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Thread: Drill Press

  1. #1

    Drill Press

    I wonder why no one has manufactured a drill press for wood working. We use a drill press made for metal working and modify it with a different table. You'd think there'd be a market for it. Any other tool we use in a wood shop that was made for metal work and we modify it? Lathes certainly have been modified into a wood working lathe. Just curious?

  2. #2
    Not much to modify is there? I am sure somebody sells a pre-made table for them if you don't want to make one yourself

  3. #3
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    It's a good question. I suspect that the tool manufacturers have little incentive to sell the same tool with just a different table for this particular thing. Many woodworkers, including myself, also use their DPs for both wood and metal because of the nature of the tool. The standard table does work fine for both uses when you get down to it, even if it's not the best for woodworking. Ideally, we'd use different table setups for each, but most of us likely stick with whatever woodworking accommodations we've made on the tool even when drilling metal. LOL
    --

    The most expensive tool is the one you buy "cheaply" and often...

  4. #4
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    https://www.bosch-do-it.com/gb/en/di...163-199903.jsp

    Seems more or less intended for woodworking. Did sound as though it has a power tool motor so sorta noisy. Cool electronic speed control.

    Retails for around
    260.- in Germany.



  5. #5
    Never felt the need to modify my drill presses.
    "Anything seems possible when you don't know what you're doing."

  6. #6
    The Nova Voyager DVR was pretty much built for woodworking but I think they missed the mark on everything below the DVR head to build a true 21st century WW drill press. The table is too small and too much like a traditional metal working table and the column/table movement is sloppy. It should have been a two column support with a modern precision motorized ball screw movement that complements the depth control of the DVR head. </rant>

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Dixon View Post
    The Nova Voyager DVR was pretty much built for woodworking but I think they missed the mark on everything below the DVR head to build a true 21st century WW drill press. The table is too small and too much like a traditional metal working table and the column/table movement is sloppy. It should have been a two column support with a modern precision motorized ball screw movement that complements the depth control of the DVR head. </rant>

    I agree. It looks like a cheap Taiwan base/post/table with a better head. Was underwhelmed.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Larry Edgerton View Post
    I agree. It looks like a cheap Taiwan base/post/table with a better head. Was underwhelmed.
    $1,500+ for a Chinese drill press with some pretty rough looking castings and machining not exactly cheap either.

  9. #9
    I have a Voyager, and am definitely not underwhelmed! Sure, there are features that would make it nicer, but at a price, and doubtful they would be commensurately appreciated.

    Andy

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    The least impressive feature of the Voyager is the sloppy raise/lower mechanism. While it works efficiently, it loses position after any movement. I have an idea on how to modify mine in this regard, but will not be able to test this out for a while. Any others have thoughts on this?

    With regard the table, I agree that the cast iron tables supplied are better suited for metal work. The Voyager benefits from a purpose-made sub-table. There are custom tables sold by a number of vendors, and many of us go through this process fairly routinely. However this should not be necessary if the drill press was designed specifically with woodworking in mind. The work holding needs are pretty universal.

    My efforts for a table are here: https://sawmillcreek.org/showthread....ll-Press-Table

    Regards from Singapore

    Derek

  11. #11
    After reading these posts and knowing lots of woodworkers I guess the truth is even if one was manufactured for wood working folks would modify it anyway. Sort of the nature of the beast. Sometimes that's fun too.

  12. #12
    What would be different?

    After using a floor model for many years, truthfully I rarely need the power for what I do. I've never changed the speed on it from day 1.

    I think a bench top model might be the best "woodworking" drill press. I can envision it built into a bench top similar to a miter saw.

  13. #13
    Likely, manufacturers don't make a WW specific DP because the vast majority of folks would opt for a machine capable of both metal and wood drilling. That said, I have a variable speed DP/Mill that I use for WW, with no mods needed. The only thing I do is place a wood table over the metal table.

  14. #14
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    The Delta 18-900L drill press is designed for woodworking. It even has a long stroke which works well when drilling 16/4 + material.

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