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Thread: Old Rusty Tools

  1. #1

    Old Rusty Tools

    These have been in our shop for a loooong time. The planes have Baily on them. The clamps have nothing on them.
    Are the plans worth restoring ? I've seen some Youtube videos that have done a pretty good job of restoring old planes. Guess it would be kind of fun to do if its worth it.
    I did just a little searching on the clamps. Looks like Carpenters Bar clamp ? There are 6 of them. I don't have the lever to turn them but could make one pretty easy I think.
    Any advise on what to do with these ? Thanks
    IMG_0416.jpg
    IMG_0415.jpg

  2. #2
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    If you are going to use them, they are worth getting into working shape.

    Here is the Neanderthal wisdom/FAQs (archive) > https://sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?103805

    There is a lot of restoration posts including this one of mine > https://sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?114373

    That should help you out.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  3. #3
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    Mike,

    +1 on what Jim said. If you could take a few more photos on the planes we could help you more. It would help us identify the planes better, but they appear old enough to be good models of Stanley Bailey planes. Take photos of the toe and front knob area, the area back of the frog in front of the tote which shows the pat. dates and adjustment set ups, the lever cap, take the irons assembly off and take a photo of the top of the frog, and finally take a photo of the area behind the tote which also shows the dates sometimes.

    That said, they all appear to be Stanley Bailey planes from the time frame when Stanley made really good Bailey planes. Like Jim said, these should be great users, and a welcome addition to a Neanders shop once restored.

    With regard to the clamps, you might take a photo of complete clamp. I am not familiar with what I can see of the clamps. In general, however, the old saying is "you can never have too many clamps."

    Regards,

    Stew
    Last edited by Stew Denton; 01-17-2020 at 6:02 PM.

  4. #4
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    If you are near another member, somebody may be able to help you get them into working order.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Burke View Post
    These have been in our shop for a loooong time. The planes have Baily on them. The clamps have nothing on them.
    Are the plans worth restoring ? I've seen some Youtube videos that have done a pretty good job of restoring old planes. Guess it would be kind of fun to do if its worth it.
    I did just a little searching on the clamps. Looks like Carpenters Bar clamp ? There are 6 of them. I don't have the lever to turn them but could make one pretty easy I think.
    Any advise on what to do with these ? Thanks
    There's not much you have to do to an old plane to get it working right, if it worked right before. Bad rust pitting around the front of the mouth could be an issue, but it doesn't look like you have that, from the pictures. A dip in EvapoRust on the wood-contacting extremities could be helpful, better than sanding it off. If the screws work right, that's okay. Even rust on the blade is okay, you can always replace the blade with a new one (or replace it with a recent-production blade from LeeValley or Lie-Nielson or Hock, maybe you might have to file the mouth to fit it, which might take care of minor rust pitting on the original mouth opening.) I'd say, do minimal cleanup and give it a go, after a sharpening. "Restoring" is for people who like shiny (nothing against that personally.)

    No opinion on the clamps. They still make those.
    Last edited by Doug Dawson; 01-17-2020 at 9:26 PM. Reason: clarity

  6. #6
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    Old rusty planes sand paper and coat with Johnson Wax. You can repair Japanning with automotive black paint.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by lowell holmes View Post
    Old rusty planes sand paper and coat with Johnson Wax. You can repair Japanning with automotive black paint.
    I like EvapoRust followed by brake cleaner to wipe off the residue followed by wax, but yeah you can use sandpaper as a first step, if the surface isn't complicated. For somebody working with a lot of rusty stuff, a 5 gallon bucket of EvapoRust is truly a beautiful thing to have around, and goes a looooong ways.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by lowell holmes View Post
    Old rusty planes sand paper and coat with Johnson Wax. You can repair Japanning with automotive black paint.
    I like EvapoRust followed by brake cleaner to wipe off the residue followed by wax, but yeah you can use sandpaper as a first step, if the surface isn't complicated.
    Many years ago a lot of planes passed through my shop. Now not many come through. If someone is doing tool rehab in quantity, their set up is going to be different than one who is only doing a few planes per year.

    Keep it as simple as can be. Use what is at hand.

    Some like strong vinegar or other forms of acetic acid. Are photo supplies still available? Acetic acid is used for a stop solution. Wine makers use it for cleaning glass or some other use. A few ounces of powder to mix up for a de-rusting bath was a few bucks. Search the internet for mixing strength and instructions.

    Someone on SMC uses an inexpensive lemonade powder to mix up an acid bath, read the label.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  9. #9
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    Photo chemicals are still available, but citric acid is cheaper from a brewing supply place than a photo supply place. Works very, very well. Just leaves metal grey.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by mike stenson View Post
    Photo chemicals are still available, but citric acid is cheaper from a brewing supply place than a photo supply place. Works very, very well. Just leaves metal grey.
    Mike, my error, it likely was citric acid for my last de-rusting bath instead of acetic acid.

    My last acetic acid from a photo supplier was about 45 years ago. It would be enough for a whole heck of a lot of de-rusting baths.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    Mike, my error, it likely was citric acid for my last de-rusting bath instead of acetic acid.

    My last acetic acid from a photo supplier was about 45 years ago. It would be enough for a whole heck of a lot of de-rusting baths.

    jtk
    Both will work. Both for rust removal and as a stop bath (citric acid works far better with amidol developer as I recall)

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Koepke View Post
    Mike, my error, it likely was citric acid for my last de-rusting bath instead of acetic acid.

    My last acetic acid from a photo supplier was about 45 years ago. It would be enough for a whole heck of a lot of de-rusting baths.
    The thing I like about EvapoRust, as opposed to sandpaper or even dilute acids, is that it doesn't get rid of the patina, it only gets rid of the rust. You can leave a rusty chisel in a bath of it for a whole week, and it will emerge only with a confused look, otherwise intact (but of course with no rust.)

  13. #13
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    They ONLY time I have ever soaked anything when doing a rehab of a plane....is PBBlaster to loosen stubborn bolts.

    I have a selection of Brass wire wheels, for both the grinder, and the drillpress, including "cup" brushes to get into hard to reach spots.

    If you be afraid of getting your hands dirty, wear gloves....

    At 4 hours per plane..I could have all three up and running in less than a weekend

    Broken handle? Wrap the bolt in tape, add 2-part epoxy to the break, install the handle back on the plane, using that bolt as the clamp.

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by steven c newman View Post
    They ONLY time I have ever soaked anything when doing a rehab of a plane....is PBBlaster to loosen stubborn bolts.

    I have a selection of Brass wire wheels, for both the grinder, and the drillpress, including "cup" brushes to get into hard to reach spots.
    You're not concerned about patina at all? Even brass wire wheels will make shiny. Plus it's more work.

  15. #15
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    Craftsman rehab, right side view.JPG
    And...what are you doing, during all that soak time?
    Drill bit rehab, clean up on aisle 1.JPG
    Hardest "work" I do, is to clean me up, when done..
    Computer Desk Hutch, top shelf jointed.jpg
    This #8 is about as "shiny" as they get...YMMV.....

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