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Thread: Lead cinch or what’s your pencil

  1. #1
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    Lead cinch or what’s your pencil

    After reading Kirby’s dovetail book, I began to wonder about the pencil as a vital tool. So what pencil do you use and why?

  2. #2
    Yellow no. 2 school pencil like the kids use. Because it fits in my little pencil sharpener, it's comfortable to hold, it has an eraser, and super cheap. If it ain't wrong don't fix it!

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Wilkins View Post
    After reading Kirby’s dovetail book, I began to wonder about the pencil as a vital tool. So what pencil do you use and why?
    Kirby's dovetail book is an excellent resource! Staedtler Mars mechanical pencil at Staples. Can sharpen leads to needle point. Cannot draw a finer line.

  4. #4
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    Lead clinch aka lead holder aka chuck pencil. Used them as a lad when I was a draftsman. I have a couple lead pointers (sharpeners) courtesy of antique dealers that had no clue what they had. Nothing better.

    F992A1C0-4688-404F-A1D8-10660DA99EFA.jpg
    Last edited by Rob Luter; 01-13-2020 at 11:07 PM.
    Sharp solves all manner of problems.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Luter View Post
    Lead clinch aka lead holder aka chuck pencil. Used them as a lad when I was a draftsman. I have a couple lead pointers (sharpeners) courtesy of antique dealers that had no clue what they had. Nothing better.

    F992A1C0-4688-404F-A1D8-10660DA99EFA.jpg
    I like my lead holder. I'm jealous of your pointers, very nice!

    Otherwise, I will use a .7mm drawing pencil. It seems to fit nicely in knife lines.

  6. #6
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    My main pencil is a #1 with a cloths pin type clip for in my pocket at times. Next is a carpenter style pencil. These can be sharpened to a very fine edge for following knife lines or they can be allowed to go dull for a fatter line. There are a few of these of various degrees of sharpness in the pencil cup.

    My Staedtler Mars drafting lead holders also get used at times when a different hardness of lead is desired. There are about a half dozen of these around. My most used lead pointer fits in the end of my electric eraser and points up a lead quickly.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Luter View Post
    Lead clinch aka lead holder aka chuck pencil. Used them as a lad when I was a draftsman. I have a couple lead pointers (sharpeners) courtesy of antique dealers that had no clue what they had. Nothing better.

    F992A1C0-4688-404F-A1D8-10660DA99EFA.jpg
    Ah, that brings me back. Drafting supplies in engineering school, mid-seventies. I used these lovingly. Now I use the Dixon Ticonderoga with a sharp metal sharpener for gross layout, but all the while I wish I had one of these, especially when I'm designing on paper now. On finish parts I use a marking knife or cutting gauge for the cut line as a reference for the chisel.

  8. #8
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    I WILL need to stop stopping in here. I've just found a nice red-bottomed Tru Point lead pointer and settled for a new Staedtler Mars Technico 2 mm lead holder. Out came the credit card.

  9. #9
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    No. 3 or 4 Berol Mirado, or earlier version of the same pencil. Started life as the Eagle Pencil company, and first name was Mikado, but that name was changed after the attack on Pearl Harbor, when all things Japanese were frowned on. They stopped making them the same way in the 1980's.

    I used to be able to buy them in office supply stores, until they were bought out, and cheapened. They still can be found on ebay, by people like me, and sometimes go for real money. I have hoarded more than I will ever need. Leads for mechanical pencils can also still be found, but a point on a regular pencil will mark as fine a line as a marking knife.

    People that grew up with nothing better than a Ticonderoga may not be able to tell the difference. If you press down as hard as you do with a Ticonderoga, the lead may not last much longer. Once you learn how light of a touch is all that's needed, they will mark as fine a line as you want for a very long time.

    They can be sharpened to as sharp a point as anyone needs with a good quality crank pencil sharpener, or even a sharp little pencil sharpener kept in a pocket. I like the old Berol crank sharpeners for this too-new cutters can be found once in a while on ebay.

    edited to add old story: Sometime in the late 1970's, a Pella window salesman handed me a handful of carpenters pencils, at a jobsite of one of my houses. I handed them back, and told him I appreciated the gift, but that I couldn't do anything with them. He looked surprised, and asked me what I used. I took a pencil out of my toolbelt, and marked a line by a combination square. His eyes widened as he said, "No wonder you do such good work!".

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    Last edited by Tom M King; 01-14-2020 at 9:30 AM.

  10. #10
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    Staedtler Mars mechanical pencil and a Mobius + Ruppert Brass Lead Pointer for 2 mm and 3.2 mm Leads. Works great.
    Michael Dilday
    Suffolk, Va.

  11. #11
    I have pentel graphgear 1000 pencils and Nano Dia leads all over the shop and my office. Mostly .5mm, but have a .3 and a .7 around somewhere. The pencils feel great in my hand and the leads just don't break.

    I do keep a few carpenters pencils for framing and other carpentry type work.
    --Certainty is the refuge of a small mind--

  12. #12
    Staetler wood pencil 4H (hard) - sharpens to fine point, marks a fine line, stays sharp for a long time.

  13. #13
    I use pentel .5 mm mechanical pencils with HB polymer lead, the lead never needs sharpening.
    Lee Schierer
    USNA- '71
    Captain USN(Ret)

    My advice, comments and suggestions are free, but it costs money to run the site. If you found something of value here please give a little something back by becoming a contributor! Please Contribute

  14. #14
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    I agree with chris.

  15. #15
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    Today to darken some shallow knife lines an old 3B drafting pencil was used.

    A light touch still produces a dark line.

    It is easier to erase a light line made by a soft pencil than a similar darkness line made by a harder pencil.

    jtk
    "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
    - Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

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