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Thread: Burning logs in a pit

  1. #16
    If you cover up that burning wood in the pit with dirt again, depriving it of oxygen, you can make charcoal, and sell it. Put that carbon to use! Mmmmm, barbecue!

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Page View Post
    John, make this your avatar.
    Absolutely

  3. #18
    I suspect having the fire in a pit also directs some of the radiant heat back toward the fire, increasing the temperature of material not already burning.
    Lee Schierer
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    Captain USN(Ret)

    My advice, comments and suggestions are free, but it costs money to run the site. If you found something of value here please give a little something back by becoming a contributor! Please Contribute

  4. #19
    John, you are an extraordinary guy. It is only fitting that your portrait be in the "hyper realistic style".

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Dawson View Post
    If you cover up that burning wood in the pit with dirt again, depriving it of oxygen, you can make charcoal, and sell it. Put that carbon to use! Mmmmm, barbecue!
    Yes, I learned that accidentally years ago with open piles! When we bought this place the trees and brush had grown about 30' into the field in a stretch by the road. I wanted to fence that field for animals so I dug up and pushed things into a number of piles maybe 6' high by 20' long and burned them. At the end of the day I covered what was left with dirt and later discovered the fantastic charcoal that made!

  6. #21
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    I had an Uncle that went in the charcoal making business in the '60's. He said it was harder to make good charcoal than you think. I still have hundreds of the heavy paper bags that never got used with the logo on them.

  7. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom M King View Post
    I had an Uncle that went in the charcoal making business in the '60's. He said it was harder to make good charcoal than you think. I still have hundreds of the heavy paper bags that never got used with the logo on them.
    In Africa they do this all the time. It is the principal source of fuel for cooking in many areas... and they are dirt poor. Every village has a charcoal shaman. If they can do it, so too can we.

    It's also deeply related to historic "steel" production. Why don't we do it like they do it on the Discovery Channel! :^)

  8. #23
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    My Uncle made charcoal, and even sold some, but they could never make any that lasted anything like as long as Kingsford. Evidently, it's not hard to make charcoal, but probably a lot harder to make good charcoal, especially when you've been spoiled to Kingsford.

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Page View Post

    Quote Originally Posted by John K Jordan View Post
    John, make this your avatar.
    Maybe it IS 'bout time to change. That little goat has been long replaced by little llamas.

    But yikes, my Lovely Bride would beat me with a stick if she saw the grimy pic! She'd prob like this one better:

    dress_up2_r.jpg

    Or maybe this one, my reason for living!

    sunday_school_B2.jpg

    But shouldn't it be a picture related to woodturning?

    handbell_demo_IMG_0411.jpg

    Personally, I think one of these is the "real" me.

    shaving_IMG_0173.jpg

    JKJ_PC160001.jpg

    Ari_JKJ_B_20190716_153658.jpg

    Oh, what to do, what to do...

    JKJ

  10. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom M King View Post
    My Uncle made charcoal, and even sold some, but they could never make any that lasted anything like as long as Kingsford. Evidently, it's not hard to make charcoal, but probably a lot harder to make good charcoal, especially when you've been spoiled to Kingsford.
    Kingsford used to be "okay", many years ago, but the stuff they sell today doesn't burn near as good or long or hot, certainly not nearly as well as common brands of real lump charcoal like Royal Oak (resold at a higher price as BGE) or Jealous Devil, if it ever did.

  11. #26
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    I haven't used charcoal for probably 15 years. Sounds like I have some catching up to do.

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom M King View Post
    My Uncle made charcoal, and even sold some, but they could never make any that lasted anything like as long as Kingsford. Evidently, it's not hard to make charcoal, but probably a lot harder to make good charcoal, especially when you've been spoiled to Kingsford.
    Your Uncle not only didn't have the resources of the makers of Kingsford, he likely didn't add the coal dust and binders:

    Kingsford Charcoal is made from charred softwoods such as pine and spruce which is then mixed with ground coal and other ingredients to make a charcoal briquette. As of January 2016, Kingsford Charcoal contains the following ingredients: Wood char - Fuel for heating. Mineral char - Fuel for heating, Mineral carbon - Fuel for heating, Limestone - Binding agent, Starch - Binding agent, Borax - Release agent and Sawdust - Speed up ignition.
    More here > https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kingsford_(charcoal) <

    It started out as a way for the Ford Motor company to use up wood waste from manufacturing wooden components used in automobiles.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

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