spokeshave a medium tool. Draw knife coarse, spokeshave medium, card scraper fine. I canít compete with Brian Boggs who can shave the fuzz off of a ripe peach without cutting the skin.

  3. #18
    "draw knife coarse". You haven't seen Curtiss Buchanan work one . The DK is in fact a way underutilized tool IMHO. Unlike soled tools with a mouth, though, it requires understanding of the grain.

    I concur with Chris C, below: take off the corners, then the hump in the middle up until the final passes.

    Convex spokeshaves are difficult because they require the user to maintain the same angle through the pull. This is much easier in a tight curve, where the radius of the piece and the sole of the ss are close to matching. On shallower curves, the sole can rock and react through the cut. This can contribute to chatter. Good skill to master. I submit that for shallower curves, it's not only easier to use a flat bottomed shave, but in fact better, because it can 'fair' the curve more true than a convex bottom shave.

  4. #19
    I just went back through the posts and there is no mention of using a bevel up (wood stock) shave. A bevel up shave is a finish tool vs. a bevel down hogging tool and is available with both flat and round soles.

    ken

  5. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Prashun Patel View Post
    "draw knife coarse". You haven't seen Curtiss Buchanan work one . The DK is in fact a way underutilized tool IMHO. Unlike soled tools with a mouth, though, it requires understanding of the grain.

    I concur with Chris C, below: take off the corners, then the hump in the middle up until the final passes.

    Convex spokeshaves are difficult because they require the user to maintain the same angle through the pull. This is much easier in a tight curve, where the radius of the piece and the sole of the ss are close to matching. On shallower curves, the sole can rock and react through the cut. This can contribute to chatter. Good skill to master. I submit that for shallower curves, it's not only easier to use a flat bottomed shave, but in fact better, because it can 'fair' the curve more true than a convex bottom shave.
    Prashun,

    I'm not at Buchanan level but when in the groove a draw knife can be an amazing tool and many of the same skills apply to using a shave.

    ken

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    1,551
    Prashun, Leonardo could have painted with a feather duster, he was just a little better with a finer tool.😀

  7. #22
    Not to derail the original conversation, but my point is that a drawknife can be thought of as a carving tool, not only capable but really appropriate for a lot of final shaping work. It requires cooperating grain.

  8. #23
    I’ve been wondering if a used-up triangular file, ground hollow and honed for a scraping edge, would be worth the trouble of preparing for finishing out concave edges. Haven’t done anything about it yet.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •