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Thread: Anyone know what type of wood this is?

  1. #1

    Anyone know what type of wood this is?

    https://imgur.com/a/wALPKS4

    This wood was used to build the pallet & packaging for a planer/jointer I purchased from Grizzly. It's pretty dense and quite heavy. All but one piece have a very obvious red tone. Nails don't go all the way through, so I'm thinking of using them in a project, but I would need to procure some more.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Elmodel, Ga.
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    474
    Can't help identifying your wood, but a word of caution about pallet wood that comes from overseas. It may contain chemicals that are not very friendly. Seeing that it came from Grizzly, I would think it would be ok , but I would still be leery, Of course it would also depend on the project you are planning.
    Had a friend, not to bright, I might add, that used some pallet wood to make projects to sell. It had chemicals on it, in it, etc. It was saturated. There was no mistaking what it contained, but she used it anyway, oblivious to the danger.
    Your wood may be fine, but be careful.
    BTW, that is some nice looking wood no the less.
    SWE

  3. #3
    Wood in a pallet used for international shipping needs to be treated to prevent insects from being transported. It should have a stamp on it indicating what method was used. If the stamp includes the letters HT that means it has been heat treated rather than chemically treated so it "should" be ok. Don't think the fact it came from Grizzly would mean anything.

  4. #4
    Wow, learn something new every day. Completely disassembled the pallets months ago, but looks like I'm in the clear as far as chemicals go. A couple pieces did have stamps. Looks like they originated from Taiwan and are heat treated (https://www.1001pallets.com/pallet-safety/).

    Is my best bet to get a match to take one to a hardwood lumber yard and trying to find something similar? I'm going to make an AV rack cabinet.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Cedar Park, TX (NW Austin)
    Posts
    350
    Just buy more big tools from Grizzly and hope you get the same kind of pallet. Think of the purchase as a deal, “Buy a wide belt sander and get free project wood.”

  6. #6
    If your near a Grizzly store you could stop in and see if they have any pallets they are throwing out.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    61
    Have you contacted Grizzly and ask them?

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by John Goodin View Post
    Just buy more big tools from Grizzly and hope you get the same kind of pallet. Think of the purchase as a deal, “Buy a wide belt sander and get free project wood.”
    Lol... tried that twice. So far no luck . I'll shoot an email to their customer support.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
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    8,909
    Quote Originally Posted by Josh Davidson View Post
    https://imgur.com/a/wALPKS4

    This wood was used to build the pallet & packaging for a planer/jointer I purchased from Grizzly. It's pretty dense and quite heavy. All but one piece have a very obvious red tone. Nails don't go all the way through, so I'm thinking of using them in a project, but I would need to procure some more.
    I've picked up free pallet wood from granite and marble companies. One cuts disassembles and puts the pieces in a big bin for people to scrounge through. You can find many interesting "exotic" species. Most are heat treated.

    Good luck on guessing the species. There are many thousands of species and pallet makers use what is available locally. Chances of it being a recognizable wood to someone in the US are slim. If you need a name, make one up. Or try to analyze it based on the book Identifying Wood by Hoadley or the Wood ID page on the Wood Database web site. The US gov Forestry Products lab will also ID for free. Maybe they can handle obscure exotics.

    JKJ

  10. #10
    I reached out to Grizzly, but they weren't able to identify it and just saiid it was likely wood local to Taiwan. I think I'm going to try and just use it as a top and mix it with some walnut for the project I had in mind.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Michiana
    Posts
    1,518
    I have a couple pieces that look similar and appear to be heat treated. They came from an offshore shipping crate. They are a bear to work, behaving much like heat treated steel. The stuff is HARD.
    Sharp solves all manner of problems.

  12. #12
    I have no idea what it is but it looks like hickory including hickory's tendency to blue stain if it's not stickeredreclaimed-hickory-wood-flooring2-e1565450237400.jpg properly

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by John K Jordan View Post
    I've picked up free pallet wood from granite and marble companies. One cuts disassembles and puts the pieces in a big bin for people to scrounge through. You can find many interesting "exotic" species. Most are heat treated.

    Good luck on guessing the species. There are many thousands of species and pallet makers use what is available locally. Chances of it being a recognizable wood to someone in the US are slim. If you need a name, make one up. Or try to analyze it based on the book Identifying Wood by Hoadley or the Wood ID page on the Wood Database web site. The US gov Forestry Products lab will also ID for free. Maybe they can handle obscure exotics.

    JKJ
    Wow you learn something new every day

    https://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/research/c...dfactsheet.php

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    E TN, near Knoxville
    Posts
    8,909
    Quote Originally Posted by kent wardecke View Post
    Wow you learn something new every day

    https://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/research/c...dfactsheet.php
    Looks like they've changed things up a little in the last few years. They used to allow 5 samples per year per US citizen, now 3 samples per household. Can't blame 'em.

    I've only used them once as a test when someone on another forum wanted an ID. She sent me a piece in the mail and a piece to the gov lab. Fortunately, we both came back with the same answer! Her sample was easy - elm.

    I got started with the wood ID hobby when I got a taste from the book Understanding Wood by R. Bruce Hoadley, then bought his companion book Identifying Wood which was far more complete. The Wood Database article is good and their pictures of endgrain closeups are a good reference, as is the web site hobbithouseinc.com
    I have a few other books that help but they are not the best. The best thing is to get leaves, not likely in the case of pallet wood!

    JKJ

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