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Thread: Easing corners on furniture

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
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    Easing corners on furniture

    I bought a Woodriver corner easing plane from woodcraft. It is a really nifty small plane that looks like it would be great and when it works it does a great job however... It keeps splitting the wood. It seems like if I go against the angle of the grain it is worse but even if i favor the grain it still cuts the corner off randomly. I have tried taking small bites multiple passes and still have an issue. It is so bad that I cannot get hardly a single corner eased over without at least one or two issues. I have been gluing them down and continuing to try it but now I am about to give up on it. Does anyone use anything like this with success? Any other ideas for easing corners? In the past I have just used sandpaper with pretty good success but was looking for a better solution. Woodpeckers had a nice looking one time tool corner easing plane but I just couldn't justify the $500 price tag for the set.

    https://www.woodcraft.com/products/w...r-easing-plane
    Michael Dilday
    Suffolk, Va.

  2. #2
    You've over complicated things. A hard sanding block with a fine grit paper is the best tool for breaking sharp corners. Not everything calls for a special gadget. I usually just glue 180 or 220 grit paper to any old scrap of wood call it a day. Sometimes, if I need a softer corner, I use an old ROS pad. I never use a sponge or handheld paper because it always leaves scratches on the adjoining surfaces.

  3. #3
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    2nd the sandpaper I use 180 on a preppin weapon and it works great.
    If you don't stand for something, you'll fall for anything.

  4. #4
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    OK you got me - what is a preppin weapon?
    Michael Dilday
    Suffolk, Va.

  5. #5
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    Thanks guys. I am thinking sandpaper too.
    Michael Dilday
    Suffolk, Va.

  6. #6
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    Is a round over bit a possibility? Otherwise, I almost always use a block plane

  7. #7
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    Best sandpaper holder I've found.
    https://www.amazon.com/s?k=preppin+w...l_386067rkrv_e
    If you don't stand for something, you'll fall for anything.

  8. #8
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    Like others have said, sandpaper works well. However, a small hand plane will work also, depending how much working room you have. A few years ago I bought the Lie-Nielsen No. 101 Violin Maker's Plane. It's a tiny plane of the block plane type. It's weight is just right for this work since it's made out of bronze. With its blade set to just trim a little of you can round over a corner ever so slightly with a few passes at slightly different angles. You do, of course, need to watch grain direction. Even a tiny plane with a fine cut will pull up fibers against the grain.

    I looked at the Wood River corner easing plane. Your lack of success with it might just be that it is a cheaply made solution for this work. Some of Wood River's tools are actually very good, but others aren't. I have a Wood River block plane and spokeshave, both great tools, but they were more expensive than their basic planes, but still cheaper than Lie-Nielsen or Veritas. A block plane would work also, but standard size are a little cumbersome for this task.

  9. #9
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    Sandpaper here too. I do sometimes use the rubber profile sanding forms like these:

    94FEF66C-78E2-43F6-99E9-DBFACAEF6DA7.jpg

  10. #10
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    I think a rounder bit would be too aggressive. I only want 1/32 or maybe even less.
    Michael Dilday
    Suffolk, Va.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Carey View Post
    Nice Bill.
    Michael Dilday
    Suffolk, Va.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by michael dilday View Post
    I can't speak for the Woodriver corner plane, It looks like it would be difficult to sharpen and adjust the depth of cut. I frequently use a home made chamfer plane to ease corners on pieces of wood. This little plane does and excellent job. It was made from plans from Wood Magazine a number of years ago. I also use my Veritas apron plane to dod the same thing, though any small block plane would do the same job.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by michael dilday View Post
    I think a rounder bit would be too aggressive. I only want 1/32 or maybe even less.
    I generally plane, drawfile, and/or sand, depending on how hard the wood is and how much I want to break the edge.

  14. #14
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    I have used this one for over 40 years, it works as long as I watch the grain.
    As in anything it may not be for you
    I am happy with it over 90% of the time
    good luck
    Ron

    https://www.rockler.com/carbide-tipped-radius-plane

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Carey View Post

    +1. I just grab one when they were on sale here and there and now have a half a dozen. Your corner easing will depend on material, scale of the piece and so forth. For fine work when I want the eased edge to be finish ready I do use a small plane. It is however, one that can be sharpened so that it does the job reliably. I'm not sure I see how the Woodriver product gets sharpened.

    Kit-Hut-(189).jpg

    For a different take on the 'Slick Plane' , I spent more time trying to make it work than I would have spent doing the easing another way. I felt like the concept was good and it really ought to work. We never saw eye to eye ;-)
    Last edited by glenn bradley; 02-10-2020 at 10:12 AM.
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