Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst 12345
Results 61 to 67 of 67

Thread: CNC - calibration issues for inlay work

  1. #61
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    52,338
    Yes, that's an awesome fit!!
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Hayes, Virginia
    Posts
    13,510
    David,

    Ya got it down to a science my friend, they look perfect.

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Dawson Creek, BC
    Posts
    953
    That's a fit to be proud of. Great tenacity.

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Suwanee, GA
    Posts
    3,686
    How about using a v-bit and cut your inlay upside down? I did that for a guitar builder that needed zero gap and we were able to achieve it quite easily. For small or narrow parts I used a pretty steep bit but for larger parts I used a 45 or 60 degree bit.

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    SE PA - Central Bucks County
    Posts
    52,338
    Gary, v-bit style inlay is a very common technique, especially for smaller projects where the backside of the inlay (male) can be sliced off on the bandsaw and then brought flush with a hand plane or by sanding. One can get a really close fit that way and maintain sharp corners. It does require very careful calculation for depth of cut so that the fit is right while still leaving a tiny bit of room for glue.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    NW Louisiana
    Posts
    676
    Yes sir, I could have switched to V-bit style of inlay but for me this was more about understanding why it wasn't working on the CNC when the CAD work showed it should work, why pockets were coming out small whether I planned to do inlay, put a dowel in a hole for a pivot, boring a hole for a bolt and finding it wouldn't fit even though I specified the hole to be 0.005" over the bolt size, etc. It just should have been right. Now that I have it figured out I can do either style of inlay, depending on the project, and know that I won't have to work with it by making multiple passes of 0.001" and hoping it will fit soon.

    Now on to the next challenge! LOL!

    David
    David
    CurlyWoodShop on Etsy, David Falkner on YouTube, difalkner on Instagram

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona
    Posts
    714
    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Hair View Post
    How about using a v-bit and cut your inlay upside down? I did that for a guitar builder that needed zero gap and we were able to achieve it quite easily. For small or narrow parts I used a pretty steep bit but for larger parts I used a 45 or 60 degree bit.

    That's a great idea!!
    David

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •