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Thread: Makita 2012NB / A quieter planer for townhouse workshop

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
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    Lebanon, TN
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    647
    Quote Originally Posted by william walton View Post
    It seems that so far I'm the only one responding who does have the Makita planer. How loud is it? I don't do sound comparison reviews but I can tell you it's much quieter than the DeWalt I had a few years ago. Highly satisfied. I understand about the neighbor issues.
    William, do us a favor, if you have a smartphone, you can get free Decibel Sound Meter apps, like the one I showed in my video above. Cut a piece of wood with your Makita and just let us know what the peak sound was.

  2. #17
    Whether or not a planer is compatible with your neighbors is something only you can answer. As for getting sound ratings from my Makita? Most of my equipment (on wheels) is inaccessible right now. (Wife's car is in for a while).

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Peoria, IL
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    I also have the Makita. Reviews always touted it as being the quietest, small lunchbox planer. Quietest is relative and it is still a loud lunchbox planer.

    "If I run it at 7-8pm at night, will I still be pissing off the neighbors?" Personally, I would say 'yes'.

  4. #19
    Part of the noise comes from the blade design. Swapping the standard Dewalt straight blades to a Shelix improves the sound noticeably, though it's still loud.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
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    510
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Monson View Post
    Are you able to run a dust collector? I had a DW735 a few years back, I installed a byrd shelix head in it and removed the extremely loud blower, it was very quiet after that. But you have to run a dust collector, and if that is too loud for your situation its a moot point.
    How did you remove the blower? Big job?
    “Pay no attention to what you cannot control..” Epictetus, 100 A.D.
    It costs nothing to be kind to others

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    Sacramento, ca.
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    The Makita 2012nb is a slightly quieter planer, not a lot, a little, and as a bonus Makita guarantees no snipe! I bit on this fantastic puffed up advertising and bought one. In my ears the difference in noise level is small enough to be insignificant. More importantly, and more than 1/2 the time, the planer just would not feed the work no matter how shallow the cut or how you fed the work. Straight ahead, or at an angle, lift the end a little, made no difference.

    Thinking the planer somehow made it thru quality controlI. I exchange it for another Makita, same model, same trouble. When the planer would feed it left very little to heavy snipe. Never knew what would come out. Getting anxious to finish a project I exchanged the 2nd. Makita for a Dewalt Dw735. Louder, yes, but not much, and actually planes wood. H.D. has a no hassle return.
    Bill

    " You are a square peg in a square hole, and we need to twist you to make you fit. " My boss

  7. #22
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    Jul 2003
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    Winterville, NC (eastern NC)
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    Scott's suggestion for a spiral head machine is spot-on. I replaced my straight knife jointer/planer machine with the Silent Power J/P from Hammer. Big difference in the decibel department and the finished surface is really smooth. Like going straight to 150 grit random orbit sander smooth.

  8. #23
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    Nov 2016
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    Itapevi, SP - Brazil
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    Quote Originally Posted by william walton View Post
    It seems that so far I'm the only one responding who does have the Makita planer. How loud is it? I don't do sound comparison reviews but I can tell you it's much quieter than the DeWalt I had a few years ago. Highly satisfied. I understand about the neighbor issues.
    I had same experience as Makita thickness planer user. Additionally DeWalt version has a different sound pitch given much more nuisance for my ears.

    Anyway, even my Makita planer, is my loudest tool...

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    Silicon Valley, CA
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    737
    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron Middleton View Post
    Currently, I have a Grizzly 1019Z bandsaw, Makita circular saw (that I use sparingly), Dewalt miter saw, orbital sander, and that's about it as far as powertools. The bandsaw is pretty quiet, and the neighbors don't seem to mind me using the miter or circular saw in the evening as long as it's not for a very extended amount of time.
    I'd roughly lump the planer in the same bucket as the circular saw and miter saw for neighborhood intrusiveness.
    Up close, the cutting action on a wide board is pretty loud, but IMO the cutting sound is more pleasant than the motor whine of these tools.
    One consideration is that a planer tends to remain on longer, while the saws get used for multiple short cuts.

    If your neighbors are okay with the occasional project times you are making noise now, I'd think the planer to not change much.
    I don't think this would fall into the relatively silent category like the bandsaw or a handplane.
    (in one of the woodworking podcasts, I recall one guy talking about how he likes the hollow-chisel mortiser because it is relatively quiet -- even more so than chopping by hand -- and so he can use it at home)

    Matt

  10. #25
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    Apr 2019
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    Just FYI, I checked my DW735 with my Extech professional sound level meter and at about 3’ away it registers about 92dB just running by itself, no dust collector. When planing wood it jumps up to about 100 dB. Definitely a loud beast!

    I believe the Mikita that the OP listed claims 82 dB in its advertising. If accurate, that would be a big difference.
    “Pay no attention to what you cannot control..” Epictetus, 100 A.D.
    It costs nothing to be kind to others

  11. #26
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    Make some stuff for your neighbors. Maybe help them with a project or two.

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jamie Buxton View Post
    If your garage walls are shared with neighbors' garages, you might get by running noisy tools in the evening. But if your shop walls are your neighbors' living space, you should likely keep your noisy machine work for the weekend days.

    Or even better, get serious about soundproofing your workshop. There's quite a bit of information and materials out there, and it isn't difficult work while your shop is still relatively empty.
    Good soundproofing will be especially effective with the high frequency noise of a planer, miter saw, table saw, etc. It's harder to block out the low frequency sound of an air compressor, or say, a really loud home theater

  13. #28
    Makita rates this planer at 83db according to there site. I own one and overall I would say it is one of the quietest planers I've used in the last fifty years of woodworking. You should PM Rod Sheridan about working in a townhouse shop. He has had one in Toronto for a number of years and uses Hammer equipment including their J/P.
    Regards Randy

  14. #29
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    Apr 2018
    Location
    Cambridge Vermont
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    It was suggested to get a dust collector. I can't help with the planer but what I can say is I picked up a 1hp Harbor Freight dust collector and would recommend it. I got sick and tired of rolling my 3hp cyclone out every time I wanted to make a cut on the band saw so I toyed with getting a small one just for occasional use. In hindsight I would have bought a more expensive one but I thought it was going to be worthless. Until I got it I was using the (noisy) vac. The thing is very quiet, much quieter than my larger collector. The only thing I had to do was remove the plastic guards on the inlet/ outlet of it. The smallest of particles would get caught and collect everything and soon it would stop sucking. Occasionally now I can hear a chip hit the fan blade but that's because I don't use a separator with it. If you can remove the blower from the planer and get a trash can separator for in between the planer and DC I would serious look to go that route. If you don't have one sooner or later you will want a dust collector anyway. Working in a small shop, even with the door open, without one is not that much fun.

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