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Thread: Honing Oil - applying it to a stone in the correct ammount

  1. #1
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    Honing Oil - applying it to a stone in the correct ammount

    This is just my placeholder initial post and I will provide more data later, but....

    Preyda sells Arkansas stones and "Premium" honing oil. For eample, consider this this bottle:



    When oil comes out of that bottle, it comes out fast and I generally apply too much oil no matter how careful I am. Next, consider this vintage Smith's Honing Oil can.



    This has a very small hole and it is very easy to apply exactly the amount of oil that you desire. I recently refilled an empty can that looks exactly like this one with Norton's honing oil (straight mineral oil).

    I will see if I can add some more containers and indicate how it comes out, but, I prefer less to come out so that I do not need to concentrate carefully on what I am doing.

    Any thoughts?

  2. #2
    I use this. Doesnt come out too fast. Maybe it is not the best for honing, but I have always felt like it works as well as the norton oil.


    Lucas Oil 10875 1 Pack Extreme Duty Gun Oil https://www.amazon.com/dp/B015YL0M3Y..._VPjoEbW1F356Q

  3. #3
    Andrew,

    Almost any light oil will work, everything from kerosene to w10 motor oil. The job of the oil is to carry the metal cuttings off so you need enough to do that job.

    ken

  4. #4
    The old traditional standby is 50% mineral oil from the drug store mixed with 50% kerosene. Been using it for fifty years. Cheap and effective.

  5. #5
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    In a pinch, I used bacon grease once. It worked better than you might think.

  6. #6
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    So, one comment on a product that comes out slowly... Extreme duty gun oil.... I do like the bottle. I bet it is very easy to control.

    oil_01_IMG_20200203_184704.jpgoil_02_IMG_20200203_184715.jpgoil_03_IMG_20200203_184830.jpgoil_04_IMG_20200203_184906.jpg

    oil_05_IMG_20200203_185013.jpg

    The old metal Smith's and the Norton both work the same and are easy to deal with. I know for certain that Norton uses a highly refined mineral oil. The old Smith's also appears to be similar, but that is just a guess. They both have the same delivery method.

    The new Smith's Honing Solution (do they still sell the old??) is very different in nature. I do not find the delivery mechanism to be as easy to control. Bottles of that type seem to leave oil on the lid that then drips down the sides. I am not very happy with it. The honing solution itself is NOT really oil, and it contains things to prevent rust (and similar). They also mention that you can use it on diamond stones. Some people love it because you get a good bite from the stone yet it removes the swarf.

    And Oops, I need to run, so I need to stop being chatty...

    Dan's and Case sure look to be the same to me. I will mention that i used something for delivery that I purchased from a hobby store (see below). It works great. ANd I need to go make some wood for a neighbor (by make I mean cut to size).



    oil_06_IMG_20200203_190243.jpg

  7. #7
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    WD40 from a $20 Gallon container into a cheapo spray bottle for mine.

    Little bottles are wasteful and expensive.

  8. #8
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    Have a plastic bottle of 3in1 that I use....no complaints..

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Matthews View Post
    WD40 from a $20 Gallon container into a cheapo spray bottle for mine.

    Little bottles are wasteful and expensive.
    I think that WD40 is like 15% refined mineral oil and a large percent (50%??) kerosene.

    Smith's, based on the MSDS is likely Alan, here's the MSDS for Smith's solution shows the same evaporation rate and boiling point of water, plus a "Mixture of emollients, lubricants,cleaners and a mild corrosion inhibitor". Much cheaper than a specific product I have seen for diamond plates and this specifically states that it is good for diamond plates.

    I have seen suggestions about mixing 50/50 mineral oil and ODORLESS kerosene. You can get 1 galon of Odorless Kerosene (Klean Heat) from Home Depot for $12 near me. It thins the mineral oil and does not have the terrible smell.

    I asked about Kerosene way back in 2015, had lots of good answers. Someone even suggested odorless mineral spirits.

    I found the SDS for Nathan's Natural Honing Oil, and it claims to be Highly Refined Petroleum Base Oil with nothing added. For exposure, it states "Oil Mist, Mineral" so I assume it is just mineral oil; but why is Dan's, Case, and Nathan's all "colored" as compared to mineral oil?

    https://sawmillcreek.org/showthread....(skin-contact)

    And why when I go to Dan's web site, does the picture of their honing oil look pretty much clear with no color:

    https://www.danswhetstone.com/product/honing-oil/

    The description for that states "light mineral oil", so I wonder if it somehow differs from the colored stuff that I am showing. in my pictures. That said, I found an old reference that claims that Dan's contains kerosene (post from 2014).

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by steven c newman View Post
    Have a plastic bottle of 3in1 that I use....no complaints..
    Yeah, the delivery method is very nice and controlled. Common thing to use with the stones. I had forgotten about that, but now that you mention it.

  11. #11
    The choice of oil depends a bit on how regularly you sharpen. Cheap mineral oil is a mixture of oils of various weights. It works all right if you use it daily. However, if you leave it for a period the lighter components evaporate, leaving a gummy scum. Honing oil is more highly refined, which is why it is more expensive. It has a much tighter range of viscosity so it does not get gummy on the stone if used irregularly.

    I used to use a mixture of motor oil and kerosene, which was cheap at the time. What I liked was the ability to adjust the viscosity simply by adding more of one component or the other. When I became a full time woodworker I found I was coughing in the evenings and I traced it to the kerosene, which is a pretty good irritant.

    WD40 is also an irritant and not something you want to breathe all the time. Might be all right for part time use. It also has a low viscosity so that it does not suspend the steel particles nearly as well as oil. One might as well use water.

  12. #12
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    When oil comes out of that bottle, it comes out fast and I generally apply too much oil no matter how careful I am.
    That looks very similar to my first oilstone set purchased at a Woodcraft store. The oil flow can be controlled by squeezing the bottle lightly after it is opened before tipping it to pour. After tipping release pressure to control the flow.

    My everyday oil is mineral oil and it works fine. My stones do get wiped down regularly.

    There are many different types of oil dispensers available on the market:

    Shop Oilers.jpg

    The three with the plastic bulb base are my favorites for controlling the flow of oil. Those hold my harder to replace oils like silicon oil. My quick search for a source on those was unsuccessful.

    For fast uncontrolled oil flow the Army green can on the left pours it out faster than you can say yikes. It is best for filling the smaller cans. My little oiler isn't in this picture. My recollection it was for use with projectors. It only holds a tablespoon or so of oil. Its cuteness made me bring it home and it didn't cost much.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Warren Mickley View Post
    Might be all right for part time use. It also has a low viscosity so that it does not suspend the steel particles nearly as well as oil. One might as well use water.
    OK, Boomer.

  14. #14
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    I use food grade mineral oil in a spraying bottle. I can pour a small stream or a full spray by controlling the force I apply to the plunger. My oilcan looks like the one in this picture. Made in Hong Kong in the 50s, no. 3, trade mark 555.

    oilcan-555.jpg

  15. #15
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    I use the ironically named Lily White Sewing Machine oil bought a number of years ago. LW oil is refined so it has a non-gummy character to keep sewing machines running freely. I have used it for honing with good results. It is my belief that this is a paraffin base oil. I dispense from a triggered oil can.
    Last edited by Roger Nair; 02-04-2020 at 2:50 PM.

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