Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 23

Thread: Knowingly Buying Cheap Tools

  1. #1

    Knowingly Buying Cheap Tools

    How many times have you bought tools knowing that they are cheap quality but sufficient to get the job done and of occasional use? I recently bought a half-round rasp and I only wanted it to hog out a hole but didn't want to spend the bucks for a large diameter forstner bit.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Ames, IA
    Posts
    471
    Lots of times, like a flooring nail gun and roofing nail gun from HF to name a couple - cheaper than renting, plus more flexibility. Just bought the cheapest large pad sander that I could find to surface a counter top.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by fritz eng View Post
    How many times have you bought tools knowing that they are cheap quality but sufficient to get the job done and of occasional use? I recently bought a half-round rasp and I only wanted it to hog out a hole but didn't want to spend the bucks for a large diameter forstner bit.
    That's what Harbor Freight is for. For anything I might use again, not. For anything that might hurt me if it breaks, not. For big dum lugs, like an engine hoist or an anvil, maybe, but I still don't trust the hydraulics. For anything that requires precision, not.

    By way of example, I was once given a gift of one of those Harbor Freight rotary chain saw attachments for my angle grinder, because the giver had seen someone else use one for cutting brush very effectively. I asked, what did he look like? Well, he only had one arm. I returned it.

    Gimme a sandwich.
    Last edited by Doug Dawson; 01-20-2020 at 12:08 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
    Location
    Tucson, Aridzona
    Posts
    186
    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Dawson View Post
    That's what Harbor Freight is for. For anything I might use again, not. For anything that might hurt me if it breaks, not. For big dum lugs, like an engine hoist or an anvil, maybe, but I still don't trust the hydraulics. For anything that requires precision, not. Gimme a sandwich.
    I've used a lot of HF jacks. Including my current jack. Both in the shop, and in the paddock. Also jack stands, for that matter. They also seem to be the most common ones I've seen in paddocks.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by mike stenson View Post
    I've used a lot of HF jacks. Including my current jack. Both in the shop, and in the paddock. Also jack stands, for that matter. They also seem to be the most common ones I've seen in paddocks.
    I've seen them drop cars. It happens so fast you don't even see it, and God help you if you're under it without auxiliary support. If you see somebody using one for your car, I'd suggest going somewhere else.

  6. #6
    Define cheap. There's affordable, then there's poorly made.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by johnny means View Post
    Define cheap. There's affordable, then there's poorly made.
    The operative phrase was "cheap quality".

  8. #8
    Got my share of HF tools. But I if I needed a Mafell or Snap-on, I would probably buy one instead. Price has to justify the cost.

    Erik
    Felder USA Territory Representative: Central & South Texas

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
    Location
    Tucson, Aridzona
    Posts
    186
    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Dawson View Post
    I've seen them drop cars. It happens so fast you don't even see it, and God help you if you're under it without auxiliary support. If you see somebody using one for your car, I'd suggest going somewhere else.
    Why would anyone work on a car only supported by a jack? That is pretty much the definition of stupidity.

    btw, I've seen more than a couple jacks fail. Some with pretty expensive names on the side.

  10. #10
    i buy plenty of cheap tools but only when I don't need them to perform like expensive tools.

    If you know what to expect, then there's no controversy.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by mike stenson View Post
    Why would anyone work on a car only supported by a jack? That is pretty much the definition of stupidity.
    It's not just the person lowering the car (after reaching in to pull out the stands or whatever.) It's the car itself. Cars have feelings too. They can be hurt. :^)

    And just because somebody is stupid, doesn't mean they deserve to die a slow agonizing death. The world would be a much smaller place.
    Last edited by Doug Dawson; 01-20-2020 at 12:53 PM.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
    Location
    Tucson, Aridzona
    Posts
    186
    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Dawson View Post
    And just because somebody is stupid, doesn't mean they deserve to die a slow agonizing death. The world would be a much smaller place.
    Yea, that is true. Doesn't change what I said. Most of the time I've seen jacks fail, they've been ignored and failed by neglect. That includes the HF ones.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by mike stenson View Post
    Yea, that is true. Doesn't change what I said. Most of the time I've seen jacks fail, they've been ignored and failed by neglect. That includes the HF ones.
    The problem with the HF jacks is poor control of tolerances with the hydraulic seals. The better manufacturers will have QC at the point of production. With HF, what comes off the boat is what you get.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Highland MI
    Posts
    3,791
    Blog Entries
    11
    Lets see, I have a Harbor Freight:
    -chainsaw sharpener
    -carbide blade sharpener
    -1-1/8" SDS impact drill/hammer
    -Flooring nail gun
    -pneumatic stapler
    -T-handle hex wrench set
    -60" F-style aluminum clamps (Four of them)

    Not for frequent use, but all have served me well.
    NOW you tell me...

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    West Lafayette, IN
    Posts
    5,491
    We got it Doug, you donít care for HF hydraulics.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •