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Thread: How would you install this vanity?

  1. #1

    How would you install this vanity?

    i have been asked to build a vanity similar to the one pictured here, but the bottom shelf will extend all the way to the right wall. I have studs 16 inches OC on the back wall. How would you recommend mounting this? Is there commercial hardware I can use?
    received_925103571239451.jpeg

  2. #2
    Günter, there are quite a variety of commercial brackets you could use. A search for floating shelf brackets will find you a few styles. You could also use the hidden brackets used for floating countertops (search for floating countertop brackets). The latter tend to be beefier since they are made to support granite countertops, but usually require some access to the framing in the wall.

    I have used the floating shelf brackets that consist of a long metal bar that gets fastened to every stud in the wall and then has tubes extending outward that get embedded in the shelving.

    Some folks just bore 1/2 holes into the studs and insert steel rods that get embedded in the shelf. I don't like to do that in a bathroom because if you miss hitting the stud right on center you risk hitting plumbing. Plus the framing in bathroom wet walls has often been compromised already by the plumber drilling holes and cutting notches for the plumbing, and I don't like to risk weakening it further.
    --Certainty is the refuge of a small mind--

  3. #3
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    How big will this be? Any idea what it will weigh? How many studs will you have behind it? Do you have access to the framing?

    Like Paul said there are many floating shelf brackets available but most are made for lightweight shelf’s, not a heavy vanity. The countertop version he mentions sounds to me like the best option.
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  4. #4
    about 6 feet long. This is new construction so I may have access to the wall. On the far right I can mount both the top and bottom to the right wall. The far left will be floating. The end will be dovetailed to the top and bottom. It will be made of 8/4 ash, so it will be heavy.

  5. #5
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    It would be slightly visible, but I can picture a cleat made of the same ash. Run it the entire length from the left end to the wall and along the right end, front to back. Bolt it to the wall with lags and plug the holes. Then set the vanity on it and run screws from the bottom up - angle these to draw the vanity tight to the wall.

  6. #6
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    If you have the wall open consider adding a stud or fireblocks where needed. The fire blocks can be turned on the side for bigger targets. I used 2x6 around the bathtub.
    Bill D

  7. #7
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    There’s no need for special hardware. A few wood screws will hold it. Under each horizontal part, I’d glue a piece of wood at the rear which is 3/4” square or so, and the length of the part. At install, I’d locate each stud, and run a screw through the flange into each one. To see those screw heads, somebody will have to be sitting on the floor peering inside. They’ll also be looking at plumbing entrails, so a screw head or two won’t matter. If you’re really concerned about it, use pocket screws.

    Be sure to tell the rough plumber where you need the plumbing to come out of the wall.

  8. #8
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    To be clear, floating shelf brackets are needed when you’re trying to hang a shelf that might be only 2” tall by 12” or more front-to-back. In that 2” there’s not much leverage to prevent the front edge of the shelf from drooping if you load it. The pictured shelf has plenty of height , so it has plenty of leverage to hold up the front edge under load.

    The pictured shelf is more related to the upper cabinets in a kitchen. Those are routinely fastened with just a few screws along the top edge.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jamie Buxton View Post
    There’s no need for special hardware. A few wood screws will hold it. Under each horizontal part, I’d glue a piece of wood at the rear which is 3/4” square or so, and the length of the part. At install, I’d locate each stud, and run a screw through the flange into each one. To see those screw heads, somebody will have to be sitting on the floor peering inside. They’ll also be looking at plumbing entrails, so a screw head or two won’t matter. If you’re really concerned about it, use pocket screws.

    Be sure to tell the rough plumber where you need the plumbing to come out of the wall.

    2nd this. And if you won't ever be the one to remove it, you could plug the holes, then sand and finish them.
    If you don't stand for something, you'll fall for anything.

  10. #10
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    I'd probably consider using "hidden" shelf/mantle brackets for something like that.
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  11. #11
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    Pocket screws from the bottom at each stud on both shelves.

    2x blocking on edge if you still have access to framing then 12” oc , if not no big deal, 16” centers should be adequate.
    Last edited by Charlie Velasquez; 01-17-2020 at 6:36 PM.
    Comments made here are my own and, according to my children, do not reflect the opinions of any other person... anywhere, anytime.

  12. #12
    I would locate the studs in the wall behind and on the right side. I would make pocket hole type hole so they come out of the back edge about 1/2" from the top surface, leaving plenty of wood between the point where the screw head will be flush with the bottom surface. Then anchor the vanity to the wall with 6" or 8" Timberloc screws (depending upon the angle of the screws and the total thickness of the wall,) one into each stud. Do the same with the lower shelf. These screws have a tensile strength of 1950 pounds, so the wood will fail before the screws will.
    timber loc.jpg
    Lee Schierer
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    Captain USN(Ret)

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  13. #13
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    Second Lee method, but with 2 x 6 as blocking between studs.
    Bob

  14. #14
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    French cleat.
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  15. #15
    I would anchor angle iron to the wall and hide it within the shelf and countertop.
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