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Thread: How would you install this vanity?

  1. #31
    Just throwing an idea out there - if sagging is a particular concern, a case could be made to build a floating assembly like this in the torsion box style. This would make it light as well as very rigid, resistant to deflection of any sort.

    Also, a torsion box could easily be constructed to accommodate the steel brackets being discussed.
    Last edited by Edwin Santos; 01-23-2020 at 1:03 PM.

  2. #32
    I think what we have settled on it beef L brackets under the top, a french cleat under the bottom and maybe some pocket screts in the right side just for fun. We missed the window to install something pre-drywall, so I suggested we use the L brackets and make a false wall over them.

  3. #33
    I do not think sagging is a concern. I picked up the wood today and it is beautiful 8/4 ash. I think I can get 1 7/8 out of it by the time I plane it down.

    Heavy, though.

    On a side note, is 8/4 ash usually hard to find? Of the three suppliers in town I use two said they do not stock it and no one asks for it. We paid $4.36/BF for it. I thought it seemed a little high.

  4. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Sabo View Post
    except that it's hollow in side to hide the brackets, not a solid 2.5". If supported only at each end it will sag.

    Like I said , this is a lot different than office furniture. Custom residential is a different set problems.

    The first being , no one wants to look at your hardware ! The sooner you acknowledge that, the better off everyone will be.
    Look at what hardware? Any angle iron in my scenario would be completely hidden. Pretty sure I know my way around custom residential, do you?

  5. #35
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    No one seems overly concerned with the weight of this vanity, the sink, the water, the plumbing, and the stuff on top. Someone may lean on this assembly or if they are stupid, try to place body weight on it. I'd be a little concerned about mounting a floating assembly like this.
    Regards,

    Tom

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Sabo View Post
    Ben has it right.

    Bill, rods or fingers will work fine for something that doesn't project from the wall very far. Say 7". But a countertop that's 21"-25" from the wall has lots more forces to engineer for.
    No, but drilled holes, a steel rod, set in epoxy while forcefully pressing the 2 together.
    It sets in no time.

  7. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by johnny means View Post
    Look at what hardware? Any angle iron in my scenario would be completely hidden. Pretty sure I know my way around custom residential, do you?
    Sure do johnny - got the awards, magazine covers, and photos with captains of industry and politicians on the wall documenting the journey. Must admit I'm not as well versed in commercial, which is what you you were on about with your hundreds of installs. I've never seen a commercial shelf or counter as you described where I couldn't look underneath and see the brackets or other supports. Never met a developer that was willing to pay for and allot the time necessary to hollow out those solid tops of which you speak to conceal said brackets. I'm sure they are out there though, cause you've seemed to have found them. All of what I've run across is mdf/particle board covered in laminate.

    BTW , what kind of tooling are you using to bore the pockets 15-20" deep into these solid tops to conceal your hardware ?

    What I am well versed in is the Euro type design and construction that Gunter's pic shows. They will never (well almost) use solid timber for a top like that and there is a cottage industry for manuf. the fittings used to hang them. They'll be veneered onto a ladder box type frame of mdf or particle board. Some even do honeycomb cardboard substrates to save weight. One of our suppliers uses honeycomb aluminum like you'd find in aviation interior panels. If one doesn't mind looking at the hardware when peering underneath the top, these are easy. But inconspicuous and totally hidden are two different things in my circles. I'm glad your system works for you, just keep in mind that "overkill" in your realm may just be the standard in someone else's. Not everyone wants , needs, or can afford obsessive detail like the picture - but those that do don't want good enough.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Günter VögelBerg View Post
    I do not think sagging is a concern. I picked up the wood today and it is beautiful 8/4 ash. I think I can get 1 7/8 out of it by the time I plane it down.

    Heavy, though.

    On a side note, is 8/4 ash usually hard to find? Of the three suppliers in town I use two said they do not stock it and no one asks for it. We paid $4.36/BF for it. I thought it seemed a little high.
    Not hard to find but more expensive:

    https://www.woodworkerssource.com/as...84-lumber.html
    “Pay no attention to what you cannot control..” Epictetus, 100 A.D.
    It costs nothing to be kind to others

  9. #39
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    A bit off topic on this thread, but Ash trees are disappearing at an alarming rate. 4 or 5 large ash trees along about a block and a half of the street I live on have died in just the past 3 or 4 years.
    Just wondering if they are dying off nation wide.
    In a few short years we may see the extinction of ash, similar to how Chestnut disappeared in the early 20th century.
    All the more reason to get this right.
    I hope you find an exceptionally good way to solve this issue.

    This slab, about 2.5 years old is 30"x 21" and could be milled or sawn to 10".

    My apologies to OP. Just wanted to spread the word about a serious topic in case those unfamiliar with the Ash blight read this.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Bill Jobe; 01-25-2020 at 5:21 PM.

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Jobe View Post
    similar to how Chestnut disappeared in the early 20th century.
    That point is already here. In most all but a few areas Ash are pretty much gone. Its gone to the point where transport bans are no longer strictly enforced. Most around here done even bother cutting them anymore because they are standing dead/dry and you can get them on the ground without blowing them to pieces.

    The prices here for KD Ash dwarfed Cherry a year or so ago. Its gone through the roof.
    Sometimes I just want to look at pretty pictures,... Thats when I go to the Turners Forum

  11. #41
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    ThAnk god I got this then.

    195B8881-EEDF-4763-B1A6-D423506A0F7D.jpg

    Was very easy to find 12/4 stick five years ago when I built it.

    Try Horizone Hardwood in PA..

  12. #42
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    A lot that you find now is from small sawing operations who are still cutting the dead stuff. A lot of it heavily spalted, at least what Ive seen not a lot of thick/clear/stable unless its the live edge dog doo from the other thread.

    I had been sawing all I could off my property but there was no way I could cut it all. Several years ago it was all dead standing and you would have to saw around what you got when the tree hit the ground.
    Sometimes I just want to look at pretty pictures,... Thats when I go to the Turners Forum

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