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Thread: I finally did it, bought a Festool Domino

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    99

    I finally did it, bought a Festool Domino

    Have looked at all the Festool tools for years at places like Woodcraft and Highland in Atlanta. Considered them overpriced like many. But I broke down and drank the green koolaid. I bought the Domino 500 Emerald edition. I am floored by its quality and how beautifully it works.Like my Sawstop 3hp PCS worth the money! Thinking there might be more Systainers in my future!

  2. #2
    Congratulations! I recently purchased a 700 and I like it a lot. Easiest way to make mortises. Doesn't take up much space in the shop. And very portable.

  3. #3
    I resisted for a long time but recently bought both dominoes. Lovely machines. A joy to use.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Cedar Park, TX (NW Austin)
    Posts
    377
    Congrats David. Big tool purchases are always a bit nerve wracking but it sounds like you made the right choice. From my perspective the Domino is a game changer in power tools and I will probably follow your lead. Hopefully I can resist the lure of making all my tools a matching green.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Richardson, Texas
    Posts
    163
    Enjoy your new tool David!

    I fell for a Rotex 90 a couple years ago, a few months later had the 150. As the old saying goes "only regret is not doing it sooner"

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    51,584
    Domino (both versions) are really great tools, IMHO. I was very sad that I waited as long as I did to acquire my 700 after using it the very first time. It does what I ask it to do efficiently and accurately...every time. I think it's probably that "one Festool" worth owning, regardless of brand loyalties for so many other things. Of course, I have a lot of Festool tools just because I really like them and the system and over time they've been no more expensive or maybe less expensive than other choices because they last and last and last. Most of mine were acquired in the mid-2000s.

    The most important thing to remember with Domino (and any alternative type tool such as a biscuit joiner or doweling cutter) is to always index off the same surface on adjacent components.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    99
    Thanks guys. I’ve made a lot of mortise and tenon joints using power and hand tools which I think makes you really appreciate the Domino. I can easily see how one could buy both the 500 and the XL. I glued up several thick long panels and I was astounded how much easier the alignment was with the Domino compared to the biscuit joiner. The project that pushed me to make the purchase is a table for my daughter. Basically 4 slabs 15” wide 2 1/4” thick and 60” long for top and bottom and 30” long for the sides. The 4 panels will be put together as oversized Carcase miters and I will use2 rows of 10mm x50mm tenons to support the long miters. Always nice to have an excuse for a new tool! And it was nice to get the three extra cutters with the Emerald 20th anniversary edition.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Lebanon, TN
    Posts
    654
    Love mine, had it for 6+ years. Finished a project for the wife last week, a rotating top Blocking Table for her knitting projects, using the DF500. The cubby's are sized to use Ikea Storage bins, which she is currently sorting and filling in the next room.




    Tomorrow, I start a set of rolling drawers that will also act as a mobile base for my new lathe. The DF500 will get a good workout.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    So Cal
    Posts
    2,537
    I also am a big fan of the Festool Domino. I’ve had mine long enough to use it on advanced woodworking projects.
    These compound miters are held tightly with the domino.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Aj

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Location
    Averill Park NY
    Posts
    110
    I recently bought the 500. Haven’t done any projects with it yet. Have only played around with it. Also have the rotes 125, love it.
    Some Blue Tools
    Some Yellow Tools
    And a Pet Grizzly
    ShapeokoXL
    Blue and White 50 Watt

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Kansas City
    Posts
    727
    I bought mine used from a fellow creeker and I use it on most every project. I still use traditional M&T, but the domino is great for a lot of situations.

    The XL looks really great. If I ever have occasion to make doors I will most likely get one. But for me, the 500 is sufficient for my needs

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Prairie Village, KS
    Posts
    393
    I bought a Domino 500 last year. Found a good deal on a slightly use done. $850 for the set plus a systainer full of dominos. Told myself that's the only Festool product I'd buy just because of the uniqueness. Well....

    Screen Shot 2020-02-04 at 9.02.11 AM.jpg

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Lebanon, TN
    Posts
    654
    I needed to make four 4" square cabinet legs for my outfeed table out of 3/4" plywood. I chamfered each edge 45 degrees. To help hold and align these, while I glue'd up, I used Dominos.

    I bought this jig with clamp and the plans for the wooden jig and built the jig out of scrap off cuts. This made it so easy to do the edges of the legs and the face frames of the cabinet.

    Warning, they have lots of neat accessories for the Festool products.


  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Location
    Denver
    Posts
    124
    David - Congrats on your purchase. You discovered that there is real value in what you pay for Festool. While pricey for sure, I firmly believe you get what you pay for. I'd love to have a DF 500. I have the 700 and love it but it's a lot to handle. I think the 500 would be great in most applications.

    In addition to Jim's advise above (yes I've made that mistake a time or two), when you join two pieces at 90 degrees, think about the depth of cut in advance.

    I often use a 40 mm domino to join two 19 mm (3/4") pieces. I set the depth to 15 mm for one piece and 25 mm in the other.

    The first time I did this, I split the 40mm into 20mm and plunged away. Obviously I blew through the side of one piece.

    OR...make sure you use the right length domino for your application...


    As you use your DF 500 more, you'll see some great third party accessories from TSO Products, Seneca, etc. I'm a big fan of the TSO Bigfoot. https://tsoproducts.com/accessories/...estool-domino/. This is a really nice addition to the Domino.

    Cheers,
    Mark

  15. #15
    I used my 700 with the 5mm and 6mm cutters of the 500 using the Seneca adapter. But I usually do not use the pre-made tenons. I bought mine used and the seller included some 12mm tenons and I have used a few. But normally I just cut a bit of scrap and make the tenon I need. Even with rounding over the ends on the router table it doesn't take much time - especially compared to traditional mortise and tenon joints. This also allows me to make much wider tenons. I plunge on about 1/2 inch intervals to make the long mortises. I've built a crib and bed with it so far plus a few other things. I am still learning to use it but I have not found it difficult. The mm thing is an unnecessary hassle but I knew that when I bought it. I also have some pre-made up tenon stock that I cut to length as I use it. It is especially time efficient to cut several pieces of scrap up when you have the setup on the saw and router table.

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