Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: Sawhorse and Cutting Grid Cart

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Boston MA
    Posts
    61

    Sawhorse and Cutting Grid Cart

    When I need to break down sheet goods with my Festool track saw, I need to set up a cutting grid on sawhorses in the driveway as there is no space within the workshop to handle a full sheet. Until now, that meant dragging out the folding sawhorses (they're heavy) and as many of the cutting grid pieces as I needed from the rear of the workshop - several trips back and forth. And, of course, the same thing in reverse when I was done.

    No more! I built this little cart to hold the sawhorses, cutting grid pieces and Festool parallel guides. Now I can wheel the whole setup out to the driveway as a unit.

    I will probably add a few hooks on the outside for additional accessories.

    IMG_0788.jpg

    IMG_0791.jpg

    IMG_0793.jpg

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    19,958
    That is pretty trick. I have the same sawhorses and problem. I may have to borrow that idea.
    Who knows what stands in front of,
    our lives; I fashion my future on films in space.

  3. #3
    Looks like a good solution. Thanks for posting it Mark!
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing."
    - Sir Edmund Burke

  4. #4
    That is pretty slick, Mark. Any pictures of it set up?

  5. #5
    Too much work for me. Years ago (2000 to be exact) there was an article in the August issue of FWW on using circular saw in furniture making shop. Article featured a table, with folding legs, that had side rails from plywood, and 2 X 4's flat wise to form a grid. I built one, and when 2 X 4's get worn replace them with new. About every third rebuild, completely rebuild table, except for legs. Mine is just under seven feet long, and 32" wide. The reason for the length is I have a trailer that is exactly seven feet long in the bed.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Boston MA
    Posts
    61
    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Frederick View Post
    That is pretty slick, Mark. Any pictures of it set up?
    The only picture I found of it setup was this one which used only a portion of the grid. Using the sawhorses, only two of the long grid elements can be used but all of the cross pieces can be. I cut the slots in the pieces on 12" centers which just happened to work with the width of the sawhorses (I built the grid before acquiring the sawhorses so that was a lucky break).

    IMG_0560.jpg

    This next picture is of the full grid setup on my workbench just after building it. It's a bit awkward using it there, which is why I usually set it up outside on the sawhorses. Note that one crosspiece is just 3' long while the others are 4'. Ran out of decent stock to make an eight 4' piece. I did make up a few more 3' pieces so I can make up a 3' x 3', 3' x 4' or 3' x 8' grid if I don't need full sheet capacity.

    IMG_0399.jpg

    Here's the basic grid, if you'd like to build one yourself. I can't take credit for the concept as I saw it here on the Creek or another forum and adapted it.

    Screen Shot 2020-01-17 at 9.59.15 AM.jpg

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    Phoenix AZ
    Posts
    511
    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Wrenn View Post
    Too much work for me. Years ago (2000 to be exact) there was an article in the August issue of FWW on using circular saw in furniture making shop. Article featured a table, with folding legs, that had side rails from plywood, and 2 X 4's flat wise to form a grid. I built one, and when 2 X 4's get worn replace them with new. About every third rebuild, completely rebuild table, except for legs. Mine is just under seven feet long, and 32" wide. The reason for the length is I have a trailer that is exactly seven feet long in the bed.
    I’m aware that some people lay sheet goods on top of a thick sheet of rigid foam insulation to cut to size. Set the saw to cut just below the sheet so it doesn’t get to messy with foam cuttings. Have you considered or tried that?
    “Pay no attention to what you cannot control..” Epictetus, 100 A.D.
    It costs nothing to be kind to others

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Daily View Post
    I’m aware that some people lay sheet goods on top of a thick sheet of rigid foam insulation to cut to size. Set the saw to cut just below the sheet so it doesn’t get to messy with foam cuttings. Have you considered or tried that?
    I do this, on a cheap blow-molded folding table. It's light, and works well. The sheets I use are about 12 years old.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    River Falls WI
    Posts
    412

    Building a new cutting grid/table

    I like your idea of the cart, but I move mine between my basement and garage. Mine does not dissemble and has banquet table legs. The issue I have had is the legs do not take a lot of abuse, and I keep buying them. So for my new table I bought the Kreg project table legs to try. They also have wheels. I also bought the TrueTrac Expandable Track Table Kit years ago. I have started using this in my basement shop on saw horses or on my Centipede (now Bora) I found my Bench Cookies with the double risers stop my plywood from sliding around and I can adjust the height. Thanks for some additional ideas. Dan

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Central North Carolina
    Posts
    1,580
    Mark,

    That's a pretty slick way of keeping and moving your cutting frame. I also need to break up my sheet stock outside my shop, but I went a different way over 20 years ago. I made a roughly 30 X 70 cutting table frame of 1 X 4 pine with 2 X 4 cross pieces laid flat and flush with the top edge of the 1 X 4 frame, one across the center and two more at each end, spaced and positioned where needed to allow attaching a set of banquet table legs that I bought from Northern Tool. The table frame was assembled using biscuits and Titebond II so there is no metal in it, except for the short screws that attach the table legs to the under side of the 2 X 4s. When the legs are folded, they are up inside the frame, so the table is only 3 1/2" thick (the width of the 1 X 4 frame. I store it leaning against my sheet stock. In use, it sets up easily outside my shop and is a good working height (metal knees keep me from working at ground level).

    In use, I set my circular saw to cut about 1/4" deeper than the sheet stock that I will be breaking up. I have a 52 and 104" wide aluminum clamp guides that I bought from Peachtree Woodworking www.ptreeusa.com to guide my saw, but if you have a track saw, that would be a better choice. I make most of the cuts down, or across roughly the middle of the table. This way, neither piece falls as the cut is being completed. I don't worry about the kerf marks in the table surface. If I ever get so many that they cause problems, I'll just make a new top and move the legs to it.

    This cutting table has also been used as a quick expansion picnic table when unexpected guests showed up. Adding a sheet of plywood and a table cloth is all that was needed.

    I've attached a few photos of my cutting table and straight edge clamps. On one long side of the table you can see two small pieces of plywood attached. These are held on with one screw each, off center in each piece, so I can turn these to be below the top of the table or above. When above, they extend about 1" above the table surface. For loading sheet stock I turn these pieces so they extend above the table, then lay the table on it's side with these pieces down against my driveway. Then I place the sheet against the table with the bottom edge sitting on these small plywood pieces. I can then bend down and lift both the sheet and the table until it is standing with the sheet laying flat on the table top. I then turn the plywood pieces so they are again below the table surface and position the sheet for the first cut.

    I made a sheet stock mover using two re-purposed wheels and axle stubs from an old lawn mower and some scrap birch plywood. The two side pieces are spaced about 1" apart, so I can use this mover with just about any sheet material that I might use. Just drop the edge of the sheet into it and wheel it to where needed. It will even hold the sheet standing on edge as pictured, if the wind isn't blowing or the ground not level. I made the sides of this mover longer than the first one that I made, so it has handle holes at the top. This makes it easy to pick it up and carry it, or place it in position. Other than the suggested 1" space between the sides, the dimensions are not critical (That's a full sheet of 1" cabinet Birch on it in the photo). I'm an old man with metal knees and heart problems, so these are necessary now for me to manage moving and cutting of my sheet stock.

    Charley
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Charles Lent; 01-18-2020 at 9:34 AM.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Boston MA
    Posts
    61
    Charley,

    I like your cutting table arrangement and considered something like it before I made mine. I decided against it because I felt I couldn't spare the space for something that was fully assembled.

    I like your homemade plywood dolly and will probably throw one of those together (though I've seen ones you could buy pretty cheaply and I don't have any spare wheels laying around). I do have one of those Gorilla Grippers for lifting sheets but my 71-year old arms aren't as strong as they used to be.

    Thank you (and also the others above) for your comments.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    1,911
    You guys with your fancy sacrificial grids! I just use three of the $29 ToughBuilt sawhorses (LINK), two 2x4s and slap a 4x8 sheet of 2" rigid foam on top. Sawhorses get hung on the wall on some shelving brackets I hung, 2x4s get stored with the rest of the wood as does the rigid foam. No need to make grid and I've yet to need to replace the rigid foam but thats easy and cheap enough to do when it comes time.
    If at first you don't succeed, redefine success!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •