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Thread: Getting into Sketchup

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    Phoenix AZ
    Posts
    394
    Has anybody used Tinkercad? It’s free and pretty simple to use. I used to use it to design parts for drones to be 3D printed.

    You don’t need to download anything, just log in to the website.
    “Pay no attention to what you cannot control..” Epictetus, 100 A.D.
    It costs nothing to be kind to others

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Lebanon, TN
    Posts
    566
    This thread made me have a go at getting back into SketchUp and taking a look at SketchList 3D.

    I'm using a MacBook Pro with latest 64bit operating system.

    First SketchList 3D would not run on this, but Dave told me they are very close to releasing a 64 bit version.

    So I fired up SketchUp 2017 Make, the free version. This crapped out on me 3 times in a row after doing a couple of simple operations.


    Bummed...any other recommendations? I'm a hobbyist, retired and don't mind spending up to $200 one time) for a solution.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    171
    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisA Edwards View Post
    This thread made me have a go at getting back into SketchUp and taking a look at SketchList 3D.

    So I fired up SketchUp 2017 Make, the free version. This crapped out on me 3 times in a row after doing a couple of simple operations.
    The latest version of Sketchup still has a free option. https://www.sketchup.com/plans-and-p.../sketchup-free.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Lebanon, TN
    Posts
    566
    Quote Originally Posted by Bryan Hunt View Post
    The latest version of Sketchup still has a free option. https://www.sketchup.com/plans-and-p.../sketchup-free.
    Thanks, I'm struggling through Fusion 360. Looks like a fabulous program, but it's going to take some seat time to get mildly proficient in using it. I'm going to stick with it as I have a few projects where I'd really like to get Computer Aided Drawings, rather than me going to my old drawing board and pencil.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    10
    Much like the OP I am moving from pen and paper to digital design and layout. There are variety of reasons that are driving me in that direction and I won't go into them all, but much it is convenience and customer response. Being able to fix drawings, lines, sizes, and shapes with a few strokes and keys rather an eraser, protractor, and ruler is highly desirable. I was never a great draftsman, and trying to draw things to scale with an architects ruler was a lot of work. Moreover I can show 2d drawings where all the different parts are different colors and then 3d images that can be turned in ever direction and taken apart to reveal construction, which to say is a hit with clients would be a gross understatement.

    My process generally follows from lots of doodling in drawing program, ProCreate. Then a more formalized layout and design in the same drawing program, upon which I draw upon to make a 3d CAD. To further make the utility of this process more accessible in my shop and with clients, I bought an iPad pro. After very little use, the Apple pencil makes drawing effortless and quite similar in feel and feedback to a real pencil, but with all of the colors, pencils, markers, and pens in the world at my disposal.

    Unfortunately though, SketchUp doesn't make an iPad app. However, after a little research I came across an amazing app made specifically for the iPad called Shapr3D. A fantastic CAD app with loads of tutorials, webinars, and support. And the reviews were strong so I pulled the trigger and signed on for the annual subscription after messing around with the academic trial version for a week. (Note -- they quickly offer a discount rate if you stall a bit on signing up for it after downloading the trial version.) Frankly, I'm loathe to buy subscriptions, I'm old enough to remember and prefer buying something once and having it forever. But the support and constant stream of webinars and new tutorials, in other words, new content, is what actually makes me not regret the purchase.

    Now for the bad -- the learning curve is indeed something to consider. I had never used any sort of CAD program, so I was starting from nothing. And learning the terminology and concepts of how to make these objects was a huge challenge. And still I struggle after about 6 months of use -- entirely my own fault, because, like any technical craft, constant practice determines facility and I take weeks long breaks after designing for the builds. However, when I get back on it, I am excited by how quickly things come together and can happily attest that I would eagerly endure the entire learning process again for the benefits I have reaped from its use.

    Admittedly, dropping a grand on an iPad to be able to use this app is steep, but I wanted to replace my MacBook Pro for when I travel, and the new iPads are just incredible. I'm still learning to use all of the tools, ProCreate (which is also just an incredible bit of software with an incredible history of support, tutorials, and community), shapr3d, and the iPad -- but given all the cash I've dropped for single purpose tools in my shop, this set up is definitely a valuable and extremely useful investment.

  6. #21
    I've been using Sketchup since 2007 for designing projects. I rarely build anything these days that that I don't first build in Sketchup. I can visualize something in my head and just pull out some wood and build it but if I build it first in Sketchup I catch the mistakes I would make in real life in the 3D space without wasting material and can work out complex joinery before ever attempting it. The amount of plugins and tools that are available for Sketchup is also amazing and drawing it it just feels natural now after years of using it. Anything that I draw in Sketchup that might be helpful to someone else I share in the Sketchup 3D warehouse. That is one of the cool things about the Sketchup community is the number of other peoples drawings and components that are available to you to borrow and modify. My page is here: teetomterrific

    However, I have on my to do list to also learn Fusion 360 because I want to start doing some CNC and 3D printing. It's never too late to learn something new.

  7. #22
    I’ve been using the free version of Sketchup for years. I found it had a bit of a learning curve eased by the wealth of online tutorials. I would not spend the money to buy the pro version until I had exhausted the features of Sketchup Make (the free one). And for me the difference in moving to 3D modelling was very powerful: I even do trivial designs on Sketchup rather than drag out a ruler and eraser.

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