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Thread: Easing corners on furniture

  1. #16
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    For years my Radi-Plane:

    Radi-Plane.jpg

    (similar to the Rockler plane) was a hit and mis affair. Now it depends on what kind of easing is desired. For a rounded corner a hollow plane of the appropriate size works great.

    For a flat chamfer a block plane or spokeshave is often the first choice. If an equal chamfering is wanted on all corners than over the years a couple of antique chamfer planes have been acquired.

    Any of these can have splintering if working against the grain. If the grain is too wild, then a scraper or sandpaper may be your best choice.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  2. #17
    I agree with others, sandpaper is the safest way but not as crisp an edge as one broken with a cutter. My goto, if it is possible to use a plane, is a shop made small wood stock plane. It can be used with either hand and in both directions. It is stored close to the bench and is only used to break edges so it is ready to go at all times.

    woodStockPlane.jpg

    ken

  3. #18
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    Apr 2013
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    Stone Mountain, GA
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    That tool seems a little goofy to me. Probably takes too big of a bite, and isn't sharp enough.

    If you just want to break a sharp edge without creating a visible chamfer or roundover, just use a sanding block. Or a swipe or two with a normal plane, block or bench. A bevel down plane with a cap iron will help avoid tearout on long grain, but a light depth of cut with any sharp plane should work fine 99% of the time for this task.

    When using a plane (or any cutting tool) you need to be careful on the end grain edges. Planing off the end of an end grain edge often causes spelching, or pulling a big splinter out of the adjacent edge, because the fibers at the end are unsupported. If you ease the long grain edge first then that will mitigate the issue. Or you can come in from both sides with the plane instead of going all the way through. A very sharp blade, thin shaving depth, and a skewed plane also help.

    If you are trying to make visible chamfers as an aesthetic detail then I think the best chamfer planes are the Japanese mentori-kanna. But certainly not necessary for simple easing of edges.

  4. #19
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    Oct 2011
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    Winston-Salem, NC
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    router bit if I want something pretty pronounced otherwise something just to break the edges I use sandpaper in a block or a block plane.

  5. #20
    I don't use a single method.

    Even a 1/8" roundover bit can cause tear out.

    If you literally want to just soften the edge a smidge, sandpaper is fine. I do it with a random orbit sander and 220 or 400 grit. Doing ends by hand can cause cross-grain scratches.
    Sandpaper is tricky on end grain because you have to sand cross grain.

    If you want any kind of visible edge, then whether you use a 1/8" roundover bit, a chamfer bit, or a block plane, there's no getting around having to read your grain. So, just take very very light passes. Usually, any minor tearout is remedied by going in the opposite direction on the next pass.

  6. #21
    I have used a double iron smoothing plane for this work for about 45 years. It is fast and reliable. A lot of these gimmick planes are prone to tear out.

  7. #22
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  8. #23
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    Depending on the amount of easing I'm looking for, I use a LN 102 block plane or a cork backed sanding block, or both. It's not complicated.
    Sharp solves all manner of problems.

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
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    Freiburg, Germany
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    as Warren just stated, a double iron plane is the answer. The block plane is inviting for chamfering and detail work but is not ideal for long grain because of the risk of tear out. I made a block plane sized wooden plane with double iron for this.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
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    Australia
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    The following shows 1 of the traditional boxed chamfer planes that I made a few years ago. Of non laminated construction, the single irons are bedded 60* bd.







  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stewie Simpson View Post
    The following shows 1 of the traditional boxed chamfer planes that I made a few years ago. Of non laminated construction, the single irons are bedded 60* bd.






    Very Nice Stewie! A classy solution.
    Sharp solves all manner of problems.

  12. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by Stewie Simpson View Post
    The following shows 1 of the traditional boxed chamfer planes that I made a few years ago.
    I don't know why you would call this a traditional plane. Is there documentation of this design?

  13. #28
    It's difficult, but doing it freehand with a chisel can really look gorgeous. Just enough subtle nuance to attract the eye without being all that noticeable. It's hard to do well though. I keep trying and I get better and better at it. When I nail it, it looks just gorgeous in a way that is hard to explain.

  14. #29
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    Apr 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by chris carter View Post
    It's difficult, but doing it freehand with a chisel can really look gorgeous. Just enough subtle nuance to attract the eye without being all that noticeable. It's hard to do well though. I keep trying and I get better and better at it. When I nail it, it looks just gorgeous in a way that is hard to explain.
    That sounds interesting as well as difficult. Can you post a pic of the result?

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
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    Lafayette, CA
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    Quote Originally Posted by lowell holmes View Post
    I was waiting for that. Glad to see I'm not the only one who reaches for the spokeshave. Infinitely adjustable, and produces an organic-looking soft edge.

    spokeshave edge.jpg

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